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Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary (2016)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
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Appendix B

Biographical Sketches of
Workshop Speakers and
Planning Committee Members
1

Rodney Adkins retired as senior vice president of Corporate Strategy from IBM at the end of 2014 after more than 33 years of service for the company. In this role he was responsible for leading continuous transformation across IBM and developing strategies that are linked to execution plans for a new era of computing, new markets, and new clients. Adkins was previously senior vice president of the systems and technology group, a position he held since 2009. In this role he was responsible for all aspects of IBM’s semiconductor, server, storage, and system software businesses, as well as the company’s integrated supply chain and global business partners organizations. Before heading the systems and technology group (STG) he was senior vice president of STG development and manufacturing, a position he held since 2007. Adkins has held a number of development and management roles in his IBM career, including general manager positions for the PC Company, UNIX Systems, and Pervasive Computing. Inducted into the National Academy of Engineering in 2005, Adkins is also a member of the Executive Leadership Council, and the National Society of Black Engineers, which in 2001 awarded him the Golden Torch Award for Lifetime Achievement in Industry. In 2011, Black Enterprise magazine chose Adkins as its Corporate Executive of the Year, and in 2002, Fortune magazine named Adkins one of the 50 Most Powerful Black Executives in America. He serves on the board of directors for United Parcel Service (UPS), the national board of the Smithsonian Institution, and the board of directors for the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering.

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1 Names appear in alphabetical order.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
×

Adkins also serves on the Georgia Tech Foundation, Rollins College Board of Trustees, University of Maryland Baltimore County Board of Visitors, and the University of Miami College of Engineering Visiting Committee. Adkins holds a bachelor of arts degree with an emphasis in physics from Rollins College, bachelor of science and master of science degrees in electrical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology, and honorary doctor degrees from both the Georgia Institute of Technology and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Daniel E. Atkins is a professor in the school of information and in the department of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Michigan (UM), Ann Arbor. He holds a Ph.D. in computer science and M.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois, and a B.S.E.E. from Bucknell University. He began his research and teaching career in the area of high-performance computer architecture, and led or participated in the design and construction of seven experimental machines. He developed high-speed arithmetic algorithms now widely used in modern computers. He did pioneering work in application-specific computer architecture, including interdisciplinary collaboration on medical image processing with the Mayo Clinic. In 1982 Atkins assumed academic leadership positions as associate dean for research and graduate programs and later interim dean of engineering at the University of Michigan. As part of a leadership team with James Duderstadt and Charles Vest, he presided over the rapid rejuvenation of the UM College of Engineering. The college, for example, replaced two-thirds of its faculty in 6 years. Atkins assisted in many aspects of this rejuvenation, but was specifically responsible for establishing one of the first and leading academic distributed computing environments, the CAEN (Computer-Aided Engineering Network), and for shifting the research culture to encompass more multidisciplinary, team-based projects often including industrial collaboration. The college’s sponsored research volume more than tripled during this 5-year period. In the early 1990s, Atkins became the founding dean of the University of Michigan School of Information (www.si.umich.edu), also known as SI. This professional graduate school (M.S. and Ph.D.) is committed to learning, research, and societal engagement through a holistic, socio-humanistic-technical approach to “bringing people, information and technology together in more valuable ways.” The UM SI has been the leader in defining and creating a new genre of “information school, or I-School” now emerging at many universities. Atkins also formed and directed an Alliance for Community Technology (ACT) sponsored by the W. K. Kellogg Foundation to support the innovative use of information technology in service of broader participation in civil society. Atkins also serves as a consultant to Kellogg on the innovative use of information and communication technology for enriching education opportunities for at-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
×

risk youth in the United States, and for both rural communities and higher education in southern Africa. Atkins is now in the early stages of developing an international consortium to help align investment and collective action among the diverse stakeholders necessary to accelerate the creation and transformative application of cyberinfrastructure for enhancing learning, research, and societal engagement—and the synergy between them.

June St. Clair Atkinson is the state superintendent of public instruction in North Carolina and has served in that role since 2005. During her career in education, she has been a public school teacher, community college instructor, and state administrator. As a member of the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, she has been a director of Career-Technical Education, director of Vocational-Technical Education, and director of Instructional Services. Atkinson has also served as president of the National Business Education Association and the National Association of State Directors for Career-Technical Education Consortium. She is currently serving as the president of the National Council of Chief State School Officers.

