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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Privacy Research and Best Practices: Summary of a Workshop for the Intelligence Community. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21879.
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C

Biographical Sketches

WORKSHOP STEERING COMMITTEE

FRED H. CATE, Steering Committee Chair, is a distinguished professor and C. Ben Dutton Professor of Law at the Indiana University Maurer School of Law. He is managing director of the Center for Law, Ethics, and Applied Research in Health Information, and a senior fellow and former founding director of the Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research. Professor Cate specializes in information privacy and security law issues. He has testified before numerous congressional committees and speaks frequently before professional, industry, and government groups. He is a senior policy advisor to the Centre for Information Policy Leadership at Hunton & Williams LLP, a member of Intel’s Privacy and Security External Advisory Board, the Department of Homeland Security Data Privacy and Integrity Committee Cybersecurity Subcommittee, the National Security Agency’s (NSA’s) Privacy and Civil Liberties Panel, the board of directors of The Privacy Projects, the board of directors of the International Foundation for Online Responsibility, and the board of directors of the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction. Previously, Professor Cate served as a member of the Committee on Technical and Privacy Dimensions of Information for Terrorism Prevention of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, counsel to the Department of Defense Technology and Privacy Advisory Committee, reporter for the third report of the Markle Task Force on National Security in the Information Age, and a member of the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC’s) Advisory Committee on Online Access and Security and Microsoft’s Trustworthy Computing Academic Advisory Board. He chaired the International Telecommunication Union’s High-Level Experts on Electronic Signatures and Certification Authorities. He served as the privacy editor for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ (IEEE’s) Security & Privacy and is one of the founding editors of the Oxford University Press journal International Data Privacy Law. He is the author of more than 150 books and articles, and he appears frequently in the popular press. Professor Cate attended Oxford University and received his J.D. and his A.B. with honors and distinction from Stanford University. He is a senator and fellow (and immediate past president) of the Phi Beta Kappa Society, an elected member of the American Law Institute, and a fellow of the American Bar Foundation.

FREDERICK R. CHANG is the director of the Darwin Deason Institute for Cyber Security, the Bobby B. Lyle Endowed Centennial Distinguished Chair in Cyber Security, and professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering in the Lyle School of Engineering at Southern Methodist University (SMU). He is also a senior fellow in the John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies in SMU’s Dedman College, and a distinguished scholar in the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law at the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Chang’s career spans service in the private sector, in academia, and in government, including as the former director of research at the NSA. Dr. Chang has been awarded the NSA Director’s Distinguished Service Medal and was the 2014 Information Security Magazine ‘Security 7’ award winner for education. He has served as a member of the Commission on Cyber Security for the 44th Presidency and as a member of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the Academies. He has also served as a member of the Academies’ Committee on Responding to Section 5(d) of Presidential Policy Directive 28: The Feasibility of Software to Provide Alternatives to Bulk Signals Intelligence Collection. He twice served as a cyber security expert witness at hearings convened by the U.S. House of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Privacy Research and Best Practices: Summary of a Workshop for the Intelligence Community. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21879.
×

Representatives’ Committee on Science, Space and Technology. Dr. Chang received his B.A. from the University of California, San Diego, and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Oregon. He has also completed the Program for Senior Executives at the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

TADAYOSHI KOHNO is the Short-Dooley Professor of the Computer Science and Engineering Department at the University of Washington and an adjunct associate professor in the university’s Information School. His research focuses on computer security and privacy, broadly defined, with a particular focus on computer security and privacy for emerging and consumer technologies; computer security and privacy for mobile and cloud systems; the human element in computer security systems; and computer security education. Originally trained in applied cryptography, his current research thrusts range from secure cyber-physical systems to cloud computing. Dr. Kohno is the recipient of a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award, an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, an MIT Technology Review TR-35 Young Innovator Award, and multiple best paper awards. He is a member of the Defense Science Study Group and a founding member of the IEEE Symposium on Secure Design and the USENIX Security Steering Committee. He received his Ph.D. in computer science from the University of California, San Diego.

