National Academies Press: OpenBook

Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020 (2016)

Chapter: A List of Individuals, Research Groups, and Organizations That Submitted Comments

« Previous: 6 Range of Operational Models
Suggested Citation:"A List of Individuals, Research Groups, and Organizations That Submitted Comments." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21886.
×

A

List of Individuals, Research Groups, and Organizations That Submitted Comments

Jay Alameda, National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Richard B. Arthur, GE Global Research

Dan Atkins, University of Michigan

Nadine Aubry, Northeastern University

Troy Baer, University of Tennessee

Jim Belak, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Francine Berman, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Prentice Bisbal, Rutgers University

Alan Blatecky, RTI International

Adam Bowser, on behalf of The University Corporation for Advanced Internet Development (Internet2)

Robert F. Brammer, Brammer Technology, LLC

James G. Brasseur, Pennsylvania State University

Danielle Chandler, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, on behalf of the Theoretical and Computational Biophysics Group

Coalition for Academic Scientific Computation, comments collected from senior U.S. cyberinfrastructure facility directors

Coalition for Academic Scientific Computation, comments from members (individual opinions)

Ronald Cohen, Carnegie Institution

Computing Community Consortium, Computing Research Association

George W. Crabtree, Argonne National Laboratory

Alan Crosswalk, Columbia University

Timothy Alden Davis, Texas A&M University

Suggested Citation:"A List of Individuals, Research Groups, and Organizations That Submitted Comments." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21886.
×

Carleton DeTar, University of Utah

Thom Dunning, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and University of Washington

Rodolfo Barniol Duran, Purdue University

Bruce G. Elmegreen, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center

Ian Foster, University of Chicago

Lars Grabow, University of Houston

Victor Hazlewood, University of Tennessee

Hendrik Heinz, University of Akron on behalf of faculty of the College of Polymer Science and Engineering

Tony Hey, University of Washington eScience Institute

Alvin Kennedy, Morgan State University

Rubin H. Landau, Oregon State University

Randall LeVeque, University of Washington

Zachary H. Levine, National Institute of Standards and Technology

David A. Lifka, Cornell University

Yangzheng Lin, Carnegie Institution

Glenn K. Lockwood, 10X Genomics

Paul B. Mackenzie, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, on behalf of the U.S. Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics Collaboration

Jan Mandel, University of Colorado, Denver

Thomas A. Manz, New Mexico State University

J. Andrew McCammon, University of California, San Diego

Jonathan C. McKinney, University of Maryland

Charles Meneveau, Johns Hopkins University

Blake Mertz, West Virginia University

Rajat Mittal, Johns Hopkins University

Colin Morningstar, Carnegie Mellon University

Lawrence Murakami, University of Alaska

Annick Pouquet, University of Colorado, Boulder

Jeff F. Pummel, University of Arkansas

Ralph Roskies, Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center, University of Pittsburgh

Barry I. Schneider, National Institute of Standards and Technology

Bill Schultz, University of Michigan

Jerome Soller, CogniTech Corporation

James M. Stone, Princeton University

Alexander Tchekhovskoy, University of California, Berkeley

Greg van Anders, University of Michigan

Chris Van de Walle, University of California, Santa Barbara

Nancy Wilkins-Diehr, University of California, San Diego

Walt Wright, Check Twelve Leadership

P.K. Yeung, Georgia Institute of Technology

Peijun Zhang, Carnegie Institution

Suggested Citation:"A List of Individuals, Research Groups, and Organizations That Submitted Comments." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21886.
×
Page 127
Suggested Citation:"A List of Individuals, Research Groups, and Organizations That Submitted Comments." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21886.
×
Page 128
Next: B Information-Gathering Meetings »
Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020 Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $48.00 Buy Ebook | $38.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Advanced computing capabilities are used to tackle a rapidly growing range of challenging science and engineering problems, many of which are compute- and data-intensive as well. Demand for advanced computing has been growing for all types and capabilities of systems, from large numbers of single commodity nodes to jobs requiring thousands of cores; for systems with fast interconnects; for systems with excellent data handling and management; and for an increasingly diverse set of applications that includes data analytics as well as modeling and simulation. Since the advent of its supercomputing centers, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has provided its researchers with state-of-the-art computing systems. The growth of new models of computing, including cloud computing and publically available by privately held data repositories, opens up new possibilities for NSF.

In order to better understand the expanding and diverse requirements of the science and engineering community and the importance of a new broader range of advanced computing infrastructure, the NSF requested that the National Research Council carry out a study examining anticipated priorities and associated tradeoffs for advanced computing. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020 provides a framework for future decision-making about NSF’s advanced computing strategy and programs. It offers recommendations aimed at achieving four broad goals: (1) position the U.S. for continued leadership in science and engineering, (2) ensure that resources meet community needs, (3) aid the scientific community in keeping up with the revolution in computing, and (4) sustain the infrastructure for advanced computing.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!