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Fostering Integrity in Research (2017)

Chapter: Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Fostering Integrity in Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21896.
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Appendix A

Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff

CHAIR

Robert M. Nerem, Institute Professor and Parker H. Petit Professor Emeritus, Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology

Dr. Nerem joined Georgia Tech in 1987 as the Parker H. Petit Distinguished Chair for Engineering in Medicine. He is an Institute Professor Emeritus, and he was the founding Director of the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, a research institute established in 1995 to bring biochemistry, bioengineering, and biology faculty together so as to create a “convergent,” interdisciplinary culture. He also was the Director of the Georgia Tech/Emory Center for the Engineering of Living Tissues, a National Science Foundation-funded Engineering Research Center, from 1998 to 2009. Dr. Nerem received his Ph.D. in 1964 from Ohio State University and is the author of more than 200 publications. Over the years he has served the community in a variety of ways. This includes his extensive involvement with the International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering (IFMBE), serving as President from 1988 to 1991 and being the Founding President of the International Academy for Medical and Biological Engineering from 1997 to 2000. He also was the President of the International Union for Physical and Engineering Sciences in Medicine from 1991 to 1994. Dr. Nerem was the Founding President and is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE). He has served on the advisory boards of a number of companies including startups, and from 2000 to 2003 he was a member of the Food and Drug Administration Science Board. From 2003 to 2006 he was a part-time Senior Advisor for Bioengineering in the National Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering at the National Institutes of Health. In 1988 Dr. Nerem was elected to the National Academy of Engineering

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Fostering Integrity in Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21896.
×

(NAE) and in 1992 to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, what is now named the National Academy of Medicine. In 1994 he was elected a Foreign Member of the Polish Academy of Sciences, in 1998 a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and in 2006 a Foreign Member of the Swedish Royal Academy of Engineering Sciences. In 2008 Dr. Nerem was selected by NAE for the Founders Award, and in 2011 he was made an IFMBE Honorary Life Member. In 2015 IFMBE selected Dr. Nerem for the inaugural John A. Hopps Award.

MEMBERS

Ann M. Arvin, Lucile Packard Professor of Pediatrics and Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine; and Vice Provost and Dean of Research, Stanford University

Ann Arvin, M.D., is the Lucile Salter Packard Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, and the Vice Provost and Dean of Research, Stanford University. As Vice Provost, she oversees Stanford’s 18 interdisciplinary institutes as well as university research policies, compliance with regulations concerning the responsible conduct of research and human and animal research, and the Office of Technology Licensing. Her laboratory research focuses on molecular mechanisms of varicella zoster virus infection and immune responses to this common human herpesvirus. Her clinical research seeks to improve the understanding of the developing immune system in infants and young children in the context of viral infections and vaccines. Her work has been recognized by election to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Association of American Physicians, and the American Pediatric Society. Her past and current national committee service includes the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Countil (NAS/NRC) Board on Life Sciences, the Director’s Advisory Council of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and NAS/NRC Committees including the Committee on Federal Research Regulations and Reporting Requirements, the Committee on Policy and Global Affairs, and the Committee on Science, Technology and Law. Dr. Arvin was chief of the Infectious Diseases Division of the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford from 1984 to 2006. She received her A.B. from Brown University, M.A. in philosophy from Brandeis University, and M.D. degree from the University of Pennsylvania. She completed her residency in pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco, and subspecialty training in infectious diseases at UCSF and Stanford University.

Rebecca M. Bergman, President, Gustavus Adolphus College

Ms. Rebecca M. Bergman serves as the President of Gustavus Adolphus College, a liberal arts college located in St. Peter, MN. Ms. Bergman served as Vice

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Fostering Integrity in Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21896.
×