Camila Ballesteros is currently working as a cybersecurity intern for Montgomery College in Montgomery County, Maryland, where she is a second-year student pursuing an associate degree in software engineering. Ballesteros is a member of the student Cybersecurity Club. She is a team player with a great passion for cybersecurity, with good communication skills. Ballesteros has a capacity for learning new systems and processes quickly. She does volunteer work at Identity as a counselor/mentor working with Latino youth after school and on Saturdays to provide a safe environment where they are able to express how they feel and receive help with homework. She also volunteers for the Aces Program, helping with parent nights and after school.

Gregory Camilli is in the Graduate School of Education (GSE) as a professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at Rutgers University. Camilli was a professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at Rutgers for 23 years, and he was the chair of the department from 1996 to 1999 before joining the faculty at the University of Colorado Boulder School of Education in 2010. His research interests include early education interventions, school factors in mathematics achievement, and multilevel item response theory models. He has published many scholarly articles on topics including psychometrics, research methods and statistics, test fairness, and reading research. He is also the co-editor of multiple books about education research, and his most recent book is entitled Handbook of Complementary Methods in Education Research. He received special

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
×

recognition from the American Educational Research Association for the handbook. Camilli received his B.A. in psychology in 1975 and his M.A. and Ph.D. in education (research and evaluation methodology) in 1979 and 1980, respectively, all from the University of Colorado at Boulder. He believes that “good intentions need to be supported by evidence when designing practices, policies, or programs,” and his research has focused on both methodological approaches and substantive issues. Currently, his research projects include Bayesian regression for meta-analysis and the effects of affirmative action in law school.

J.T. (Ted) Childs, Jr. retired from IBM in August 2006 after a distinguished 39-year career as a member of their corporate human resources team. Upon retiring, he founded Ted Childs™, LLC. The role of Ted Childs™ LLC is to serve as a global “strategic diversity advisor” to senior management and a client’s workforce diversity team. While at IBM, he held a variety of human resource assignments, including 15 years of executive responsibility for global workforce diversity programs and policies. In addition, Childs served as executive assistant to Dr. Benjamin L. Hooks, executive director of the NAACP, on an IBM social service leave from March 1982 to September 1983. He is a graduate of West Virginia State University, a member of the board of directors and a past president of the university’s foundation, and a life member of the West Virginia State University National Alumni Association. In December 1989, Childs was appointed by Governor Mario Cuomo to the New York State Governor’s Advisory Council on Child Care. In 1992, he was named co-chair of the National Council of Jewish Women’s Work Family Advisory Board and was presented with their Founder’s Award for commitment to quality of life issues for U.S. families. Childs is a member of the Executive Leadership Council (ELC), The Families and Work Institute Board of Directors, and was installed as a fellow in The National Academy of Human Resources in 2001. He has received Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters degrees from Pace University (2001), West Virginia State University (2003), and Our Lady of the Elms College (2005). Childs holds life memberships in the National Association of African Americans in Human Resources, the National Council of Negro Women, Inc., the National Organization of Women (NOW), Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc., the NAACP, the Sierra Club, and the Bass Anglers Sportsmen Society.

France A. Córdova was sworn in as director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) on March 31, 2014. Nominated by President Barack Obama to head the $7.2-billion independent federal agency, she was confirmed by the U.S. Senate on March 12. Córdova leads the only government science agency charged with advancing all fields of scientific discovery, technological innovation, and science, technology, engineering and mathematics

