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Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors (2016)

Chapter: Appendix C: Presentations and Visits

« Previous: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×

Appendix C

Presentations and Visits

WASHINGTON, DC, OCTOBER 23–24, 2014

  • History, Organization, and Goals of Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Conversion Program; Christopher Landers, Sr., Reactor Conversion Program Manager, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)/GTRI; Jeffrey Chamberlin, Director, GTRI Office of European and African Threat Reduction
  • GTRI Reactor Conversion Program Scope and Status; Jordi Roglans-Ribas, Director of the Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, and GTRI Program Manager
  • Regulatory Steps for Conversion of Reactors; Alexander Adams, Chief of Research and Test Reactors Licensing Branch, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
  • Main Challenges Facing Research Reactors; Pablo Adelfang, Research Reactor Section, International Atomic Energy Agency
  • Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Use in Russia; Pavel Podvig, Program on Science and Global Security, Princeton University; Member, International Panel on Fissile Materials
  • Challenges of High Performance Research Reactor Conversions; John Stevens, Manager of Research and Test Reactor Department, Argonne National Laboratory
  • Conversion Analyses for the MITR-II Reactor; Thomas Newton, Director of Reactor Operations and Associate Director, Reactor Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×

VIA CONFERENCE CALL, DECEMBER 3, 2014

  • GTRI Removal Program Overview; Sarah Dickerson, Acting Associate Assistant Deputy Administrator for Global Threat Reduction
  • Acceptance and Disposition of the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Spent Nuclear Fuel; Hitesh Nigam, Senior Environmental Engineer, Office of Nuclear Materials Disposition, DOE’s Office of Environmental Management

IDAHO FALLS, IDAHO, AND IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY, FEBRUARY 26–27, 2015

  • Irradiation Performance of U–Mo Alloy Based “Monolithic” Fuel, Including Past Fuel Decisions, Updates on RERTR-12 and AFIP-6, -6 II, and -7 Results; Mitchell (Mitch) Meyer, Fuel Development National Technical Lead, Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
  • Fabrication Process Selection Through the MP-1 Irradiation Test; Irina Glagolenko, Principal Investigator, Fuel Development Irradiation Experiment, INL
  • Plan for Research Reactor Fuel Qualification Including Base Fuel Qualification Plan and Requirements; Barry Rabin, Fuel Development National Technical Lead Deputy, INL
  • Overview of the Fuel Fabrication Capability and U-Mo Fabrication Process; Douglas Burkes, Fuel Fabrication Capability Pillar Lead, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)
  • Research and Development Approach for Fuel Fabrication: Challenges and Concerns; Douglas Burkes, PNNL
  • NNSA/NA-23 Fuel Development Program Technical Review Committee; Richard Hobbins, Independent Consultant

COLUMBIA, MISSOURI, APRIL 16–17, 2015

  • Material Management and Minimization’s (M3’s) International Fuel Development Collaborations Including HERACLES; Abdellatif Yacout, M3 European Fuel Development Technical Lead, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)
  • NNSA’s Russian Reactor Conversion Program: Historical Overview, Major Accomplishments, Current Status; Jordi RoglansRibas, Director of the Nuclear Engineering Division, Material Management and Minimization (M3) Program Manager, ANL
  • Risk-Based Management of Programs and Projects with Technical Uncertainties; Dave Maloney, Emeritus Technology Fellow, CH2MHill
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×
  • Discussion and Briefings on the Conversion of MURR Fuel; Ralph Butler, Executive Director of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) Center
  • Highlights of Findings and Recommendations from the Independent Strategic Review of the M3 Program; John Marra, Savannah River National Laboratory, Co-chair of M3’s Independent Strategic Review
  • High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Fuel Development Effort; Michael Itamura, Acting Technical Lead for Fuel Fabrication Capability Pillar, M3 Office, Sandia National Laboratories/National Nuclear Security Administration
  • Critical Success Factors for Managing High Risk Programs; William Madia, Stanford University, Co-chair of M3’s Independent Strategic Review

OTWOCK-ŚWIERK, POLAND, MAY 5, 2015

  • National Centre for Nuclear Research (in Polish, NCBJ); Grzegorz Wrochna, Director of NCBJ
  • History of MARIA conversion; Marek Migdal, Neutronic Calculations Specialist, NCBJ

