National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: 2 Project Context and Background
Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×

3

Background on the Selected Regions

INTRODUCTION

In selecting Phoenix, Cleveland, Montgomery, Los Angeles, and Fargo, the committee aimed to capture a broad range of demographic, labor, and educational characteristics. It looked for regions that have a range of types of institutions of higher education (2- and 4-year; public and private); that have active economic development organizations already exploring the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce; and that have economies focused on a variety of industries and employer types. The committee prioritized regions that had a mix of research universities and regional comprehensive universities and also paid particular attention to minority-serving institutions. The committee worked to ensure that historically black colleges and universities, Hispanic-serving institutions, and tribal colleges and universities were included as either hosts or participants at several workshops. Desirable regions were those that have received less attention than locales where linkages between higher education and regional workforce have been extensively examined (e.g., the Boston-Cambridge area of Massachusetts or Silicon Valley in California).

The committee’s primary objectives in its site selection included having a broad geographical distribution with major urban areas as well as smaller cities in more rural regions. The committee identified regions with distinct demographics, experiencing different labor market dynamics and economic growth, and differing in how successful industry and higher education have been thus far in establishing strong cross-sector partnerships. The committee also worked to ensure that selected regions had a mix of small, medium, and large businesses and firms with both regional and national (and in some cases, international) presences. Practical concerns also came into play. For highly productive regional workshops, a project of this magnitude required a strong core set of college, university, industry, and economic development partners in each locale, as well as people ready and willing to assist the committee in organizing and hosting each of the five events (which all occurred within a 6-month period). Lastly, an important criterion was local participants’ eagerness to make progress in their partnerships. Regions were selected in which organizations in both sectors clearly perceived the need for stronger linkages and were moving along the path toward addressing that need.

The data presented below were drawn from a number of sources, including the U.S. Census, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, and real-time labor market information (RTLMI) analyses commissioned by the committee and performed by the nonprofit organization Jobs for the Future. Data for Los Angeles diverge from those of the other regions because of the modified format of that meeting; it was coorganized by the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce, and due to logistical constraints, we were unable to include RTLMI analyses in that workshop. At that meeting the workforce data were provided by a presenter from Beacon Economics. The descriptions below reflect the order in which the committee visited the locations.

Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×

The RTLMI analyses identified the occupations for which each region has a competitive advantage, that is, the occupations that constitute a larger share of the labor market in that region than the average for the United States overall. The areas of competitive advantage may serve as a focal point for higher education, regional employers, and third-party organizations as they consider building or strengthening cross-sector partnerships and developing a regional STEM workforce development ecosystem.

The RTLMI analyses also identified the top industries for STEM-related jobs and the skills most in demand, for both STEM broad and STEM narrow classifications (described in detail in Chapter 2). The analyses showed that every region has many more jobs in STEM broad than in STEM narrow—often by an order of magnitude—demonstrating that higher education’s role in training STEM-competent students who thrive in the regional workforce goes beyond the traditional STEM majors and extends to these institutions’ conferring a range of STEM competencies. This focus on skills is consistent with a theme heard by the committee from employers in the five regions, that is, that STEM skills are often more important than STEM degree fields.

The analyses summarized below capture a moment in time. Clearly, regional needs will change somewhat. The continual evolution of regional economies—and of the macroeconomic environment within which they exist—underscores the need for finer resolution in workforce data and the creation and strengthening of structured partnerships among higher education, government, third-party organizations, and employers in locales nationwide. Table 3-1 presents demographic data for the five regional workshops. Each region is discussed in the order in which the workshops were held.