SUSAN LANDAU is professor of cybersecurity policy in the Department of Social Science and Policy Studies at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Dr. Landau has been a senior staff privacy analyst at Google, a distinguished engineer at Sun Microsystems, and a faculty member at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and at Wesleyan University. She has held visiting positions at Harvard University, Cornell University, Yale University, and the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute. Dr. Landau is the author of Surveillance or Security? The Risks Posed by New Wiretapping Technologies (2011) and co-author, with Whitfield Diffie, of Privacy on the Line: The Politics of Wiretapping and Encryption (1998, rev. ed. 2007). She has written numerous computer science and public policy papers and op-eds on cybersecurity and encryption policy and testified in Congress on the security risks of wiretapping and on cybersecurity activities at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Information Technology Laboratory. She currently serves on the Computer Science Telecommunications Board of the Academies. A 2015 Inductee to the Cybersecurity Hall of Fame and a 2012 Guggenheim fellow, Dr. Landau was a 2010-2011 fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, the recipient of the 2008 Women of Vision Social Impact Award, and also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). She received her B.A. from Princeton University, her M.S. from Cornell University, and her Ph.D. from MIT.

HELEN NISSENBAUM is professor of media, culture and communication, and computer science at New York University (NYU), where she is also director of the Information Law Institute. Dr. Nissenbaum’s work spans social, ethical, and political dimensions of information technology and digital media. She has written and edited eight books, including Privacy, Big Data and the Public Good: Frameworks for Engagement, with J. Lane, V. Stodden and S. Bender (2014), Values at Play in Digital Games, with M. Flanagan (2014), and Privacy in Context: Technology, Policy, and the Integrity of Social Life (2010) and her research publications have appeared in journals of philosophy, politics, law, media studies, information studies, and computer science. NSF, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the Ford Foundation, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of the National Coordinator have supported her work on privacy, trust online, and security, as well as several studies of values embodied in computer system design, search engines, digital games, facial recognition technology, and health information systems. Before joining the faculty at NYU, she served as associate director of the Center for Human Values at Princeton University. Dr. Nissenbaum received a Ph.D. in philosophy from Stanford University in 1983 and a B.A. (Hons) from the University of the Witwatersrand.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Privacy Research and Best Practices: Summary of a Workshop for the Intelligence Community. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21879.
×

INVITED PANELISTS AND SPEAKERS

IDRIS ADJERID is an assistant professor of management at the Mendoza College of Business at the University of Notre Dame. His research focuses on the economics of personal information with a particular focus on the behavioral economics of privacy decision making and data ethics. Dr. Adjerid’s work has been published in Management Science, the IEEE Journal on Privacy and Security, and a number of conference proceedings and has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Wired.com, and several other news outlets. He received a Ph.D. in information systems from the Heinz College of Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University, and both an M.B.A. and B.S. in business information technology from the Pamplin College of Business at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

STEVEN M. BELLOVIN is the Percy K. and Vidal L. W. Hudson Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University, where he does research on networks, security, and especially why the two don’t get along, as well as related public policy issues. In his copious spare professional time, he does some work on the history of cryptography. Dr. Bellovin joined the faculty in 2005 after many years at Bell Labs and AT&T Labs Research, where he was an AT&T fellow. He received a B.A. from Columbia University and an M.S. and Ph.D. in computer science from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. While a graduate student, he helped create Netnews; for this, he and the other creators were given the 1995 Usenix Lifetime Achievement Award (“The Flame”). Dr. Bellovin has served as chief technologist of the FTC. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and is serving on the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the Academies. He is a past member of the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Advisory Committee and the Technical Guidelines Development Committee of the Election Assistance Commission; he also received the 2007 NIST/NSA National Computer Systems Security Award and has been elected to the Cybersecurity Hall of Fame. Dr. Bellovin is the coauthor of Firewalls and Internet Security: Repelling the Wily Hacker and holds a number of patents on cryptographic and network protocols. He has served on many Academies study committees, including those on information systems trustworthiness, the privacy implications of authentication technologies, and cybersecurity research needs; he was also a member of the information technology subcommittee of a study group on science versus terrorism. He was a member of the Internet Architecture Board from 1996 until 2002; he was co-director of the Security Area of the Internet Engineering Task Force from 2002 through 2004.

ROXANA GEAMBASU is an assistant professor of computer science at Columbia University. She joined Columbia in the fall of 2011 after finishing her Ph.D. at the University of Washington. For her work in cloud and mobile data privacy, she received a Microsoft Research Faculty Fellowship, a “Brilliant 10” Popular Science nomination, an NSF CAREER award (all in 2014); an Honorable Mention for the inaugural Dennis M. Ritchie Doctoral Dissertation Award in 2013, a William Chan Dissertation Award in 2012, two best paper awards at top systems conferences (2009 and 2011), and the first Google Ph.D. fellowship in cloud computing (2009).

