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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. How Modeling Can Inform Strategies to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21807.
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B

Workshop Agenda

Roundtable on Population Health Improvement
Workshop: How Modeling Can Inform Strategies to Improve
Population Health
April 9, 2015

National Academy of Sciences, Lecture Room
2101 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC

8:15 a.m. Welcome and overview of the day
David Kindig, professor emeritus of population health sciences, emeritus vice chancellor for health sciences, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health; co-chair, Roundtable on Population Health Improvement
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. How Modeling Can Inform Strategies to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21807.
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8:25 a.m. Context-setting presentations
Moderator: Louise Russell, distinguished professor, Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research and Department of Economics, Rutgers University
Why modeling matters in improving population health
Steven Teutsch, planning committee chair, former chief science officer, Los Angeles County Public Health
Why do we need models, and how have they been used?
Ross Hammond, senior fellow, economic studies, and director, Center on Social Dynamics and Policy, Brookings Institution
9:05 a.m. Q&A/Discussion
9:20 a.m. Case studies of models used to inform health policy
Case studies will illustrate (a) different kinds of models, (b) how they have been used, (c) effectiveness (or lack thereof) in informing decisions.
Moderator: Marthe Gold, professor emerita of community health and social medicine, Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Sciences, City College of New York; visiting scholar, New York Academy of Medicine
Case study 1: Tobacco models
David Mendez, associate professor of health management and policy, University of Michigan
Case study 2: EPA air standards
Pasky Pascual, former director, Council for Regulatory Environmental Modeling, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
Case study 3: Regional health reform
Bobby Milstein, director, ReThink Health
10:20 a.m. Break
10:35 a.m. Discussion of case studies
11:05 a.m. Remarks from the IOM president
Victor Dzau, president, Institute of Medicine
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. How Modeling Can Inform Strategies to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21807.
×
11:20 a.m. What would population health decision makers like from models?
Gary VanLandingham, director, Pew–MacArthur Results First Initiative
Instructions for discussion groups
Steven Woolf, professor of family medicine and population health, and director, Center on Society and Health, Virginia Commonwealth University
11:45 a.m. What would population health decision makers like from models?
Group 1: Health risk factors (e.g., obesity, substance abuse)Facilitator: Karen Minyard, Georgia Health Policy Center
Group 2: Natural and built environments (e.g., air, water, transit, housing)
Facilitator: Pasky Pascual, EPA
Group 3: Social and economic conditions (e.g., education, income, discrimination)
Facilitator: Gary VanLandingham, Results First
Group 4: Integrated health systems (e.g., community conditions and clinical services)
Facilitator: Bobby Milstein, ReThink Health
12:45 p.m. Lunch
1:15 p.m. Discussion groups report back (followed by discussion to explore action items for future model development) Rapporteurs:
Group 1: George Miller, fellow, Altarum Institute
Group 2: J. T. Lane, assistant secretary, Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals
Group 3: Nick Macchione, director, San Diego Health and Human Services Agency
Group 4: Louise Russell, Rutgers University
2:15 p.m. Barriers and opportunities for using models to inform population health interventions and policiesModerator: Bobby Milstein, director, ReThink Health
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. How Modeling Can Inform Strategies to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21807.
×
Model validation and decision making
Michael Weisberg, associate professor, Department of Philosophy, University of Pennsylvania
Improving communication with policy makers on the use and usefulness of models
Karen Minyard, director and associate research professor, Department of Public Management and Policy, Georgia Health Policy Center
Representative Sharon Cooper, chair, health and human services committee, Georgia State House of Representatives
3:00 p.m. Discussion of barriers and opportunities
3:30 p.m. Break
3:45 p.m. Future Directions
Moderator: Steven Teutsch, former chief science officer, Los Angeles County Public Health
Preventive and Population Health Models Group at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation
Darshak Sanghavi, director, Preventive and Population Health Models Group, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation/Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services
Lessons for using modeling in assessing health impact
Rajiv Bhatia, director, The Civic Engine
4:30 p.m. Discussion with all workshop attendees on future directions and capacity building
Facilitator: Steven Teutsch
5:00 p.m. Reflections on and reactions to the day
George Isham, senior advisor, HealthPartners, senior fellow, HealthPartners Institute for Education and Research; co-chair, Roundtable on Population Health Improvement
5:30 p.m. Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. How Modeling Can Inform Strategies to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21807.
×
Page 87
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. How Modeling Can Inform Strategies to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21807.
×
Page 88
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. How Modeling Can Inform Strategies to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21807.
×
Page 89
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. How Modeling Can Inform Strategies to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21807.
×
Page 90
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In April 2015, the Institute of Medicine convened a workshop to explore the potential uses of simulation and other types of modeling for the purpose of selecting and refining potential strategies, ranging from interventions to investments, to improve the health of communities and the nation's health. Participants worked to identify how modeling could inform population health decision making based on lessons learned from models that have been, or have not been, used successfully, opportunities and barriers to incorporating models into decision making, and data needs and opportunities to leverage existing data and to collect new data for modeling. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions from this workshop.

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