TABLE 3-1 Demographic Data for the Five Regions Visited

Phoenix AZ Cleveland OH Montgomery AL Los Angeles CA Fargo ND
Percentage of people with a high school education or higher, metropolitan areaa 80.6 77.4 87.5 74.5 94.6
Percentage of people with a high school education or higher, statea 85.7 88.5 83.1 81.2 90.9
Percentage of college degree holders, metropolitan areaa 26.3 14.9 35.7 31.1 39.0
Percentage of college degree holders, statea 26.9 25.2 22.6 30.7 27.2
Median household income, metropolitan areaa $47,139 $26,217 $43,702 $49,497 $45,458
Median household income, statea $49,774 $48,308 $43,253 $61,094 $53,741
Percentage of residents living below the poverty line, metropolitan areaa 22.8 35.4 22.6 22.0 16.3
Percentage of residents living below the poverty line, statea 17.9 15.8 18.6 15.9 11.9
Percent unemployment rate, metropolitan areab 5.7 5.6 6.6 7.5 2.4

aU.S. Census Bureau.

bU.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, http://www.bls.gov/eag, accessed July 2015.

Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×

PHOENIX, ARIZONA

The Phoenix metropolitan area (4.19 million residents in 2010) is rapidly growing and diverse, and located in a state with a significant Native American population and large Hispanic population. Prior to 2007, the region had one of the most rapidly growing economies in the nation, but it was hit hard by the recession beginning in 2008. Major industries include aerospace, defense, information technology, and biomedicine/health care. In addition to these and other large companies, the region has a sizable number of small- and medium-sized businesses, which were well represented at the workshop. Institutions of higher education include Arizona State University (our host), Grand Canyon University, and the Maricopa County Community College District, a network of 10 community colleges in the Phoenix metropolitan area. Figure 3-1 provides an overview of the need for STEM skills in the Phoenix region.

The Phoenix area has a competitive advantage in a number of occupations, with many more falling into the STEM broad category than into STEM narrow. Table 3-2a lists those occupations for which the Phoenix region has a competitive advantage, organized by educational level. Table 3-2b lists Phoenix’s top STEM employers as identified by RTLMI analyses, and Table 3-2c lists the Phoenix workshop participants.

iamge

FIGURE 3-1 Overview of the need for STEM skills in the Phoenix region. Note: The panel in the lower left displays growth or positive change. SOURCE: Jobs for the Future analysis uses Economic Modeling Specialists International data to assess job numbers.

Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×

TABLE 3-2a Phoenix Region: Occupations with a Competitive Advantage in 2013

Educational Level STEM Broad STEM Narrow
Less than a bachelor’s degree Veterinary technologists and technicians
Web developers
Computer user support specialists
Diagnostic medical sonographers
Medical equipment repairers
Heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics and installers
Industrial engineering technicians
Electromechanical technicians
Aerospace engineering and operations technicians
Electrical and electronics engineering technicians
Electrical and electronics drafters
Bachelor’s degree or higher Software and applications developers
Statistical assistants
Computer and information systems managers
Financial managers
Surveyors
Purchasing managers
Anesthesiologists
Forensic science technicians
Hydrologists
Electronics engineers (except computer)
Computer hardware engineers
Operations research analysts
Materials engineer

SOURCE: Analysis by Jobs for the Future using data from Burning Glass Technologies.

TABLE 3-2b Phoenix Region: Top Employers as Identified by RTLMI Analyses

Top STEM Employers—RTLMI Analyses
Dignity Health
Best Buy
Banner Health System
United Health Group
General Motors
eBay
Mayo Foundation
Fresenius
American Express
Intel Corporationa

aAttended the regional workshop.

SOURCE: Analysis by Jobs for the Future.

TABLE 3-2c Phoenix Region: Workshop Participants, January 22–23, 2015

Employers/Industry Higher Education Third-Party Intermediaries Policy/Government Nonprofit/Philanthropic
ACESA
  Corporation
Arizona Public
  Service
TJM Electronics
Freeport
  MacMoRan
Avnet Inc.
Intel Arizona
Google
Medtronic
Microchip
Siemens
Stratco
Arizona State University
Maricopa County
  Community College
  District
Glendale Community
  College
Estrella Mountain
  Community College
Yavapai College
Grand Canyon University
Greater Phoenix
  Economic Council
Greater Yuma Economic
  Development Corporation
Arizona Chamber of
  Commerce and Industry
Arizona Commerce
  Authority
Arizona Technology
  Council
Science Foundation
  Arizona
Arizona Council of
  Engineering and
  Science Associations
Association of
  University
  Research Parks
EdLeader21r
Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×

