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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
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Promising Practices for
Strengthening the
Regional STEM Workforce
Development Ecosystem

Committee on Improving Higher Education’s
Responsiveness to STEM Workforce Needs:
Identifying Analytical Tools and Regional Best Practices


Board on Higher Education and Workforce


Policy and Global Affairs

images

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS

Washington, DC

www.nap.edu

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS    500 Fifth Street, NW    Washington, DC 20001

This activity was supported by Contract No. 2014PG-EDU024 with The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of any organization or agency that provided support for the project.

International Standard Book Number-13: 978-0-309-39111-5
International Standard Book Number-10: 0-309-39111-3
DOI: 10.17226/21894

Additional copies of this report are available for sale from the National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, NW, Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001; (800) 624-6242 or (202) 334-3313; http://www.nap.edu.

Copyright 2016 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

Printed in the United States of America

Suggested citation: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×

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The National Academy of Sciences was established in 1863 by an Act of Congress, signed by President Lincoln, as a private, nongovernmental institution to advise the nation on issues related to science and technology. Members are elected by their peers for outstanding contributions to research. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone is president.

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Learn more about the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine at www.nationalacademies.org.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×

COMMITTEE ON IMPROVING HIGHER EDUCATION’S
RESPONSIVENESS TO STEM WORKFORCE NEEDS: IDENTIFYING
ANALYTICAL TOOLS AND REGIONAL BEST PRACTICES

Cochairs

RICHARD CELESTE, President Emeritus, Colorado College; and Former Governor, State of Ohio

TERESA SULLIVAN, President, University of Virginia

Members

RITA COLWELL (NAS), Distinguished University Professor, University of Maryland, College Park, and The Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

BRIAN FITZGERALD, CEO, Business-Higher Education Forum

ELSA GARMIRE (NAE), Sydney E. Junkins Professor of Engineering, Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College

WILLIAM E. KIRWAN, Chancellor Emeritus, University System of Maryland; and Regents Professor of Mathematics, University of Maryland

SUSAN LAVRAKAS, Consultant on Workforce, Aerospace Industries Association

MARY WRIGHT, Senior Program Director, Demand Side Engagement and Analytics, Jobs for the Future

Staff

ELIZABETH O’HARE, Study Director and Program Officer, Board on Higher Education and Workforce, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

NINA BOSTON, Research Associate, Board on Higher Education and Workforce, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

IRENE NGUN, Research Associate, Board on Higher Education and Workforce, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

THOMAS RUDIN, Director, Board on Higher Education and Workforce, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×

BOARD ON HIGHER EDUCATION AND WORKFORCE

Chair

WILLIAM E. KIRWAN, Chancellor Emeritus, University System of Maryland; and Regents Professor of Mathematics, University of Maryland

Members

F. KING ALEXANDER, President and Chancellor, Louisiana State University

JOHN SEELY BROWN, Visiting Scholar, University of Southern California; former Chief Scientist, Xerox Corporation, and former Director, Xerox Palo Alto Research Center

ANGELA BYARS-WINSTON, Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Wisconsin

JARED COHON (NAE), President Emeritus and University Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University

CARLOS CASTILLO-CHAVEZ, Regents and Joaquin Bustoz Professor of Mathematical Biology, School of Human Evolution and Social Change and the School of Sustainability; and Director, Simon A. Levin Mathematical, Computational and Modeling Sciences Center, Arizona State University

RITA COLWELL (NAS), Distinguished University Professor, University of Maryland, College Park, and The Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

APRILLE ERICSSON, Aerospace Engineer, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

RICHARD FREEMAN, Herbert Ascherman Professor of Economics, Harvard University

EARL LEWIS, President, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

SALLY MASON, President Emerita, University of Iowa

FRANCISCO RODRIGUEZ, Chancellor, Los Angeles Community College District

SUBHASH SINGHAL (NAE), Battelle Fellow Emeritus, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Staff

THOMAS RUDIN, Director

ELIZABETH O’HARE, Program Officer

NINA BOSTON, Research Associate

IRENE NGUN, Research Associate

ADRIANA COUREMBIS, Financial Associate

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×

Preface

This report summarizes an 18-month study by the Committee on Improving Higher Education’s Responsiveness to STEM Workforce Needs: Identifying Analytical Tools and Regional Best Practices, organized under the auspices of the Board on Higher Education and Workforce at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The report’s primary audiences are business and university leaders, key intermediary organizations such as chambers of commerce and regional economic development groups, and state and local government policy makers who seek to create and/or sustain partnerships based on mutual understanding and a shared commitment to regional economic development. We hope the recommendations offered here can serve as a set of promising practices that can enable both sectors to collaborate in sustainable ways that benefit students, universities, companies, regional economies, and national competitiveness.

The committee was composed of a group of experts on subjects related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education, workforce development, university-industry partnerships, and university leadership and administration. The committee’s charge was to explore the effectiveness of selected higher education institutions in educating STEM-trained workers who can meet regional workforce needs. To fulfill this charge, the committee organized five regional workshops around the nation—Phoenix, Arizona; Cleveland, Ohio; Montgomery, Alabama; Los Angeles, California; and Fargo, North Dakota.

In each location, the committee convened leaders and employers from the business community; administrators, faculty, and students from 2-year and 4-year colleges and universities; regional economic development experts; chambers of commerce; state and county policy makers; government officials; and philanthropic foundations. The committee reviewed evidence on effective practices for creating and sustaining university-industry partnerships, including interventions known to improve student retention in STEM majors. The committee also commissioned analyses to look at real-time labor market information in the regions it visited.

In addition to the five regional workshops and commissioned analyses mentioned above, the committee met twice and studied prior efforts addressing STEM workforce development, relevant research findings, and other promising programs and practices not featured in the geographical regions visited by the committee. Beyond the gathering and synthesis of this information, this report reflects the professional and personal judgments and experiences of the committee members.