JENNIFER GLASGOW has provided oversight of Acxiom Corporation’s global public policy, privacy, and information practices since 1991. She currently directs Acxiom’s global information use policy, internal compliance with legal regulations and industry guidelines, consumer affairs, government affairs, and related public relations. In 2010 she was recognized by the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP) as the profession’s first Chief Privacy Officer and in 2011 was IAPP’s Vanguard winner, the highest recognition given by the association of over 20,000 members for her leadership, knowledge, and involvement in the profession. She is extremely active domestically and internationally consulting with clients and advising policy makers, regulators, and government agencies about the appropriate use of personal information. She has participated in numerous international efforts to influence the development of public policy, develop industry best practices, and achieve maximum harmonization across the world. Ms. Glasgow is also a regular speaker in a variety of industries, including financial services, retail, insurance, publishing, travel and entertainment, and government use of information. She is currently active on a variety of industry

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Privacy Research and Best Practices: Summary of a Workshop for the Intelligence Community. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21879.
×

boards and councils and sits on the U.S. Direct Marketing Association Safe Harbor Ethics Committee and co-chairs the Mobile Marketing Association’s Privacy and Advocacy Committee. Ms. Glasgow is board member for the Foundation for Information Accountability and Governance organization and sits on the advisory board for the Political and Economic Research Council and lectures at the University of Texas, Austin, George Mason University, and the University of Arkansas on the subject of privacy. Ms. Glasgow joined Acxiom after receiving a degree in mathematics and computer science from the University of Texas, Austin, and helping develop and install a criminal justice highway safety information system for the State of Arkansas. She is active with her alma mater as a member of the UT Chancellor’s Council and the College of Natural Science Foundation Advisory Council. She has also been elected to the Arkansas Academy of Computing.

CARL GUNTER is a professor of computer science at the University of Illinois, where he also serves as a professor in the College of Medicine and as director for the Illinois Security Lab and the Health Information Technology Center. His interests concern security and privacy, especially in specific application domains. His recent work has centered on the electric power grid and health care. He has also contributed to research and teaching in the areas of programming languages, formal methods, and networking.

ALEXANDER W. JOEL is the civil liberties protection officer for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI). In that capacity, he leads the ODNI’s Civil Liberties and Privacy Office, and reports directly to the Director of National Intelligence. His responsibilities include ensuring that the protection of privacy and civil liberties is appropriately incorporated in Intelligence Community policies and procedures, overseeing compliance by the ODNI with privacy and civil liberties laws, reviewing complaints of possible abuses of privacy and civil liberties in programs and operations administered by the ODNI, and ensuring that the use of technology sustains, and does not erode, privacy. His appointment to this position was announced by Director John Negroponte on December 7, 2005. Mr. Joel had previously been performing the duties of that position on an interim basis. He has more than a decade of experience with privacy, technology, and national security law. He was motivated to enter public service following 9/11. He joined the Central Intelligence Agency’s Office of General Counsel in October 2002, where he provided legal advice relating to intelligence activities. Prior to joining the government, Mr. Joel served as the privacy, technology, and e-commerce attorney for Marriott International, Inc., where he helped establish and implement Marriott’s global privacy compliance program, including the creation of Marriott’s first privacy officer position. Before that, he worked as a technology attorney at the law firm of Shaw, Pittman, Potts & Trowbridge in Washington, D.C. (now Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman), and as a U.S. Army Judge Advocate General Corps officer, with assignments that included prosecutor and criminal defense counsel. Mr. Joel received his law degree from the University of Michigan in 1987, magna cum laude, where he was a member of the Michigan Law Review. He received his B.A. degree from Princeton University in 1984, magna cum laude.

MARK McGOVERN is the CEO of Mobile System 7, an award winning enterprise security startup and the leader in identity behavior analytics. He is a respected security industry professional, with a 25-year track record developing and deploying innovative security products for different enterprises. Prior to founding Mobile System 7, Mr. McGovern was vice president of technology for In-Q-Tel, where he led security investments for the U.S. Intelligence Community. In this role, he identified, developed, and deployed emerging security technologies to address strategic enterprise needs. Mr. McGovern’s investments included: ArcSight, Corestreet, SilverTail Systems, FireEye, Red Seal Systems, and Veracode. Prior to joining In-Q-Tel, he was director of technology for Cigital, Inc. He led Cigital’s Software Security Group and supported Fortune 100 clientele, including Microsoft, MasterCard International, CitiBank, and the Federal Reserve Banks of Richmond, New York, and Boston. Earlier in his career, Mr. McGovern worked as an engineer for the Central Intelligence Agency. He holds a B.S. in electrical engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute and an M.S. in systems engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Privacy Research and Best Practices: Summary of a Workshop for the Intelligence Community. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21879.
×