President, Research and Technology for Cardiac Rhythm Disease Management (CRDM) of Medtronic, Inc. from 2012 to 2014. Ms. Bergman served as a Vice President of New Therapies & Diagnostics, Cardiac Rhythm Disease Management at Medtronic, Inc., from January 2009 until 2012. Ms. Bergman served as a Vice President for Science & Technology of Medtronic, Inc., from 2002 until January 2009. Ms. Bergman has more than 26 years of experience in the medical technology industry including over 18 years of experience in research and technology management and product development. She has been an Independent Director of Sigma-Aldrich Corporation since May 2008. She serves as a Director of Sigma-Aldrich Company Limited. She served as a Director of TEI Biosciences Inc. Ms. Bergman has served as a member of the National Advisory Council of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the National Institutes of Health and serves on a number of academic advisory boards. Ms. Bergman is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. She has a B.S. in chemical engineering from Princeton University and an honorary Ph.D. in engineering from Drexel University. She has also completed graduate studies in chemical engineering and material science at the University of Minnesota.

Moses Chan, Evan Pugh Professor of Physics, Pennsylvania State University

Moses Chan is Evan Pugh Professor of Physics at Pennsylvania State University. He is an alumnus of Bridgewater College and Cornell University, where he earned his Ph.D. in 1974 and was a Postdoctoral Associate at Duke University. He has been a professor at Penn State’s University Park Campus since 1979. Through the years, Professor Chan’s work has spanned many diverse topics. For his numerous contributions to low-temperature physics, in 1996 he shared the prestigious Fritz London Memorial prize with Carl Wieman and Eric A. Cornell. He was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 2000, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 2004.

C. K. Gunsalus, Director, National Center for Professional and Research Ethics, University of Illinois

C. K. Gunsalus is the Director of the National Center for Professional and Research Ethics, Professor Emerita of Business, and Research Professor at the Coordinated Science Laboratory. She has been on the faculty of the Colleges of Business, Law, and Medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and served a range of administrative roles in the campus administration as well as Special Counsel in the Office of University Counsel. She was the Principal Investigator on the National Science Foundation–funded cooperative agreement that provided $1.5M to initiate Ethics CORE, the National Online Ethics Resource Center, and a recent $2.7M award focusing on the leadership needs of the research university of the future. Her work focuses on topics such as leadership development, ethics, research integrity, whistleblowing, and professionalism.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Fostering Integrity in Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21896.
×

She was a member of the U.S. Commission on Research Integrity and served for 4 years as chair of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Committee on Scientific Freedom and Responsibility. She is an elected Fellow of the AAAS. She is the author of two books published by the Harvard University Press and a range of publications on institutional and research integrity.

Deborah G. Johnson, Anne Shirley Carter Olsson Professor of Applied Ethics Emeritus, University of Virginia

Deborah G. Johnson is the Anne Shirley Carter Olsson Professor of Applied Ethics Emeritus in the Science, Technology, and Society Program in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at the University of Virginia. Best known for her work on computer ethics and engineering ethics, Johnson’s research examines the ethical, social, and policy implications of technology and engineering, especially information technology. Johnson is the author/editor of nine books including four editions of Computer Ethics (1985, 1991, 2001, 2009) and her most recent book, Technology & Society: Engineering Our Sociotechnical Future with J. M. Wetmore (2009). She has published over 100 papers in a variety of journals and edited volumes. Her research has repeatedly received support from the National Science Foundation. Most recently she received funding for a project on Surveillance and Transparency as Sociotechnical Systems of Accountability (2010-2012) and another project on Ethics for Developing Technologies: An Analysis of Artificial Agents (2011-2013). During 1992-1993 she was a Visiting Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering and Operations Research of Princeton University where she worked on a National Science Foundation project on ethics and computer decision models. In 1994 and 1995 and again in 2000, she received National Science Foundation funding to conduct workshops to prepare undergraduate faculty to teach courses and course modules on ethical and professional issues in computing. Active in professional organizations, Johnson has served as President of the Society for Philosophy and Technology, President of the International Society for Ethics and Information Technology, Treasurer of the ACM Special Interest Group on Computers and Society, Chair of the American Philosophical Association Committee on Computers and Philosophy, and a member of the Executive Board of the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics. She has also served on several committees of the National Academies.

