National Academies Press: OpenBook

Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks: 2015 Letter Report (2016)

Chapter: Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks: 2015 Letter Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21844.
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B

Committee Biographical Sketches

Carol E. H. Scott-Conner, M.D., Ph.D., M.B.A. (Chair), is professor emeritus in the Department of Surgery, University of Iowa, Iowa City. Dr. Scott-Conner received her undergraduate training in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and worked as an engineer before attending medical school at New York University (NYU). In 1976, she received her M.D. from NYU, where she also completed a residency in surgery. After leaving NYU, she joined the faculty at Marshall University and then moved to the University of Mississippi. During her tenure there, she earned a Ph.D. in anatomy from the University of Kentucky and an M.B.A. In 1995, she became professor and head of surgery at the University of Iowa. Dr. Scott-Conner has been active on 22 editorial boards and has written more than 200 original papers, abstracts, reviews, and book chapters. She is certified by the National Board of Medical Examiners and the American Board of Surgery and has a certification of added qualifications in surgical critical care. Dr. Scott-Conner has served on a number of Institute of Medicine committees, and she chairs the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine Standing Committee on Aerospace Medicine and the Medicine of Extreme Environments.

Daniel R. Masys, M.D. (Vice Chair), is an affiliate professor of biomedical and health informatics at the University of Washington School of Medicine, where he joined the Department of Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education in 2011. Previously, he served as a professor and the chair of the Department of Biomedical Informatics and a professor of medicine at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. An honors graduate of Princeton University and the Ohio State University College of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks: 2015 Letter Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21844.
×

Medicine, he completed postgraduate training in internal medicine, hematology, and medical oncology at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), and the Naval Regional Medical Center, San Diego. He served as chief of the International Cancer Research Data Bank of the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, and was director of the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, which is the computer research and development division of the National Library of Medicine. He also served as director of biomedical informatics at the UCSD School of Medicine, director of the UCSD Human Research Protections Program, and professor of medicine. Dr. Masys is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine (NAM). He is a diplomate of the American Board of Internal Medicine in medicine, hematology, and medical oncology. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and fellow and past president of the American College of Medical Informatics. Dr. Masys served as a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on Aerospace Medicine and the Medicine of Extreme Environments and chaired the 2008 IOM review of NASA’s Human Research Program evidence books.

Susan A. Bloomfield, Ph.D., earned her B.S. in biology at Oberlin College (Ohio) and her M.A. in physical education (exercise physiology) at the University of Iowa. After completing a Ph.D. (exercise physiology) at Ohio State University, Dr. Bloomfield joined the faculty in the Department of Health and Kinesiology at Texas A&M University in 1993, where she currently holds the rank of professor and is director of the Bone Biology Laboratory. In addition, she serves as assistant provost in the Texas A&M Office of Graduate and Professional Studies. Her research interests focus on the integrative physiology of bone, with specific reference to adaptations to disuse, microgravity, and caloric deficiency and how the sympathetic nervous system, altered blood flow, and endocrine factors modify those adaptations. Her more recent work has focused on the independent and combined effects of partial weight bearing and simulated space radiation on the integrity of bone and muscle, involving several experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Collaborations with muscle biologists have enabled definition of concurrent changes in muscle–bone pairs with disuse and/or radiation exposure. Her work has been funded by the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), the U.S. Department of Defense, and, currently, NASA’s Space

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks: 2015 Letter Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21844.
×

Biology Program. From 2000 to 2012, Dr. Bloomfield served as the associate lead for the Bone Loss (later, Musculoskeletal Alterations) Team within the NSBRI, and she has served on numerous NASA and European Space Agency review panels during the past 14 years. She is a member of the Texas A&M Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences graduate faculty and is an associate member of the Texas A&M University Health Sciences Center School of Graduate Studies.