ROB SHERMAN is the deputy chief privacy officer at Facebook, where he is responsible for managing the company’s engagement on public policy issues surrounding privacy, security, and online trust. Collaborating with Facebook’s product teams, regulators, and other key stakeholders, Mr. Sherman works to build the company’s core commitments to transparency, control, and accountability into every aspect of the Facebook service. He joined Facebook from Covington & Burling LLP, where he represented Facebook and other leading technology and digital media companies on regulatory and public policy issues relating to privacy, data security, electronic marketing and communications, and digital content. While in private practice, Mr. Sherman was recognized by Chambers USA as one of the nation’s leading media regulatory lawyers.

FUMING SHIH is a senior product manager at Oracle Cloud working on the Cloud governance project. Dr. Shih graduated from the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in 2014. His research is about privacy and accountability for collection and uses of personal data, especially those from our connected personal devices. The work involves understanding human behavior in privacy, modeling people’s preferences for disclosing personal data, and developing tools to support user-centric privacy framework. Part of his research is now seen in the privacy features implemented on Apple’s iPhone.

JESSICA STADDON is joining the Computer Science Department of North Carolina State University as associate professor and director of privacy. Previously, Dr. Staddon was a research scientist and manager at Google, an area manager at Xerox PARC, and a research scientist at Bell Labs and RSA Labs. Her interests include usable security and privacy tools, trends in privacy-related attitudes, and methods for measuring and predicting privacy-related behaviors, attitudes, and risks. She serves regularly on the program committees of ACM and IEEE-sponsored security/privacy conferences and is on the editorial boards of the Journal of Computer Security and the International Journal of Information and Computer Security and the advisory board of the Association for Women in Mathematics. She holds a Ph.D. in mathematics from University of California (UC), Berkeley.

KATHERINE STRANDBURG concentrates her teaching and research in information privacy law and in innovation law and policy, focusing on the interplay between social behavior and technological change. She has authored several amicus briefs to the U.S. Supreme Court and federal appellate courts dealing with patent law and privacy issues and was invited to speak at the Privacy and Civil Liberty Oversight Board’s public meeting on Executive Order 12333 in May 2014. Recent articles include “Free Fall: The Online Market’s Consumer Preference Disconnect,” and “Membership Lists, Metadata and Freedom of Association’s Specificity Requirement.” In 2014, she published the book Governing Knowledge Commons (co-edited with Brett Frischmann and Michael Madison). She co-leads NYU’s interdisciplinary Privacy Research Group with Helen Nissenbaum. Dr. Strandburg obtained her J.D. with high honor from the University of Chicago Law School and served as a law clerk to the Honorable Richard D. Cudahy of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. Prior to her legal career, Dr. Strandburg was a physicist at Argonne National Laboratory, having received her Ph.D. from Cornell University and conducted postdoctoral research at Carnegie Mellon University.

LEE TIEN is a senior staff attorney and Adams Chair for Internet Rights at the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF). Mr. Tien began working in the area of cyberlaw in 1991, developing the first successful First Amendment theory in the Bernstein/Junger crypto export control cases in the mid-1990s. He joined EFF in 2000, working on FOIA (Freedom of Information Act) and First Amendment Issues. After September 11, 2001, his emphasis shifted to electronic surveillance law, including pen/trap, the Wiretap Act, the Stored Communications Act, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, and Fourth Amendment issues. He currently focuses on privacy, surveillance, and security, managing most of EFF’s legislative work in these areas. He has been part of EFF’s NSA reform litigation teams since 2006. He also works on issues related to commercial privacy and security, including big data; Do Not Track, and online behavioral advertising; electronic health records; biometrics; energy usage data and the smart grid; road usage charging, congestion pricing, and vehicle-to-vehicle communication; and the Internet of Things. Mr. Tien received his undergraduate degree in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Privacy Research and Best Practices: Summary of a Workshop for the Intelligence Community. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21879.
×

psychology from Stanford University, where he was very active in journalism at the Stanford Daily. After working as a news reporter at the Tacoma News Tribune for a year, he went to law school at Boalt Hall at University of California, Berkeley. Mr. Tien also did graduate work in the Program in Jurisprudence and Social Policy at University of California, Berkeley.