Michael A. Keller, Ida M. Green University Librarian and Director, Academic Information Resources, Stanford University

At Stanford, Michael A. Keller is the Ida M. Green University Librarian, Director of Academic Information Resources, Publisher of HighWire Press, and Publisher of the Stanford University Press. These titles touch on his major professional preoccupations: commitment to support of research, teaching, and learning; effective deployment of information technology hand-in-hand with materials; and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Fostering Integrity in Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21896.
×

active involvement in the evolution and growth of scholarly communication. He may be best known at present for his distinctively entrepreneurial style of librarianship. As University Librarian, he endeavors to champion deep collecting of traditional library materials (especially of manuscript and archival materials) concurrent with full engagement in emerging information technologies. Uniquely, Keller’s responsibilities at Stanford encompass libraries, cybraries, academic and residential computing, and publishing and publishing services. As a result of his work in collection development at Cornell, Berkeley, Yale, and Stanford—which provided broad exposure to the global publication and bookselling trades—Keller became convinced of a need for correction in the marketplace of scholarly communications, especially journal publishing. Long involved in the great debate on serials pricing, especially in the arenas of science, technology, and medicine, he has served as advisor, consultant, and committee member to the American Association for the Advancement of Science and other scholarly societies. Thus in 1995, in response to scholars’ requests for assistance to their scholarly societies, he established the HighWire Press as an enterprise within the Stanford University Libraries to provide online co-publishing services initially to three scholarly journals. As of January 2009, HighWire Press has grown to support over 1,200 high-impact STM journals among more than 130 major scholarly societies, over 1.8 million articles of which are available free online. Keller was educated at Hamilton College (B.A. biology, music 1967), SUNY Buffalo (M.A., musicology, 1970), and SUNY Geneseo (M.L.S., 1971). From 1973 to 1981, he served as Music Librarian and Senior Lecturer in Musicology at Cornell University and then in a similar capacity at UC Berkeley. While at Berkeley, he also taught musicology at Stanford University and began the complete revision of the definitive Music Research and Reference Materials, an annotated bibliography popularly known as Duckles in honor of its original compiler. Yale called him to the post of Associate University Librarian and Director of Collection Development in 1986. In 1993, he joined the Stanford staff as the Ida M. Green Director of Libraries. In 1994, he was named to his current position of University Librarian and Director of Academic Information Resources. In 1995, by establishing HighWire Press, he became its publisher, and in April 2000, he was assigned similar strategic duty for the Stanford University Press. In 2010, Keller became an elected Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences.

W. Carl Lineberger, E. U. Condon Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Fellow of JILA, University of Colorado

Carl Lineberger serves as E. U. Condon Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Colorado Boulder. Dr. Lineberger was nominated by President Obama and confirmed by the U.S. Senate to be a Member of the National Science Board for the 2011-2016 term. In 2016, President Obama appointed him to serve a second 6-year term on NSB. Dr. Lineberger has chaired the National Science Foundation Advisory Committees on Mathematical and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Fostering Integrity in Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21896.
×

Physical Sciences and on the Science and Technology Centers. He has completed service on the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy; the NRC Governing Board; and the Department of Energy Committee on New Science for a Secure and Sustainable Energy Future. His work is primarily experimental, using a wide variety of laser-based techniques to study structure and reactivity of gas-phase ions. He has published 2,850 papers in major scientific journals, and his graduate students and postdoctoral associates hold major research-related positions throughout the world. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Brian C. Martinson, Senior Research Investigator, HealthPartners Institute, Core Investigator, Minneapolis VA, Center for Chronic Disease Outcomes Research, and Associate Professor, University of Minnesota, Department of Medicine

