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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. How Modeling Can Inform Strategies to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21807.
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A

References

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Mendez, D., and K. E. Warner. 2004. Adult cigarette smoking prevalence: Declining as expected (not as desired). American Journal of Public Health 94(2):251–252.

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. How Modeling Can Inform Strategies to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21807.
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Milstein, B., J. Homer, P. Briss, D. Burton, and T. Pechacek. 2011. Why behavioral and environmental interventions are needed to improve health at lower cost. Health Affairs (Millwood) 30(5):823–832.

Pascual, P., W. E. Wagner, and E. C. Fisher. 2013. Making method visible: Improving the quality of science-based regulation. Michigan Journal of Environmental and Administrative Law 2(2):429–471.

Peterson, S. 2003. Barry Richmond, system dynamics and public policy. http://www.systemdynamics.org/conferences/2003/proceed/PAPERS/417.pdf (accessed September 9, 2015).

University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute. 2015. County Health Rankings 2014. www.countyhealthrankings.org (accessed September 15, 2015).

Wagner, W. E., E. C. Fisher, and P. Pascual. 2010. Misunderstanding models in environmental and public health regulation. NYU Environmental Law Journal 18(2):293–356.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. How Modeling Can Inform Strategies to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21807.
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Page 85
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. How Modeling Can Inform Strategies to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21807.
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In April 2015, the Institute of Medicine convened a workshop to explore the potential uses of simulation and other types of modeling for the purpose of selecting and refining potential strategies, ranging from interventions to investments, to improve the health of communities and the nation's health. Participants worked to identify how modeling could inform population health decision making based on lessons learned from models that have been, or have not been, used successfully, opportunities and barriers to incorporating models into decision making, and data needs and opportunities to leverage existing data and to collect new data for modeling. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions from this workshop.

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