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
×

(STEM) education. NSF’s programs and initiatives keep the United States at the forefront of science and engineering, empower future generations of scientists and engineers, and foster U.S. prosperity and global leadership. Córdova is president emerita of Purdue University, where she served as president from 2007 to 2012. From 2002 to 2007, she led the University of California, Riverside, as chancellor and was a distinguished professor of physics and astronomy. Córdova was the vice chancellor for research and professor of physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara, from 1996 to 2002. From 1993 to 1996, Córdova served as NASA’s chief scientist. Prior to joining NASA, she was on the faculty of the Pennsylvania State University where she headed the department of astronomy and astrophysics from 1989 to 1993. Córdova was deputy group leader in the Earth and space sciences division at Los Alamos National Laboratory from 1988 to 1989 and staff scientist from 1979 to 1989. She received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Stanford University and her doctorate in physics from the California Institute of Technology in 1979. More recently, Córdova served as chair of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution and on the board of trustees of Mayo Clinic. She also served as a member of the National Science Board (NSB), where she chaired the Committee on Strategy and Budget. As NSF director, she is an ex-officio member of the NSB. Córdova’s scientific contributions have been in the areas of observational and experimental astrophysics, multi-spectral research on x-ray and gamma ray sources, and space-borne instrumentation. She has published more than 150 scientific papers. In 1997, she was awarded an honorary doctorate by Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles. She is a recipient of NASA’s highest honor, the Distinguished Service Medal, and was recognized as a Kilby Laureate in 2000. The Kilby International Awards recognize extraordinary individuals who have made “significant contributions to society through science, technology, innovation, invention and education.” Córdova was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and is a National Associate of the National Academies. She is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the Association for Women In Science (AWIS). She is NSF’s 14th director, succeeding Subra Suresh who stepped down in March 2013.

Rebecca Dernberger was named vice president and general manager for Manpower’s Northeast Division in 2008. In her role, Dernberger oversees all aspects of over 70 branches of the Northeast Division. Annual U.S. revenue of Manpower is $1.7 billion and $19 billion globally. Dernberger joined Manpower in 1984 and served on the frontline of the largest U.S. franchise; eventually she became president of the franchise in 2003. She served as president until 2008 when the franchise was sold to Manpower Group. Recognized as an expert in workforce trends, Dernberger is pas-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
×

sionate about the manufacturing and skilled trades sectors. Active in the community, Dernberger currently serves as a member of The Committee of 200, the Manufacturing Institute Board, the Manpower Public Sector Board of Directors and on the Talent 2025 Board. She has served on chamber boards, economic development boards, hospital boards, diversity boards, and workforce development boards. A resident of Zeeland, Michigan, Dernberger earned her bachelor’s degree in business and psychology from Hope College in Holland, Michigan.

Kelvin K. Droegemeier earned a B.S. with special distinction in meteorology in 1980 from the University of Oklahoma, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in atmospheric science in 1982 and 1985, respectively, from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He joined the University of Oklahoma faculty in September 1985 and in 1987 was named a Presidential Young Investigator by the National Science Foundation. Droegemeier’s research interests lie in thunderstorm dynamics and predictability, variational data assimilation, mesoscale dynamics, computational fluid dynamics, massively parallel computing, and aviation weather. An expert in aviation forensic meteorology, he has served as a consultant to Honeywell Corporation, American Airlines, Continental Airlines, the National Transportation Safety Board, and Climatological Consulting Corp. In 2004, Droegemeier was appointed by President George W. Bush to a 6-year term on the National Science Board, the governing body of the National Science Foundation that also provides science policy guidance to Congress and the president. He chaired the board’s standing committee on programs and plans and task force on cost sharing, and co-chaired the Hurricane Research Task Force. In 2010, Droegemeier was nominated by President Barack Obama for a second term on the National Science Board. In 2005, Droegemeier was appointed associate vice president for research and in 2009, vice president for research at the University of Oklahoma. He is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society, former chairman of the board of the University Corporation Atmospheric Research, former member of the Microsoft Research Corporation External Advisory Board, and current member of the boards of Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge Associated Universities Foundation, Council on Governmental Relations, National Weather Museum and Science Center, and Norman, Oklahoma, chamber of commerce. He also is a trustee of Southeastern Universities Research Association.

Adam Enbar is CEO of The Flatiron School, which he co-founded to create a system of education that’s accountable for student results. Flatiron School has trained thousands of software engineers and placed them into jobs at companies like Google, Intel, and The New York Times through intensive

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
×

3- to 5-month programs. Flatiron has also partnered with the City of New York to launch the NYC Web Development Fellowship, focused exclusively on students without college degrees, over 90 percent of which come from diverse and low-income backgrounds. In 2015, Flatiron School released the industry’s first and only independently audited jobs report verifying 99 percent graduation rate with 98 percent job placement and $74,000 average starting salary for graduates. Enbar began his career as a real estate developer before moving to Boston where he worked at HubSpot, leading the National Accounts team while the company grew from 70 to 350 employees in 2 years. He then spent time working in venture capital with Charles River Ventures working with entrepreneurs in education, enterprise software, and connected devices. All the while, Enbar remained close to education, teaching first grade in Brooklyn, teacher assisting a marketing course at Harvard, and volunteer-teaching entrepreneurship at South Bay Correctional Facility in Boston. He received his B.S. from Cornell University and MBA from Harvard Business School.