Brian C. Martinson is a senior research investigator at HealthPartners Institute, Core Investigator, Minneapolis VA, Center for Chronic Disease Outcomes Research, and Associate Professor, University of Minnesota, Department of Medicine. He earned his Ph.D. in sociology and demography at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, and his postdoctoral training was in cardiovascular behavioral health at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Over the past 15 years, Dr. Martinson has contributed both substantively and methodologically to improving the understanding of research-related behavior (both that which contributes to research integrity and that which can undermine it), as well as to understanding the determinants of such behavior. He has led or co-led four federally funded research projects on these topics. His work was the first to document surprisingly high levels of self-reported, undesirable research-related behavior in large samples of NIH-funded researchers (see, e.g. Martinson et al., 2005, Nature, “Scientists behaving badly”). This line of research was also among the first to document the potential influences of perceptions of organizational justice on research-related behaviors among academic researchers. As Co-Principal Investigator with Dr. Carol Thrush, he co-led the development of and assessment of the validity and reliability of a survey instrument to assess the integrity of organizational climates in research organizations, resulting in a tool called the Survey of Organizational Research Climate (SOURCE). Most recently, he served as PI of a two year project in the VA conducting a randomized controlled trial using the SOURCE tool as part of a project testing the efficacy of a reporting and feedback intervention to improve research integrity climates in VA research settings. In 2009–2010, Dr. Martinson served as a consultant to a three-university consortium participating in the U.S. Council of Graduate Schools’ Project on Scholarly Integrity. During that same time frame, he served on an invited expert panel on research integrity, convened by the Council of Canadian Academies at the request of Industry Canada, leading to the report Honesty, Accountability

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Fostering Integrity in Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21896.
×

and Trust: Fostering Research Integrity in Canada. In 2014, he served on the planning committee and subsequently as a speaker at a workshop of the Roundtable on Science and Welfare in Laboratory Animal Use (An ILAR Roundtable Series)—“The Missing “R”: Reproducibility in a Changing Research Landscape, National Academy of Sciences, Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. Washington, DC, June 4-5. In 2015, he was an invited participant (one of 20) in a 2-day colloquium, sponsored by the American Academy of Microbiology, focused on issues of reproducibility of research in that field, entitled “Promoting Ethical Practices in the Scientific Enterprise,” Washington, DC, October 14-15.

Victoria Stodden, Associate Professor of Information Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Victoria Stodden joined the School of Information Sciences as an associate professor in Fall 2014. She is a leading figure in the area of reproducibility in computational science, exploring how we can better ensure the reliability and usefulness of scientific results in the face of increasingly sophisticated computational approaches to research. Her work addresses a wide range of topics, including standards of openness for data and code sharing, legal and policy barriers to disseminating reproducible research, robustness in replicated findings, cyberinfrastructure to enable reproducibility, and scientific publishing practices. Dr. Stodden co-chairs the National Science Foundation Advisory Committee for CyberInfrastructure and is a member of the NSF Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering Advisory Committee. She also serves on the National Academies Committee on Responsible Science: Ensuring the Integrity of the Research Process; and the Data Science Post-Secondary Education Roundtable. Previously an assistant professor of statistics at Columbia University, Dr. Stodden taught courses in data science, reproducible research, and statistical theory and was affiliated with the Institute for Data Sciences and Engineering. She co-edited two books released in 2014—Privacy, Big Data, and the Public Good: Frameworks for Engagement, published by Cambridge University Press, and Implementing Reproducible Research, published by Taylor & Francis. Dr. Stodden earned her Ph.D. in statistics and her law degree from Stanford University. She also holds a master’s degree in economics from the University of British Columbia and a bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Ottawa.

Sara Wilson, Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering, University of Kansas

Sara Wilson joined the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Kansas in 2001. In addition to her position as an associate professor in mechanical engineering, she is the academic director of the Bioengineering Graduate Program at the University of Kansas and has a courtesy appointment in physical therapy and rehabilitation sciences at the University of Kansas Medical Center. Prior to joining University of Kansas, she was a postdoctoral researcher at the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Fostering Integrity in Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21896.
×

University of Virginia. Dr. Wilson conducts research in the neuromuscular control of human motion using engineering principles from control theory and dynamics. She has studied the effects of occupational exposures such as vibration on the lumbar spine and low back disorders. She is also involved in the development of medical devices used in physical therapy, obstetrics, and internal medicine. She is deputy editor of the Journal of Applied Biomechanics. She was the 2015–2016 chair of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Bioengineering Division. She is also active in teaching and development of educational tools in the area of responsible conduct of research for graduate students in engineering. She was a 2006 W. T. Kemper Fellow for Teaching Excellence at the University of Kansas. Dr. Wilson received her Ph.D. in medical engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1999, her master’s degree in mechanical engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1994, and a bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1992.