CLEVELAND, OHIO

The Cleveland metropolitan area has a population of 2.1 million (2010) and is located in northern Ohio on the shore of Lake Erie. Historically, its economy has been strong in manufacturing, and key sectors today include manufacturing, health care, and aerospace. Institutions of higher education include Case Western Reserve University, Youngstown State University, Cuyahoga Community College, and Lorain County Community College. The meeting was hosted by the Ohio Aerospace Institute. Figure 3-2 provides an overview of the need for STEM skills in the Cleveland region.

The Cleveland area has a competitive advantage in a number of occupations, with (as for the other regions visited) many more falling into the STEM broad category than into STEM narrow. Table 3-3a lists those occupations for which the Cleveland region has a competitive advantage, organized by educational level. Table 3-3b lists Cleveland’s top STEM employers as identified by RTLMI analyses, and Table 3-3c lists the Cleveland workshop participants.

iamge

FIGURE 3-2 Overview of the need for STEM skills in the Cleveland region. Note: The panel in the lower left displays growth or positive change. SOURCE: Jobs for the Future analysis uses Economic Modeling Specialists International data to assess job numbers.

Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×

TABLE 3-3a Cleveland Region: Occupations with a Competitive Advantage in 2013

Educational Level STEM Broad STEM Narrow
Less than a bachelor’s degree Foundry mold and core makers
Tool and die makers
Lathe and turning machine tool setters
Operators, credit authorizers
Extruding and drawing machine operators
Prepress technicians and workers
Machinists
Chemical technicians
Industrial engineering technicians
Mechanical drafters
Electromechanical technicians
Aerospace engineering and operations technicians
Mechanical engineering technicians
Bachelor’s degree or higher Pediatricians
Oral and maxillofacial surgeons
Sales engineers
Psychiatrists
Other health care practitioners and technical workers
Other physicians and surgeons
Biomedical engineers
Materials engineers
Actuaries
Nuclear engineers
Industrial engineers
Materials scientists

SOURCE: Analysis by Jobs for the Future using data from Burning Glass Technologies.

TABLE 3-3b Cleveland Region: Top Employers as Identified by RTLMI Analyses

Top STEM Employers—RTLMI Analyses
Ohio Department of Health Southwest General Health Center
Ohio Department of Transportation HCR ManorCare
American Red Cross Philips Electronics
Sherwin Williams Lubrizol Corporationa
Cleveland Clinica Alliance Scientific Solutions
University Hospitals PNC Financial Services
Kindred Healthcare

aAttended the regional workshop.

SOURCE: Analysis by Jobs for the Future.

TABLE 3-3c Cleveland Region: Workshop Participants, April 1, 2015

Employers/Industry Higher Education Third-Party Intermediaries Policy/Government Nonprofit/Philanthropic
The Cleveland Clinic
TimkenSteel
PHASTAR
  Corporation
COO/ZIN
  Technologies
WIRE-Net
University Hospitals
ECCL Aerospace
  Services
Indus International
The Lubrizol
  Corporation
GE Lighting
Cleveland State
  University
Youngstown State
  University
Lorain County
  Community College
Cuyahoga County
  Community College
Case Western Reserve
  University
Baldwin Wallace
  University
Wright State University
University of Cincinnati
Ohio Aerospace
  Institute
New Growth Group
MAGNET
Ohio Manufacturing
  Institute
Cleveland/Cuyahoga
  County Workforce
  Investment Board
Ohio Board of Regents
NASA Glenn Research
>  Center
Ohio Manufacturing
  Institute
KeyBank Foundation
The Nord Family
  Foundation
Cleveland Foundation
Cleveland Engineering
  Society
Dayton Regional STEM
  Center
Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

The Montgomery metropolitan area has 374,000 residents (2010) and is situated in a more rural, southern state. The region has a large African American population, and major industries include defense, aerospace, and the automotive industry. Institutions of higher education include Alabama State University (our host) and Tuskegee University (both historically black universities), Auburn University, and members of the Alabama Community College System. Figure 3-3 provides an overview of the need for STEM skills in the Montgomery region.