JOSEPH TUROW is Robert Lewis Shayon Professor of Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication. Professor Turow is an elected fellow of the International Communication Association and was presented with a Distinguished Scholar Award by the National Communication Association. In 2012, the TRUSTe Internet privacy-management organization designated him a “privacy pioneer” for his research and writing on marketing and digital-privacy. His forthcoming book with Yale University Press explores how retailers are using mobile devices to replicate internet-like surveillance and data gathering in physical stores. He has authored 10 books, edited 5, and written more than 150 articles on mass media industries. Among his books are The Daily You: How the New Advertising Industry Is Defining Your Identity and Your Worth (2012); Niche Envy: Marketing Discrimination in the Digital Age (2006); Breaking Up America: Advertisers and the New Media World (1997; paperback, 1999; Chinese edition, 2004); and The Hyperlinked Society: Questioning Connections in the Digital Age (edited with Lokman Tsui, 2008). In 2010, the University of Michigan Press published Playing Doctor: Television, Storytelling, and Medical Power, a history of prime time TV and the sociopolitics of medicine, and in 2013 it won the McGovern Health Communication Award from the University of Texas College of Communication. Mr. Turow’s continuing national surveys of the American public on issues relating to marketing, new media, and society have received a great deal of attention in the popular press, as well as in the research community. He has written about media and advertising for the popular press, including American Demographics magazine, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, and The Los Angeles Times. His research has received financial support from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Kaiser Family Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Federal Communications Commission, and the National Endowment for the Humanities, among others. Mr. Turow was awarded a Lady Astor Lectureship by Oxford University. He has received several conference paper and book awards and has lectured widely. He was invited to give the McGovern Lecture at the University of Texas College of Communication, the Pockrass Distinguished Lecture at Penn State University, and the Chancellor’s Distinguished Lecture at Louisiana State University. He currently serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, Poetics and Media Industries.

DAVID C. VLADECK is a professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he teaches federal courts, civil procedure, administrative law, and seminars on First Amendment litigation and privacy. He also serves as faculty director for the law school’s Center on Privacy and Technology. Professor Vladeck recently returned to the law school after serving for nearly 4 years as the director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. Before joining the law school faculty full-time in 2002, he spent more than 25 years with Public Citizen Litigation Group, a national public interest law firm, supervising and handling complex litigation. He has briefed and argued a number of cases before the U.S. Supreme Court and more than 60 cases before federal courts of appeal and state courts of last resort. He is a senior fellow of the Administrative Conference of the United States, an elected member of the American Law Institute, and an appointed member of the Academies’ Committee on Law, Science and Technology. He serves on the boards of the Natural Resources Defense Council and the National Consumers Law Center. Professor Vladeck frequently testifies before Congress and writes on privacy, consumer protection, administrative law, and First Amendment issues.

JAMES L. WAYMAN received a Ph.D. in engineering from the University of California, Santa Barbara, in 1980. In 1981, he joined the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School as an adjunct and research professor of mathematics. In 1986, he became a contractor to the U.S. Department of Defense in the areas of biometrics and technical security. In 1995, he joined San José State University to head the Biometric Identification Research Center, which was named by the Clinton administration as the “U.S. National Biometric Test Center,” from 1997 until 2000. He has been a member of two committees of the Computer Science and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Privacy Research and Best Practices: Summary of a Workshop for the Intelligence Community. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21879.
×

Telecommunications Board of the Academies (Authentication Technologies and Their Privacy Implications and Whither Biometrics?) and served for 4 years on the Panel on Information Technology. He is currently vice chair of the Department of Justice/NIST Organization of Scientific Area Committees’ Subcommittee on Speaker Recognition, an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer, and a fellow of the IEEE and the Institution of Engineering and Technology.