Paul Root Wolpe, Asa Griggs Candler Professor of Bioethics; Director, Center for Ethics, Emory University

Paul Root Wolpe, Ph.D., is the Asa Griggs Candler Professor of Bioethics, the Raymond F. Schinazi Distinguished Research Chair in Jewish Bioethics, a Professor in the Departments of Medicine, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, and Sociology, and the Director of the Center for Ethics at Emory University. Dr. Wolpe also serves as the first Senior Bioethicist for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), where he is responsible for formulating policy on bioethical issues and safeguarding research subjects. He is Co-editor of the American Journal of Bioethics (AJOB), the premier scholarly journal in bioethics, and Editor of AJOB Neuroscience, and sits on the editorial boards of over a dozen professional journals in medicine and ethics. Dr Wolpe is a Past President of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities; a Fellow of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, the country’s oldest medical society; a Fellow of the Hastings Center, the oldest bioethics institute in America; and was the first National Bioethics Advisor to Planned Parenthood Federation of America. Dr. Wolpe moved to Emory University in the summer of 2008 from the University of Pennsylvania, where he was on the faculty for over 20 years in the Departments of Psychiatry, Sociology, and Medical Ethics. He was a Senior Fellow of Penn’s Center for Bioethics, and directed the Scattergood Program for the Applied Ethics of Behavioral Health and the Program in Psychiatry and Ethics at the School of Medicine. Dr. Wolpe is the author of over 125 articles, editorials, and book chapters in sociology, medicine, and bioethics, and has contributed to a variety of encyclopedias on bioethical issues. A futurist interested in social dynamics, Dr. Wolpe’s work focuses on the social, religious, ethical, and ideological impact of technology on the human condition. Considered one of the founders of the field of neuroethics, which examines the ethical implications of neuroscience, he also writes about other emerging technologies, such as genetic engineering, nanotechnology, prosthetics,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Fostering Integrity in Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21896.
×

and new reproductive technologies. His teaching and publications range across multiple fields of bioethics and sociology, including death and dying, genetics and eugenics, sexuality and gender, mental health and illness, alternative medicine, and bioethics in extreme environments such as space.

Levi Wood, Assistant Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology

Dr. Wood joined Georgia Tech as an assistant professor in August 2015. Prior to his current appointment, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School. There he used systems biology to elucidate novel signaling mechanisms in Alzheimer’s disease and intestinal inflammation. Dr. Wood received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he developed and used a microfluidic platform to identify dominant mechanisms governing vascular geometry during early vascular growth.

STAFF

Tom Arrison is a program director in the Policy and Global Affairs division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. He joined the Academies in 1990 and has directed a range of studies and other projects in areas such as international science and technology relations, innovation, information technology, higher education, and strengthening the U.S. research enterprise. Arrison is also the executive director of the InterAcademy Council/InterAcademy Partnership for Research. IAC produces reports on scientific, technological, and health issues related to the great global challenges of our time, providing knowledge and advice to national governments and international organizations. He earned M.A. degrees in public policy and Asian studies from the University of Michigan.

Nina Ward is a research associate in the Policy and Global Affairs (PGA) division at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Ward supports PGA research efforts for Development, Security, and Cooperation (DSC) and the InterAcademy Partnership for Research. She has also formerly supported the Board on Higher Education and Workforce and the Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine. She earned a B.A. in anthropology at Elon University and is currently pursuing an M.P.P. at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy.

Dr. Lida Anestidou is senior program officer at the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, where she directs a diverse portfolio of studies on the use of laboratory animals; biodefense and bio-security; and research integrity/responsible conduct of research. Prior to this position she was faculty at the Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society, Vanderbilt

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Fostering Integrity in Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21896.
×

University Medical Center. She earned her doctorate in biomedical sciences from the University of Texas at Houston. Working with physiologist Norman Weisbrodt, she explored the effects of nitric oxide on the motility of the gastrointestinal musculature. Working with research integrity expert and biomedical ethics educator Elizabeth Heitman, she concurrently pursued her interests in biomedical ethics, scientific integrity, and science policy. Dr. Anestidou also holds a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from Greece (her home country) and an M.S. in Veterinary Sciences from the University of Florida. She is an editorial board member of Science and Engineering Ethics, Lab Animal, and SciTech Lawyer and an ad hoc reviewer for the American Journal of Bioethics. She is a member of the National Conference of Lawyers and Scientists. Dr. Anestidou serves as an expert reviewer in the Ethics Evaluation of grant applications to the 7th Framework Program of the European Research Council and the European Commission Directorate General Research.