The Montgomery area has a competitive advantage in a number of occupations, with many more falling into the STEM broad category than into STEM narrow. Table 3-4a lists those occupations for which the Montgomery region has a competitive advantage, organized by educational level. Table 3-4b lists Montgomery’s top STEM employers as identified by RTLMI analyses, and Table 3-4c lists the Montgomery workshop participants.

iamge

FIGURE 3-3 Overview of the need for STEM skills in the Montgomery region. Note: The panel in the lower left displays growth or positive change. SOURCE: Jobs for the Future analysis uses Economic Modeling Specialists International data to assess job numbers.

Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×

TABLE 3-4a Montgomery Region: Occupations with a Competitive Advantage in 2013

Educational Level STEM Broad STEM Narrow
Less than a bachelor’s degree Power plant operators
Broadcast technicians
Veterinary assistants
Computer, automated teller, and office machine repairers
Welders
Environmental engineering technicians
Environmental science and protection technicians
Surveyors
Mechanical engineering technicians
Bachelor’s degree or higher Database administrators
Forensic science technicians
Other computer occupations
Computer programmers
Instructional coordinators
Budget analysts
Foresters
Urban and regional planners
Environmental engineers
Forensic science technicians
Statisticians
Environmental scientists

SOURCE: Analysis by Jobs for the Future using data from Burning Glass Technologies.

TABLE 3-4b Montgomery Region: Top Employers as Identified by RTLMI Analyses

Top STEM Employers—RTLMI Analyses
Sherlock Smith and Adams Bridgestone/Firestone
City of Montgomery Department of Veterans Affairs
GKN Aerospace IBM
Ricoh Electronics Alcatel-Lucent
Hargrove Engineers + Constructors Rheem Manufacturing
Jackson Hospital American Express
Baptist Medical Center General Dynamics

SOURCE: Analysis by Jobs for the Future.

TABLE 3-4c Montgomery Region: Workshop Participants, May 11, 2015

Employers/Industry Higher Education Third-Party Intermediaries Policy/Government Nonprofit/Philanthropic
Lockheed Martin Conference America Alabama State University
Tuskegee University
Auburn University
Alabama Community College System
H. Councill Trenholm State Community College
Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce
Economic Development Association of Alabama
Alabama Department of Commerce
Alabama Commission on Higher Education
Alabama Science in Motion
Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA

The committee’s Los Angeles meeting took a somewhat different shape, as the opportunity arose to collaborate with the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce in an event already in the planning stages that would reach a substantial number of STEM employers in the region. This meeting thus drew a relatively larger number of representatives of the regional workforce. In addition, the workforce data presented were provided by a local economic research organization, Beacon Economics, rather than by Jobs for the Future, as was done in the other four meetings.

Los Angeles is the second-largest metropolitan area in the United States with a population in 2010 of 12.8 million. It is highly diverse ethnically and socioeconomically, including a large Hispanic population. Whereas other areas of California have historically received more attention from efforts to develop and sustain university-industry partnerships—notably, Silicon Valley and the San Francisco Bay Area—the Los Angeles basin may have less robust partnerships, but at the same time, a broader range of industries with which higher education is or can be connected. The region has a large network of 2- and 4-year institutions of higher education, including the California State Universities at Dominguez Hills, Fullerton, Long Beach, Los Angeles, and Northridge; California State Polytechnic University, Pomona; the University of California, Los Angeles; the University of California, Irvine; the California Institute of Technology; the University of Southern California, the Los Angeles Community College District, Santa Monica Community College, Glendale Community College (among others); and a number of private colleges and universities.