We are grateful to the staff of the committee: Libby O’Hare, Tom Rudin, Nina Boston, and Irene Ngun with the Board on Higher Education and Workforce. We also acknowledge the invaluable technical assistance of Daniel Bearss from the National Academies’ Research Center.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The committee gratefully acknowledges the support and assistance provided by the organizations and institutions that hosted the series of workshops described in this report. These include Arizona State University, the Ohio Aerospace Institute, Alabama State University, the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce, and North Dakota State University. The committee is grateful to the staff of these organizations who worked tirelessly to plan the workshops. The committee is also indebted to the many participants who attended each workshop—this report is a reflection of their inputs and efforts. We also acknowledge and appreciate the generous support of Lockheed Martin Corporation, which provided a grant to help underwrite the Montgomery, Alabama, workshop.

Page viii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
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The committee thankfully acknowledges the contributions of Karin Matchett and Maria Lund Dahlberg.

The committee gratefully acknowledges the generous sponsorship of this study by The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF REVIEWERS

This report has been reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise, in accordance with procedures approved by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Report Review Committee. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making its published report as sound as possible and to ensure that the report meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the process.

We wish to thank the following individuals for their review of this report: Martin Abraham, Youngstown State University; Oscar Barton, George Mason University; George Boggs, Palomar College; L. Berkley Davis, GE Power and Water; Joseph Francisco, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Valerie Greenhill, EdLeader 21; Edward Hill, Ohio State University; Matthew Hora, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Collins Jones, Montgomery College; Peter Larson, Boeing Defense, Space, & Security; David Longanecker, Western Interstate Commission on Higher Education; Ronald Painter, National Association of Workforce Boards; David Rattray, Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce; Daniel Restuccia, Burning Glass Technologies; and R. Michael Tanner, University of Illinois at Chicago.

Although the reviewers listed above have provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they were not asked to endorse the conclusions or recommendations, nor did they see the final draft of the report before its release. The review of this report was overseen by Cora Marrett, University of Wisconsin and Helen Quinn, Stanford University. Appointed by the Academies, they were responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this report was carried out in accordance with institutional procedures and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final content of this report rests entirely with the authoring committee and the institution.

Richard Celeste, Cochair Teresa Sullivan, Cochair

Committee on Improving Higher Education’s Responsiveness to
STEM Workforce Needs: Identifying Analytical Tools and Regional Best Practices

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×

4-7 Aerospace and Defense Industries: A Sector-Wide Approach to STEM Education and Workforce Development

4-8 Economic Development Strategies at Arizona State University

4-9 Revamped Advisory Boards

4-10 Doosan Bobcat’s Acceleration Center

4-11 Applied Learning Opportunities and Support Services for STEM Students

5-1 Specific Steps for Each Key Actor in Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystems

5-2 Initial Framework for a Self-Assessment Inventory of the Strength of Workforce Partnerships: Institutions of Higher Education

5-3 Initial Framework for a Self-Assessment Inventory of the Strength of Workforce Partnerships: with Local Employers—Businesses, Nonprofits, Government Agencies

FIGURES

3-1 Overview of the need for STEM skills in the Phoenix region

3-2 Overview of the need for STEM skills in the Cleveland region

3-3 Overview of the need for STEM skills in the Montgomery region

3-4 Overview of the STEM workforce landscape in Los Angeles

3-5 Overview of the need for STEM skills in the Fargo region

TABLES

3-1 Demographic Data for the Five Regions Visited

3-2a Phoenix Region: Occupations with a Competitive Advantage in 2013

3-2b Phoenix Region: Top Employers as Identified by RTLMI Analyses

3-2c Phoenix Region: Workshop Participants, January 22–23, 2015

3-3a Cleveland Region: Occupations with a Competitive Advantage in 2013

3-3b Cleveland Region: Top Employers as Identified by RTLMI Analyses

3-3c Cleveland Region: Workshop Participants, April 1, 2015

3-4a Montgomery Region: Occupations with a Competitive Advantage in 2013

3-4b Montgomery Region: Top Employers as Identified by RTLMI Analyses

3-4c Montgomery Region: Workshop Participants, May 11, 2015

3-5 Los Angeles Region Workshop Participants, May 27, 2015

3-6a Fargo Region: Occupations with a Competitive Advantage in 2013

3-6b Fargo Region: Top Employers as Identified by RTLMI Analyses

3-6c Fargo Region: Workshop Participants, June 30, 2015

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
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Page viii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×
Page R8
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×
Page R9
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
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U.S. strength in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines has formed the basis of innovations, technologies, and industries that have spurred the nation’s economic growth throughout the last 150 years. Universities are essential to the creation and transfer of new knowledge that drives innovation. This knowledge moves out of the university and into broader society in several ways – through highly skilled graduates (i.e. human capital); academic publications; and the creation of new products, industries, and companies via the commercialization of scientific breakthroughs. Despite this, our understanding of how universities receive, interpret, and respond to industry signaling demands for STEM-trained workers is far from complete.

Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem reviews the extent to which universities and employers in five metropolitan communities (Phoenix, Arizona; Cleveland, Ohio; Montgomery, Alabama; Los Angeles, California; and Fargo, North Dakota) collaborate successfully to align curricula, labs, and other undergraduate educational experiences with current and prospective regional STEM workforce needs. This report focuses on how to create the kind of university-industry collaboration that promotes higher quality college and university course offerings, lab activities, applied learning experiences, work-based learning programs, and other activities that enable students to acquire knowledge, skills, and attributes they need to be successful in the STEM workforce. The recommendations and findings presented will be most relevant to educators, policy makers, and industry leaders.

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