Neeraj Prasad Gorkhaly is an associate program officer at the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine. Currently he works on the Board of Physics and Astronomy, and the National Materials and Manufacturing Board. Previously, he served in various capacities for the National Academies’ Committee on Science, Engineering and Public Policy as well as the Board on Global Science and Technology. In the past decade he has participated in over 60 studies, reports, and workshops providing advice to the U.S. government on various scientific issues and policies, including the Norman Augustine–chaired report Rising Above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter Economic Future. He is also the president and founder of the Gorkhaly Foundation, a volunteer nonprofit organization based in Virginia, implementing social and economically sustainable projects in rural areas of Nepal. He is a graduate of the Ohio State University and a past fellow of the John Glenn Institute for Public Service and Public Policy.

Maria Lund Dahlberg is an associate program officer with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She works with a number of groups across the institution, including the Board on Higher Education and Workforce, the central Office of Communications, and the National Academy of Medicine. She came to the National Academies by way of a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellowship, which she received after completing all requirements short of finalizing the dissertation for her doctorate in physics at the Pennsylvania State University. Ms. Dahlberg holds a B.A. in physics from Vassar College and an M.S. in physics from the Pennsylvania State University.

Steve Olson has been a consultant writer since 1979 for the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, the Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Fostering Integrity in Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21896.
×

Technology, the Office of Science and Technology Policy, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and other organizations. He is the author of Mapping Human History: Genes, Race, and Our Common Origins, which was one of five finalists for the 2002 nonfiction National Book Award; Count Down: Six Kids Vie for Glory at the World’s Toughest Math Competition; and Eruption: The Untold Story of Mount St. Helens, which was shortlisted for the Boardman Tasker Prize for Mountain Literature. He also has written for the Atlantic Monthly, Science, the Smithsonian, Scientific American, Wired, the Yale Alumni Magazine, the Washingtonian, Slate, Astronomy, Science 82-86, and many other magazines. From 1989 through 1992 he served as Special Assistant for Communications in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. He earned a bachelor’s degree in physics from Yale University in 1978.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Fostering Integrity in Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21896.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Fostering Integrity in Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21896.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Fostering Integrity in Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21896.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Fostering Integrity in Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21896.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Fostering Integrity in Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21896.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Fostering Integrity in Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21896.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Fostering Integrity in Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21896.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Fostering Integrity in Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21896.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Fostering Integrity in Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21896.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Fostering Integrity in Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21896.
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The integrity of knowledge that emerges from research is based on individual and collective adherence to core values of objectivity, honesty, openness, fairness, accountability, and stewardship. Integrity in science means that the organizations in which research is conducted encourage those involved to exemplify these values in every step of the research process. Understanding the dynamics that support – or distort – practices that uphold the integrity of research by all participants ensures that the research enterprise advances knowledge.

The 1992 report Responsible Science: Ensuring the Integrity of the Research Process evaluated issues related to scientific responsibility and the conduct of research. It provided a valuable service in describing and analyzing a very complicated set of issues, and has served as a crucial basis for thinking about research integrity for more than two decades. However, as experience has accumulated with various forms of research misconduct, detrimental research practices, and other forms of misconduct, as subsequent empirical research has revealed more about the nature of scientific misconduct, and because technological and social changes have altered the environment in which science is conducted, it is clear that the framework established more than two decades ago needs to be updated.

Responsible Science served as a valuable benchmark to set the context for this most recent analysis and to help guide the committee’s thought process. Fostering Integrity in Research identifies best practices in research and recommends practical options for discouraging and addressing research misconduct and detrimental research practices.

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