C. Patrick Dunne, Ph.D., has a Ph.D. in biochemistry from Brandeis University and a B.A. in chemistry from the University of California, Riverside. Before joining the U.S. Army Research Center in Natick, Massachusetts, in 1979, Dr. Dunne was on the faculty at the University of Detroit and California State University at Long Beach; he also was a postdoctoral associate in biochemistry at Michigan State University. Dr. Dunne retired as the Senior Advisor in Advanced Processing and Nutritional Biochemistry for the Department of Defense Combat Feeding Project of the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Center of the Soldier and Biological Chemical Command in September 2012. Since 1991 he was the project officer of the Cold Preservation Project at Natick and has taken a lead role in dual use science and technology projects in advanced food processing technologies—pulsed electric field, high pressure and microwave processing. His research efforts in food biochemistry and nutritional biochemistry supported the development of improved rations for the military. Dr. Dunne was a founding member of the new Nonthermal Processing Division of the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT); he was elected the first chair of that division in 1999. He was the IFT Solberg Award winner in 2005 for fostering collaborations among academia, industry, and government researchers. He was named an IFT Fellow in 2009 and was one of the team of five who were given the IFT 2010 Research and Development Award for the microwave sterilization process. In 2014 Dr. Dunne was named the recipient of the IFT’s highest award, the Nicholas Appert Award; he was also awarded the Institute of Food Safety and Health Food Safety Award in 2011. Dr. Dunne maintains an active interest in science education; he was an elected member of the Framingham, Massachusetts, School Committee for 12 years.

Brad Holschuh, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of wearable technology and human factors at the University of Minnesota (UMN), and is co-director of the Wearable Technology Laboratory in the UMN College of Design. Dr. Holschuh earned his Ph.D. degree from the Department of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks: 2015 Letter Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21844.
×

Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and was a member of the inaugural class of NASA Space Technology Research Fellows. As a graduate student and postdoctoral associate in the MIT Man-Vehicle Laboratory, Dr. Holschuh focused on active materials development for mechanical counter-pressure space suits in partnership with the NASA Johnson Space Center. Dr. Holschuh’s current research focuses on topics related to wearable technologies to improve human performance both in space and on Earth. He is specifically interested in developing wearable smart systems using additive manufacturing, active materials, and onboard sensing and computing systems to address a variety of space, biomedical, military, and commercial challenges. His work encompasses wearable technology, aerospace engineering, materials science, human factors, textile engineering, and biomedical device development.

Michael J. Joyner, M.D., is a physician-researcher focused on human performance and exercise physiology. Using humans as his model system, he has made major contributions to understanding muscle and skin blood flow, blood pressure regulation, and human athletic performance. His ideas about human performance are widely quoted in both the popular media and scientific publications. Dr. Joyner has been a consultant to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and NASA and has held leadership positions with prestigious scientific journals. His research lab at Mayo Clinic has been continuously funded by the NIH since 1993. Mayo Clinic named him a Distinguished Investigator in 2010. His lab has provided significant educational opportunities for students and trainees, many of whom have established independent research programs at leading institutions throughout the world. Both his undergraduate (1981) and medical (1987) degrees are from the University of Arizona. Dr. Joyner completed his residency and research training at Mayo Clinic, where he continues to practice anesthesiology, has held numerous leadership positions, and is the Frank R. and Shari Caywood Professor of Anesthesiology.

James A. Pawelczyk, Ph.D., is an associate professor of physiology, kinesiology, and medicine at Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Pawelczyk served as a payload specialist on STS-90 Neurolab (April 17 to May 3, 1998); the experiments on board the space shuttle Columbia flight focused on the effects of microgravity on the brain and nervous system. Dr. Pawelczyk is a former member of the NASA Life Sciences Advisory

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks: 2015 Letter Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21844.
×

Subcommittee in the Office of Biological and Physical Research, and he served as a member of NASA’s ReMaP Task Force in 2002, which was charged with reprioritizing research on the space station. Dr. Pawelczyk’s research areas include central neural control of the cardiovascular system and compensatory mechanisms to conditioning and deconditioning. He received his M.S. in physiology from Pennsylvania State University and his Ph.D. in biology (physiology) from the University of North Texas. He chaired the National Research Council (NRC) Decadal Survey on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space: Integrative and Translational Research for the Human System Panel and chaired an Institute of Medicine (IOM) report on NASA’s directed research programs in 2012. He has served on several NRC and IOM committees and recently completed rotations on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Committee on Aerospace Medicine and the Medicine of Extreme Environments and the Academies Space Studies Board.