GARCHING, GERMANY, MAY 7, 2015

  • The Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz-II reactor (FRM-II) Technische Universität München (TUM): Neutrons for Research, Industry and Medicine; Winfried Petry, Scientific Director, FRM-II
  • Conversion Studies of Reactor Core FRM-II; Anton Röhrmoser and Harald Breitkreutz, FRM-II
  • UMo Powder Production Process and Results; Rupert Schauer, FRM-II
  • Simulating In-Pile Radiation by Swift Heavy Ion Irradiation; Hsin-Yin Chiang, FRM-II
  • Materials Selection; Hsin-Yin Chiang, FRM-II
  • KP Implantation into Iodine Irradiated Monolithic U-Mo/Al Systems; Tobias Zweifel, FRM-II
  • Thermal Properties of Fresh and Spent U-Mo Fuels: An Overview; Tanja Huber, FRM-II
  • Manufacturing of Monolithic LEU Targets for Mo-99 Production; Tobias Hollmer, FRM-II
  • International Cooperation: TUM, HERACLES and U.S. DOE; Harald Breitkreutz, FRM-II
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×

MOL, BELGIUM, MAY 8, 2015

  • The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre: A Pioneer in Nuclear Research; Eric van Walle, Director-General, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie· Centre d’Etudes Nucléaire (SCK·CEN)
  • LEU UMo Dispersion Fuel: Past, Present, and Future—the Path to Fuel Qualification and Conversion; Sven Van den Berghe, Head of the Expert Group on Microstructural and Non-destructive Analysis, SCK·CEN
  • BR2 Introduction and Conversion; Geert Van den Branden, SCK·CEN

PETTEN, THE NETHERLANDS, MAY 11, 2015

  • NRG [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group] Welcome; Niels Unger, NRG Managing Director
  • Ten Years of LEU Fuel Use at the High Flux Reactor; Frodo Klaassen, HFR Fuel Management

GRENOBLE, FRANCE, MAY 12, 2015

  • U.S. National Academy of Sciences Committee Visit to ILL; W. G. Stirling, Director, ILL
  • ILL TOUTATIS Project (RHF Conversion); Yoann Calzavara, ILL
  • HERACLES: Highly Enriched European Reactors Action for Their Conversion in a Low Enriched Solution; Yoann Calzavara, ILL
  • PERSEUS; Yoann Calzavara, ILL

PARIS, FRANCE, MAY 13, 2015

  • AREVA/CERCA Overview; Dominique Geslin, Director, Marketing & Sales, Research Reactor Fuel (CERCA)
  • High Enriched Uranium Minimization in France; Pierre-Yves Thro, Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA)

WASHINGTON, DC, MAY 21, 2015

  • Uranium Supply and Demand; Parrish Staples, Director, Domestic Uranium Enrichment Program, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
  • Question and Answer Session with M3; Chris Landers, M3 Conversion Program Manager, NNSA
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×
  • Babcock & Wilcox Cost and Yield Review, NAS; Gunes Argon, Project Manager—Research Test Reactors, newly renamed Babcock and Wilcox Technologies (BWXT)

GAITHERSBURG, MD, MAY 22, 2015

  • Welcome and Introduction of the NCNR as a National User Facility; Rob Dimeo, Director, NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR)
  • Status and Planning for the NIST Reactor Conversion; Bob Williams, NCNR
  • Panel Discussion with NCNR Representatives

OAK RIDGE, TN, JUNE 24–26, 2015

  • Review of Research Reactor Fuel Development at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI); Jong-Man Park, Project Manager of Plate-Type Research Reactor Fuel Development and Advanced High Performance Research Reactor Fuel Development Projects, KAERI
  • Objectives and Constraints for Research Reactor Conversion Design: Assessing Alternatives; John Stevens, International Reactor Conversion Technical Lead and Manager of Research and Test Reactor Department, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)
  • Examples of Research Reactor Conversion Assessment of Alternatives; Benoit Dionne, Section Manager, Conversion Analysis and Methods, ANL
  • Progress Toward Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Fuel Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); David Renfro, HFIR LEU Fuel Conversion Project Manager, Research Reactors Division, UT-Battelle, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)
  • The Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) Pillar in FY16 and Beyond: Applied Engineering & Demonstration; Jared Wight, FFC Technical Pillar Lead, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
  • Current Status of and Progress Toward Eliminating Highly Enriched Uranium Use in Fuel for Civilian Research and Test Reactors; Hollie Longmire, Program Manager for LEU Applications, Y12 National Security Complex
  • Overview of Neutron Sources; Paul Langan, Associate Laboratory Director
  • Important Missions Beyond Neutron Scattering at HFIR; Chris Bryan
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×