In Los Angeles County, top STEM occupations include health care, professional/business, manufacturing, financial activities, education, government, retail trade, information, transport/utilities, leisure and hospitality, and wholesale trade. Between 2000 and 2013, negative growth was seen in manufacturing and information (Figure 3-4), while considerable growth was seen in health care, professional/business, education, and government. Dramatic growth was seen in the category of leisure and hospitality, which, while small, grew by 125.2 percent over that period (to 6,003 jobs). Health care showed the greatest increase in share of the labor market with 4.3 percent. Figure 3-4 provides an overview of the STEM workforce in Los Angeles, and Table 3-5 lists the Los Angles workshop participants.

iamge

FIGURE 3-4 Overview of the STEM workforce landscape in Los Angeles. Note: Workforce and occupation data for the Los Angeles workshop was analyzed and presented by the consulting firm Beacon Economics and not Jobs for the Future as in the other regions. SOURCES: Adapted from Beacon Economics; U.S. Census 2000; U.S. Census ACS 2013.

Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×

TABLE 3-5 Los Angeles Region Workshop Participants, May 27, 2015

Employers/Industry Higher Education Third-Party Intermediaries Policy/Government Nonprofit/Philanthropic
AAA T.L.C. Health Care Inc.
AECOM
AltaSea, Port of Los Angeles
AP Group
Avery James Inc.
Beacon Management Group
Cedars-Sinai Health System
City of Los Angeles
Cumming Construction Management Inc.
Deloitte LLP
Farmers Insurance Group of Companies
Hitachi Ltd. Los Angeles Office
HMC Architects
JPMorgan Chase Bank
Los Angeles Unified School District
Northrup Grumman Corporation
Pearson Education
Port of Los Angeles
Raytheon
Roll Global
Sims Recycling Solutions
Texas Instruments
California State University, Los Angeles
California State University, Dominguez Hills
California State University, Northridge
California Institute of Technology
Citrus College
DeVry University
East Los Angeles College
El Camino College
Los Angeles Community
College District
Los Angeles Harbor College
Los Angeles Southwest Community
College
Loyola Marymount University
Mt. San Antonio College
Pasadena City College
University of California, Los Angeles
University of Southern California
Woodbury University
Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce
Bixel Exchange
Los Angeles County Economic
Development Corporation
Managed Career Solutions
San Gabriel Valley Economic
Partnership
South Bay Workforce
Investment Board
Los Angeles County Metropolitan
Transportation Authority
Los Angeles County Office of Education
Los Angeles County Workforce
Investment Board
Los Angeles Jobs Corps Center
(U.S. Department of Labor)
Nonprofit/Philanthropic
American Cancer Society
Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Los
Angeles
Boy Scouts of America
California Community Foundation
College-Bridge
Common Sense Education
EnCorps STEM Teachers
Friends of Hollywood Central Park
Great Minds in STEM
I Have A Dream
Mentors International
Society of Hispanic Professional
Engineers
Specialty Family Foundation
Teach for America
The Carol and James Collins
Foundation
The Durfee Foundation
Tiger Woods Foundation
William C. Bannerman Foundation
YMCA of Metropolitan Los Angeles
Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×

FARGO, NORTH DAKOTA

Fargo is a city of 209,000 inhabitants (2010) located in eastern North Dakota. For the past 5 years it has experienced an economic boom as a result of a surge of oil and gas production in the western part of the state. The state is rural and has a significant Native American population. Major industries include oil and gas extraction, agriculture, transportation, and equipment manufacturing. Institutions of higher education in the region include North Dakota State University (our host), North Dakota State College of Science, University of North Dakota, and Valley City State University; the meeting also had representation from the North Dakota Association of Tribal Colleges. Figure 3-5 provides an overview of the need for STEM skills in the Fargo region.

The Fargo area has a competitive advantage in a number of occupations, and the STEM broad category includes significantly more job types than does STEM narrow. Table 3-6a lists those occupations for which the Fargo region has a competitive advantage, organized by educational level. Table 3-6b lists Fargo’s top STEM employers as identified by RTLMI analyses, and Table 3-6c lists the Fargo workshop participants.

iamge

FIGURE 3-5 Overview of the need for STEM skills in the Fargo region. Note: The panel in the lower left displays job growth or positive change. SOURCE: Jobs for the Future analysis uses Economic Modeling Specialists International data to assess job numbers.

Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×

TABLE 3-6a Fargo Region: Occupations with a Competitive Advantage in 2013

Educational Level STEM Broad STEM Narrow
Less than a bachelor’s degree Precision instrument repairers
Cement masons and concrete finishers
Installers and repairers of electronic home entertainment equipment
Structural iron and steel workers
Mobile heavy equipment mechanics
Mechanical drafters
Agricultural and food science technicians
Civil engineering technicians
Mechanical drafters
Mechanical engineering technicians
Industrial engineering technicians
Bachelor’s degree or higher Surgeons
Optometrists
Occupational therapists
Chiropractors
Financial specialists
Secondary school career/technical education teachers
Soil and plant scientists
Food scientists and technologists
Life scientists
Biological scientists
Foresters
Atmospheric and space scientists

SOURCE: Analysis by Jobs for the Future using data from Burning Glass Technologies.

TABLE 3-6b Fargo Region: Top Employers as Identified by RTLMI Analyses

Top STEM Employers—RTLMI Analyses
North Dakota State Universitya Department of Veterans Affairs
KJL Engineeringa RDO Equipmenta
Kar Auction Services Deere and Company
Automotive Finance Corporation Appareoa
Ulteig Engineers Doosan Bobcat Companya
Essentia Health Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Dakota
Sanford Health

aAttended the regional workshop.

SOURCE: Analysis by Jobs for the Future.

TABLE 3-6c Fargo Region: Workshop Participants, June 30, 2015

Employers/Industry Higher Education Third-Party Intermediaries Policy/Government Nonprofit/Philanthropic
Microsoft Fargo
Doosan Bobcat Company
Trail King Industries
Sanford Health
Appareo
Minn-Dak Farmers Cooperative
Tecton Products LLC
Caterpillar Reman
KJL Engineering
General Equipment and Supplies
F-M Ambulance Service
Marvin Windows and Doors—Integrity and Tecton Products
Partner
RDO Equipment Company
Laney’s Inc.
North Dakota State University
North Dakota State College of Science
University of North Dakota
Valley City State University
North Dakota Association of Tribal Colleges
Bismarck State College
Lake Region State College
Mayville State University
Greater Fargo Moorhead
Economic Development
Corporation
North Dakota STEM
Network
Jamestown/Stutsman
Development Corporation
North Dakota Department of Commerce
Job Service North Dakota
North Dakota Department of Career and Technical Education
Gateway to Science
Emerging Prairie – Speaker’s Bureau
Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×
Page 23
Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×
Page 24
Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×
Page 25
Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×
Page 26
Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×
Page 27
Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×
Page 28
Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×
Page 29
Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×
Page 30
Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×
Page 31
Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×
Page 32
Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×
Page 33
Suggested Citation:"3 Background on the Selected Regions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21894.
×
Page 34
Next: 4 Lessons Learned and Analysis »
Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $49.00 Buy Ebook | $39.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

U.S. strength in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines has formed the basis of innovations, technologies, and industries that have spurred the nation’s economic growth throughout the last 150 years. Universities are essential to the creation and transfer of new knowledge that drives innovation. This knowledge moves out of the university and into broader society in several ways – through highly skilled graduates (i.e. human capital); academic publications; and the creation of new products, industries, and companies via the commercialization of scientific breakthroughs. Despite this, our understanding of how universities receive, interpret, and respond to industry signaling demands for STEM-trained workers is far from complete.

Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem reviews the extent to which universities and employers in five metropolitan communities (Phoenix, Arizona; Cleveland, Ohio; Montgomery, Alabama; Los Angeles, California; and Fargo, North Dakota) collaborate successfully to align curricula, labs, and other undergraduate educational experiences with current and prospective regional STEM workforce needs. This report focuses on how to create the kind of university-industry collaboration that promotes higher quality college and university course offerings, lab activities, applied learning experiences, work-based learning programs, and other activities that enable students to acquire knowledge, skills, and attributes they need to be successful in the STEM workforce. The recommendations and findings presented will be most relevant to educators, policy makers, and industry leaders.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!