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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B; Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Effects of the Deletion of Chemical Agent Washout on Operations at the Blue Grass Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21884.
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B

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

GARY S. GROENEWOLD, Chair, is a scientific fellow in the Energy and Environment Directorate at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), where he has conducted research in surface chemistry, gas-phase chemistry, and analytical measurement since 1991. His research has focused on determining speciation and reactivity of radioactive and toxic metals (U, Np, Pu, Hg) and of toxic organic compounds (including VX, mustard, and sarin). Prior to 1991, Dr. Groenewold served in line management at the INL and as the technical leader for the organic analysis group. Before coming to the INL, he worked in anticancer drug discovery for Bristol-Myers and conducted research in surface chemistry during a postdoctoral fellowship at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He received a Ph.D. in chemistry at the University of Nebraska in 1983, where he studied ion molecule condensation and elimination reactions under the direction of Michael Gross. He has authored more than 130 research articles in these areas and has served on several ad hoc committees for the National Research Council (NRC).1 He currently chairs the standing Committee on Chemical Demilitarization for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

HEREK L. CLACK is a research associate professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Michigan. Previously, he was an associate professor in the Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department at the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT). He received his B.S. in aeronautical and astronautical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT; 1987) and his M.S. (1997) and Ph.D. (1998) degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Prior to joining the IIT faculty, Dr. Clack was an NRC postdoctoral fellow in residence at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, Maryland (1998-1999), and a member of the technical staff at the Rocketdyne Division of Boeing Corporation (1987-1992). He is engaged in research and publication in the general area of transport phenomena within dispersions. In particular, his research addresses combustion of droplets and sprays and mercury emissions from combustion.

RICHARD C. FLAGAN is the Irma and Ross McCollum/ William H. Corcoran Professor of Chemical Engineering and chair of the faculty at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The author of more than 340 journal articles and one book, Dr. Flagan holds 23 patents for developments in aerosol instrumentation and materials processing. His work has been honored by the Fuchs Award, jointly administered by the American Association for Aerosol Research, Gesellschaft für Aerosolforschung, and the Japan Associate for Aerosol Science and Technology; the Award for Creative Advances in Science and Technology of the American Chemical Society; and the Thomas Baron Award of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, among others. Dr. Flagan is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). He received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan in 1969 and his Ph.D., also in mechanical engineering, from MIT in 1973. Dr. Flagan joined the Caltech faculty in 1975 and developed an internationally recognized research program in environmental and nonenvironmental aerosols.

REBECCA A. HAFFENDEN currently serves part-time as a program’s attorney at Argonne National Laboratory. Her recent professional work has included work for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to evaluate legislation and regulations associated with security vulnerabilities and providing legal expertise to programs involving federal facility site remediation and hazardous waste compliance and corrective actions. Ms. Haffenden also coauthored a working paper on the application of federal and state hazardous waste regulatory programs to waste chemical agents, in addition to

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1 Activities of the National Research Council are now referred to as activities of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B; Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Effects of the Deletion of Chemical Agent Washout on Operations at the Blue Grass Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21884.
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being a co-author of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Assembled Chemical Weapons Alternates program. She received a B.A. in psychology from the University of Illinois and J.D. from Suffolk Law School, Boston, Massachusetts.

THOM J. HODGSON is a Distinguished University Professor in the Edward P. Fitts Industrial and Systems Engineering Department at North Carolina State University. Dr. Hodgson’s research has focused on scheduling and logistics. The problem areas run the gamut from classic job shop scheduling, to specific industrial scheduling problems, to supply chain issues, to military logistics and operational problems. Dr. Hodgson is a member of the NAE, the Institute of Industrial Engineers, and the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences. He earned his B.S.E. in science engineering in 1961, his M.B.A. in quantitative methods in 1965, and his Ph.D. in industrial engineering in 1970, all from the University of Michigan.

MURRAY G. LORD is director of Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) in the EH&S Operations Technology Center at Dow Chemical Company. He is responsible for research program for technology development for Global Environmental Operations, which includes project areas in process optimization, technology development, and capital project execution. Mr. Lord has experience in project areas across multiple business and technology areas. He is also accountable for EH&S performance, budget performance, project development, and personnel leadership of research group from four locations, and he is the leader of the Environmental Technology Leadership Group, which is accountable for environmental technology development for Dow. Previously, Mr. Lord was a technical leader of Propylene Oxide Process Research and was responsible for research program in support of technology development of the propylene oxide process. He was also responsible for development and coordination of research studies at laboratory, pilot plant, and full commercial scale.

WILLIAM J. WARD is currently a retired research engineer. He joined the General Electric Corporate Research and Development Center in 1965, where for 10 years he worked full time in the area of membrane gas separations. In subsequent years he worked part time with GE and other colleagues on membranes. He did pioneering work on facilitated transport in immobilized liquid membranes and on ultrathin polymeric membranes. The latter resulted in a medical oxygen-enrichment appliance. Dr. Ward was a manager from 1976 to 1979, after which he resumed full-time research activities in the area of catalysis. His catalysis work in the 1980s provided new understanding of, and a much-improved catalyst for, the chemical reaction that is at the heart of the silicone polymer industry. From 1990 until 1995, Dr. Ward worked on understanding and improving the performance of polyurethane foam insulation and on solving problems associated with the elimination of chlorofluorocarbons as foam blowing agents. From 1996 through 1998, he was the technical leader of a team that made another major advance in the synthesis of silicone polymers. In his last 3 years at GE, he was involved in a successful effort to develop a manufacturing process to produce a ceramic metal halide lamp. After retiring from GE in 2000, he has consulted for GE and other companies, including those associated with Walter Robb. In 1987, he was elected to the NAE. Dr. Ward has 29 publications in refereed journals and 40 patents.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B; Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Effects of the Deletion of Chemical Agent Washout on Operations at the Blue Grass Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21884.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B; Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Effects of the Deletion of Chemical Agent Washout on Operations at the Blue Grass Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21884.
×
Page 36
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B; Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Effects of the Deletion of Chemical Agent Washout on Operations at the Blue Grass Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21884.
×
Page 37
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B; Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Effects of the Deletion of Chemical Agent Washout on Operations at the Blue Grass Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21884.
×
Page 38
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The United States manufactured significant quantities of chemical weapons during the Cold War and the years prior. Because the chemical weapons are aging, storage constitutes an ongoing risk to the facility workforces and to the communities nearby. In addition, the Chemical Weapons Convention treaty stipulates that the chemical weapons be destroyed. The United States has destroyed approximately 90 percent of the chemical weapons stockpile located at seven sites.

As part of the effort to destroy its remaining stockpile, the Department of Defense is building the Blue Grass Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant (BGCAPP) on the Blue Grass Army Depot (BGAD), near Richmond, Kentucky. The stockpile stored at BGAD consists of rockets and projectiles containing the nerve agents GB and VX and the blister agent mustard. Continued storage poses a risk to the BGAD workforce and the surrounding community because these munitions are several decades old and are developing leaks.

Due to public opposition to the use of incineration to destroy the BGAD stockpile, Congress mandated that non- incineration technologies be identified for use at BGCAPP. As a result, the original BGCAPP design called for munitions to be drained of agent and then for the munition bodies to be washed out using high-pressure hot water. However as part of a larger package of modifications called Engineering Change Proposal 87 (ECP-87), the munition washout step was eliminated. Effects of the Deletion of Chemical Agent Washout on Operations at the Blue Grass Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant examines the impacts of this design change on operations at BGCAPP and makes recommendations to guide future decision making.

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