K. P. Sandeep, Ph.D., is Professor of Food Science in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at North Carolina State University. He received his doctorate from Pennsylvania State University. His primary research interests are in food engineering, specifically thermal/aseptic processing of particulate foods and various aspects of fluid mechanics and heat transfer.

Robert L. Satcher, Jr., M.D., Ph.D., is an assistant professor of surgical oncology at MD Anderson Cancer Center. He earned a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1993 and an M.D. from Harvard Medical School in 1994. His medical specialties are orthopedics and oncology, and he has done much work in treating bone cancer in adults and children. Selected as an astronaut candidate by NASA in 2004, he completed his training 2 years later. He was aboard the space shuttle Atlantis that journeyed to the International Space Station for almost 11 days in November 2009. Classified as a mission specialist, he studied the influence of zero gravity on muscles and bone density as well as the effects of space on the immune system. He also used his surgical training to install an antenna and help repair two robotic arms on the space station. Dr. Satcher is director of the eHealth Research Institute at Texas Medical Center and a member of the User Panel at the National Space and Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI). He is a frequent reviewer and adviser for medical issues related to spaceflight.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks: 2015 Letter Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21844.
×

Jack Stuster, Ph.D., is the vice president and principal scientist of Anacapa Sciences, Inc., a human factors and applied behavioral sciences research firm. He received a bachelor’s degree in experimental psychology from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a master’s and Ph.D. degrees in anthropology from the same institution. Dr. Stuster is a certified professional ergonomist, specializing in the measurement and enhancement of human performance in extreme environments. He has analyzed the tasks performed by U.S. Navy SEALs, SEAL delivery-vehicle pilots and navigators, explosive ordnance disposal technicians, crews of high-speed hovercraft, maintenance personnel, and military leaders. Dr. Stuster’s work for NASA began in 1982 with a systems analysis of space shuttle refurbishing procedures, which has been followed by studies of conditions on Earth that are analogous to those found on space missions. Dr. Stuster has been awarded fellow status by the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and the Borneo Research Society. He was a member of the Science Council of NASA’s Institute for Advanced Concepts and is now a member of the External Advisory Council of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute. He has also served on several government advisory groups, including the standing committee of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Board on Army Science and Technology to support the efforts of the Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization, for which he received a patriotic Civilian Service Commendation in 2011. He currently serves as the principal investigator of the Journals Flight Experiment and of the development of the Cultural Depot, an information-sharing system for use by special operations personnel.

Scott Trappe, Ph.D., is the director of the Human Performance Laboratory and John and Janice Fisher Endowed Chair in Exercise Science at Ball State University. Dr. Trappe earned his undergraduate training at the University of Northern Iowa (1989). He worked for U.S. Swimming at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs while conducting his graduate studies at the University of Colorado. His Ph.D. training was with Dr. David Costill at Ball State University (1994) and postdoctoral training in muscle physiology with Dr. Robert Fitts at Marquette University (1997). Dr. Trappe has been the principal investigator on several National Institutes of Health (NIH) and NASA human-based exercise physiology research projects. The aim of his research program is to connect biological and physiological measures at the cellular level with

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks: 2015 Letter Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21844.
×

whole body outcomes in response to acute and chronic exercise perturbations. For much of his career, Dr. Trappe has been working with NASA to help optimize the exercise prescription for astronauts. He has conducted several exercise training studies in older adults, aging athletes, and various college and elite athletes. Dr. Trappe has served on several NIH study sections and NASA committees, including the 2008 Institute of Medicine report on NASA’s human research program. He is a fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine and a member of the American Physiological Society.