TAO ZHANG, an IEEE fellow and Cisco Distinguished Engineer, joined Cisco in 2012 as the chief scientist for Smart Connected Vehicles and has since also been leading initiatives to develop strategies, architectures, technology, and eco-systems for the Internet of Things and Fog Computing at Cisco Systems. Prior to joining Cisco, he was chief scientist and director of Mobile and Vehicular Networking at Telcordia Technologies (formerly Bellcore). For more than 25 years, he has been directing research and product development in broadband, mobile, and vehicular networks. His leadership and technical work have resulted in new technology, standards, and products. Dr. Zhang has co-authored two books, Vehicle Safety Communications: Protocols, Security, and Privacy (2012) and IP-Based Next Generation Wireless Networks (2004). He holds 49 U.S. patents and has published more than 70 peer-reviewed technical papers. He was a founding board director of the Connected Vehicle Trade Association. He has been serving on the industry advisory boards for several research organizations. He was the founding general chair and the steering committee vice chair for the international conference series CollaborateCom, which has now evolved into the IEEE Collaboration and Internet Computing Conference. Dr. Zhang is chair of the IEEE Communications Society Technical Sub-Committee on Vehicular Networks and Telematics Applications. He has been serving on editorial boards or as a guest editor for multiple IEEE and other technical journals, including the IEEE Internet of Things (IoT) Journal, IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology, IEEE Journal of Selected Areas in Communications, and the Springer Journal of Wireless Networks. Dr. Zhang was also an adjunct professor at multiple universities.

ACADEMIES STAFF

EMILY GRUMBLING, a program officer with the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the Academies, directed the Workshop on Privacy for the Intelligence Community. Since joining CSTB in 2014, Dr. Grumbling has also served as study director for the Committee on Information Technology, Automation, and the U.S. Workforce and as staff to the Academies’ Forum on Cyber Resilience. She previously served as an AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow in the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering at NSF (2012-2014), and an American Chemical Society (ACS) Congressional Fellow in the U.S. House of Representatives (2011-2012). Dr. Grumbling currently serves as a volunteer Associate of the ACS Committee on Environmental Improvement. She received her Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of Arizona in 2010 and her B.A. with a double-major in chemistry and film/electronic media arts from Bard College in 2004.

JON EISENBERG is director of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the Academies. He has also been study director for a diverse body of work, including a series of studies exploring Internet and broadband policy and networking and communications technologies. From 1995 until 1997, he was an AAAS Science, Engineering, and Diplomacy Fellow at the U.S. Agency for International Development, where he worked on technology transfer and information and telecommunications policy issues. Dr. Eisenberg received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Washington in 1996 and B.S. in physics with honors from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, in 1988.

SHENAE BRADLEY is an administrative assistant at the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the Academies. She currently provides support for multiple projects, including Continuing Innovation in Information Technology; Information Technology, Automation, and the U.S. Workforce; and Towards 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education, to name a few. Prior to this, she served as a senior project

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Privacy Research and Best Practices: Summary of a Workshop for the Intelligence Community. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21879.
×

assistant with the board. Prior to coming to the Academies, she managed a number of apartment rental communities for Edgewood Management Corporation in the Maryland/DC/Delaware metropolitan areas.

LIZ EULLER is a senior program assistant for the Academies’ Board on Energy and Environmental Systems. She currently provides support for studies focused on energy technology and policy assessments. She worked previously for the Environmental Law Institute, The Wilderness Society, the Chicago Botanic Garden, and the University of Chicago Survey Lab. Ms. Euller has a B.A. in history from the University of Chicago.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Privacy Research and Best Practices: Summary of a Workshop for the Intelligence Community. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21879.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Privacy Research and Best Practices: Summary of a Workshop for the Intelligence Community. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21879.
×
Page 49
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Privacy Research and Best Practices: Summary of a Workshop for the Intelligence Community. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21879.
×
Page 50
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Privacy Research and Best Practices: Summary of a Workshop for the Intelligence Community. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21879.
×
Page 51
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Privacy Research and Best Practices: Summary of a Workshop for the Intelligence Community. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21879.
×
Page 52
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Privacy Research and Best Practices: Summary of a Workshop for the Intelligence Community. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21879.
×
Page 53
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Privacy Research and Best Practices: Summary of a Workshop for the Intelligence Community. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21879.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Privacy Research and Best Practices: Summary of a Workshop for the Intelligence Community. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21879.
×
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Next: Appendix D: Acronyms and Abbreviations »
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Recent disclosures about the bulk collection of domestic phone call records and other signals intelligence programs have stimulated widespread debate about the implications of such practices for the civil liberties and privacy of Americans. In the wake of these disclosures, many have identified a need for the intelligence community to engage more deeply with outside privacy experts and stakeholders.

At the request of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop to address the privacy implications of emerging technologies, public and individual preferences and attitudes toward privacy, and ethical approaches to data collection and use. This report summarizes discussions between experts from academia and the private sector and from the intelligence community on private sector best practices and privacy research results.

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