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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
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References

Bradley, E. H., and L. A. Taylor. 2013. The American health care paradox: Why spending more is getting us less. New York: PublicAffairs, a member of The Perseus Books Group.

Eiken, S., K. Sredl, L. Gold, J. Kasten, B. Burwell, and P. Saucier. 2014. Medicaid expenditures for long-term services and supports in FFY 2012. Washington, DC: Truven Health Analytics.

Favreault, M., and J. Dey. 2015. Long-term services and supports for older Americans: Risks and financing research brief. Washington, DC: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Favreault, M. M., H. Gleckman, and R. W. Johnson. 2015. Financing long-term services and supports: Options reflect trade-offs for older Americans and federal spending. Health Affairs 34(12):2181-2191.

Freedman, V. A., and B. C. Spillman. 2014. Disability and care needs among older Americans. The Milbank Quarterly 92(3):509-541.

Frogner, B., and J. Spetz. 2015. Entry and exit of workers in long-term care. San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco, Health Workforce Research Center on Long-Term Care.

IOM (Institute of Medicine). 2008. Retooling for an aging America: Building the health care workforce. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Kaye, S. H. 2015. Overview of the population needing long-term services and supports. Talk presented at Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: A Workshop, Washington, DC. http://www.nationalacademies.org/hmd/~/media/Files/Activity%20Files/Aging/AgingForum/2015%20OCT%2006/Presentations/Kaye%20Presentation.pdf (accessed March 25, 2016).

Marquand, A., and S. A. Chapman. 2014a. Leader states in personal care aide training standards. San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco, Health Workforce Research Center on Long-Term Care.

Marquand, A., and S. A. Chapman. 2014b. The national landscape of personal care aide training standards. San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco, Health Workforce Research Center on Long-Term Care.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
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Montgomery, A. 2015. Culture change in the workforce in an aging America: Are we making any progress? Talk presented at Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: A Workshop, Washington, DC. http://iom.nationalacademies.org/~/media/Files/Activity%20Files/Aging/AgingForum/2015%20OCT%2006/Presentations/Montgomery%20Presentation.pdf (accessed February 22, 2016).

Spetz, J., L. Trupin, T. Bates, and J. M. Coffman. 2015. Future demand for long-term care workers will be influenced by demographic and utilization changes. Health Affairs 34(6):936-945.

WHO (World Health Organization). 2015. World report on ageing and health. Geneva: World Health Organization. http://www.who.int/ageing/publications/world-report-2015/ en (accessed January 5, 2016).

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
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Page 85
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
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Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary Get This Book
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Living independently and participating in one’s community are priorities for many people. In many regions across the United States, there are programs that support and enable people with disabilities and older adults to live where they choose and with whom they choose and to participate fully in their communities. Tremendous progress has been made. However, in many cases, the programs themselves – and access to them – vary not only between states but also within states. Many programs are small, and even when they prove to be successful they are still not scaled up to meet the needs of the many people who would benefit from them. The challenges can include insufficient workforce, insufficient funding, and lack of evidence demonstrating effectiveness or value.

To get a better understanding of the policies needed to maximize independence and support community living and of the research needed to support implementation of those policies, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a public workshop in October 2015. Participants explored policies in place that promote independence and community living for older adults and people with physical disabilities, and identified policies and gaps in policies that can be barriers to independence and the research needed to support changing those policies. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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