Peter D. Wagner, M.D., is Distinguished Professor of Medicine & Bioengineering at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), in La Jolla, California. After obtaining his M.B., B.S., and B.Sc. (Medicine) degrees from Sydney University in 1968, he did postdoctoral work with Professor John West at UCSD. He then joined the UCSD medical faculty and has remained there to the present time. His research addresses the theoretical and experimental basis of oxygen transport and its limitations in the lungs and skeletal muscles in health and disease. A particular focus is on muscle capillary growth regulation using molecular biological approaches in integrated systems. He has served as a National Institutes of Health (NIH) study section member and chair, associate editor of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, and associate editor of the Journal of Applied Physiology. He was president of the American Thoracic Society 2005-2006, and was president of the American Physiological Society 2010-2011. Current major responsibilities include serving as editor of the Journal of Applied Physiology, editor of two sections of Comprehensive Physiology, chair of an NIH study section, and treasurer of the International Union of Physiological Sciences. He has published more than 350 peer-reviewed research articles and more than 120 invited chapters and other contributions.

Gayle E. Woloschak, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Radiology at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University. Her research interests include studies of the molecular biology of lymphocyte and motor neuron abnormalities in DNA repair–deficient mice, studies of radiation-inducible nanoparticles, and the analysis of molecular mechanisms of oncogenesis in radiation-induced tumors. She received her Ph.D. in medical sciences (microbiology) from the Medical College of Ohio and did postdoctoral training in the departments of immunology and molecular biology at the Mayo Clinic. Dr. Woloschak was a senior

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks: 2015 Letter Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21844.
×

molecular biologist and group leader of the Biosciences Division at Argonne National Laboratory, and a senior fellow at the Nanosciences Consortium of Argonne National Laboratory–University of Chicago. She has served as a member on the National Institutes of Health’s radiation study section and on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Committee on the Evaluation of Radiation Shielding for Space Exploration, and she has chaired NASA’s peer-review radiation biology committee.

Laurence R. Young, Sc.D., is professor of astronautics and professor of health sciences and technology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He was the founding director (1997-2001) of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute. Dr. Young is a full member of the International Academy of Astronautics. He received an A.B. from Amherst College; a certificate in applied mathematics from the Sorbonne in Paris, as a French government fellow; and S.B. and S.M. degrees in electrical engineering and an Sc.D. in instrumentation from MIT. He joined the MIT faculty in 1962 and co-founded the Man Vehicle Laboratory, which does research on the visual and vestibular systems, visual-vestibular interaction, flight simulation, space motion sickness, and manual control and displays. In 1991, Dr. Young was selected as a payload specialist for Spacelab Life Sciences 2. He spent 2 years in training at the Johnson Space Center and served as alternate payload specialist during the October 1993 mission. He was chairman of the Harvard–MIT Committee on Biomedical Engineering and Physics and the interdepartmental Ph.D. program in biomedical engineering, and he directs the Harvard–MIT Program in Bioastronautics. Dr. Young is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and the National Academy of Engineering and has served on many National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine committees, including the Committee on Aerospace Medicine and the Medicine of Extreme Environments.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks: 2015 Letter Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21844.
×
Page 65
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks: 2015 Letter Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21844.
×
Page 66
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks: 2015 Letter Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21844.
×
Page 67
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks: 2015 Letter Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21844.
×
Page 68
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks: 2015 Letter Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21844.
×
Page 69
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks: 2015 Letter Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21844.
×
Page 70
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks: 2015 Letter Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21844.
×
Page 71
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks: 2015 Letter Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21844.
×
Page 72
Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks: 2015 Letter Report Get This Book
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Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks 2015 Letter Report is the third in a series of five reports from the Institute of Medicine that will independently review more than 30 evidence reports that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has compiled on human health risks for long-duration and exploration space flights. This report builds on the 2008 IOM report Review of NASA's Human Research Program Evidence Books: A Letter Report, which provided an initial and brief review of the evidence reports.

This letter report reviews seven evidence reports and examines the quality of the evidence, analysis, and overall construction of each report; identifies existing gaps in report content; and provides suggestions for additional sources of expert input. The report analyzes each evidence report's overall quality, which included readability; internal consistency; the source and breadth of cited evidence; identification of existing knowledge and research gaps; authorship expertise; and, if applicable, response to recommendations from the 2008 IOM letter report.

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