MOSCOW, RUSSIA, JULY 13–14, 2015

  • Meeting with representatives of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS): V. Fortov, B. Myasoedov, Y. Shiyan, V. Ivanov, S. Yudintsev, B. Zhuikov, and A. Diakov from the Center for Arms Control, Moscow
    • — Discussion topics: HEU Minimization Within Research and Test Reactors (general discussion) and HEU Minimization Within Medical Isotope Production (general discussion)
    • — Production of Medical Radionuclides in Russia and Prospective Isotope Program in Institute for Nuclear Research, MoscowTroitsk, Boris Zhiukov
    • — Meeting at the RAS with President Fortov
  • HEU Minimization Efforts Within Rosatom; Nikolay Arkhangelsky, Director of Research Reactors, Rosatom
  • Russian Priorities in Civilian Nuclear Matters; Anton Khlopkov, Director of the Center for Energy and Security Studies

DIMITROVGRAD, RUSSIA, JULY 16–17, 2015

  • Strategic Planning for Research Reactors of State Scientific Centre “Research Institute of Atomic Reactors”; Alexey Izhutov, Deputy Director of RIAR, and Alexander Tuzov, Director of RIAR
  • A Comprehensive Analysis of the Technical Feasibility of the MIR. M1 Research Reactor Conversion to Low Enriched Uranium Fuel; S. Mainskov, RIAR
  • Development of Low Enriched Uranium Targets for 99Mo Production; V. Starkov, RIAR
  • JCS SCC RIAR Radionuclide Production Capabilities for Nuclear Medicine; Rostislav Kuznetsov, Director of Radioisotopes and 99Mo production, RIAR

VIENNA, AUSTRIA, JULY 27–29, 2015

  • International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB) Information on HEU Research Reactors and Critical Facilities; M. Voronov, F. Marshall, D. Ridikas, IAEA
  • Status of U.S. HEU Facilities and DOE/NNSA Conversion Activities; Jeff Chamberlin, Director, Office of Conversion, and Brian Waud, M3 Reactor Conversion Program, USA
  • Status of Russian HEU Facilities; Nikolay Arkhangelsky, Director of Research Reactors, Rosatom
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×
  • Status of French HEU Facilities; Pierre-Yves Thro, Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), France
  • Status of UK HEU Facilities; Richard Hardiman, Head of Programme, Global Threat Reduction Programme, UK
  • Civilian Reactor Facilities That Operate Using HEU Fuel; James (Jim) Matos, Argonne National Laboratory, USA

SITE VISITS

  • February 26, 2015: Visit to ATR, ATR-C, and TREAT, Idaho National Laboratory
  • April 16, 2015: Visit to University of Missouri Research Reactor
  • May 5–13, 2015: Visits to
    • — MARIA reactor, Otwock-Świerk, Poland
    • — Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Reactor (FRM-II), Garching, Germany
    • — Belgium Reactor-2 (BR2), Mol, Belgium
    • — High Flux Reactor (HFR), Petten, Netherlands
    • — Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble, France
  • May 20, 2015: Visit to BWXT, Lynchburg, VA, USA
  • May 22, 2015: Visit to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research, Gaithersburg, MD, USA
  • June 25, 2015: Visits to High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Facility, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Spallation Neutron Source, and Y-12 Fuel Fabrication Facility, Oak Ridge, TN, USA
  • July 16–17, 2015: Visit to Joint Stock Company “State Scientific Center—Research Institute of Atomic Reactors”( JSC “SSC RIAR” or simply “RIAR”), Dimitrovgrad, Russia
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×
Page 147
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×
Page 148
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×
Page 149
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×
Page 150
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×
Page 151
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×
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The continued presence of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in civilian installations such as research reactors poses a threat to national and international security. Minimization, and ultimately elimination, of HEU in civilian research reactors worldwide has been a goal of U.S. policy and programs since 1978. Today, 74 civilian research reactors around the world, including 8 in the United States, use or are planning to use HEU fuel. Since the last National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report on this topic in 2009, 28 reactors have been either shut down or converted from HEU to low enriched uranium fuel. Despite this progress, the large number of remaining HEU-fueled reactors demonstrates that an HEU minimization program continues to be needed on a worldwide scale. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors assesses the status of and progress toward eliminating the worldwide use of HEU fuel in civilian research and test reactors.

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