Abby Estabillo is a junior electrical engineering student at the University of Maryland, College Park. She feels passionately about inspiring young girls to take interest in the STEM field. Her goals include working for an electrical engineering company and starting a platform for these young girls to express their interest in the engineering field. In the past, she interned at the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) for three summers where she worked on the EngineerGirl website. Abby continues to work for NAE as a part-time college intern. She was also an administrative assistant for a nonprofit organization called Commonweal Foundation for 3 years. In the future, Estabillo plans on looking for internships in engineering firms once she graduates college.

Kenneth (Kenny) Gibbs, Jr. is a cancer prevention fellow at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the Science of Research & Technology Branch. Gibbs conducts policy-relevant research aimed at strengthening the research enterprise. His work focuses on: biomedical graduate and postdoctoral training, workforce development and workforce diversity (specifically, understanding the mechanisms of career development among recent biomedical Ph.D. graduates and postdoctorates, and how they differ across lines of race/ethnicity and gender, so that strategies can be developed to promote inclusive excellence); and developing methodologies for evaluation and dissemination of best practices in “team science.” Prior to NCI, Gibbs completed an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science and Technology Policy Fellowship at the National Science Foundation in the Directorate for Education and Human Resources, Division of Human Resource Development. As an AAAS fellow, he contributed

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
×

to the federal government’s strategic, science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education plan by developing evidence-based recommendations for engagement programs, and initiated the Burroughs Well-come Fund supported “STEM Ph.D. Careers” research project to identify the factors impacting the career development of recent Ph.D. graduates. Gibbs completed his Ph.D. in the immunology program at Stanford University, and received his B.S. in biochemistry and molecular biology summa cum laude from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, where he was a Meyerhoff, MARC, and HHMI scholar. Gibbs serves on the board of directors for the National Postdoctoral Association. He has written about career development for Science Careers, and science diversity issues for Scientific American.

Maureen Grasso is dean of the graduate school at North Carolina State University. Over the past 14 years as a dean in graduate education, she has focused her research and strategic initiatives on enhancing student success from admission through completion. While at the University of Georgia, Grasso was instrumental in reducing time to degree and increasing completion rates, working with faculty to make program-level changes to improve mentoring, working with faculty to develop new and innovative interdisciplinary degree programs, and working with donors to endow fellowships for graduate students. She was an active participant in the Council of Graduate Schools’ Ph.D. completion project. Grasso served as a member of the Council of Graduate Schools and Educational Testing Service’s commission for Pathways Through Graduate School and Into Careers report. In 2009, she received the Award for Outstanding Contribution to Graduate Education in the Southern Region, USA. Currently she is working with faculty at North Carolina State University to enhance the success of students with a focus on best practices in mentoring. Prior to moving into graduate education, she served as a faculty member at the University of North Carolina Greensboro and began her academic career at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research has focused on the sustainable built environment with a focus on thermal and bidirectional solar optical properties of textiles. Grasso is a fellow of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers where she served as vice president and on the board of directors. She is a textile scientist holding a B.S. from Utah State University, an M.S. from Cornell, and a Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee.

Kimberly A. Green has worked extensively on federal policy impacting career and technical education (CTE) for the past 21 years. Working closely with Congress, the Administration, and a broad range of stakeholders, she represents the interests of and seeks support for CTE. In addition to this policy work, she helped establish, implement, and grow the national Career

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
×

Cluster® Initiative, the Common Career Technical Core, the CTE: Learning That Works for America Campaign and the Career Readiness Partner Council—all of which are designed to build visibility and support for CTE, while also raising the bar for CTE by ensuring consistency in the delivery of high-quality programs to students across the United States. Green represents the state directors on a variety of boards and committees, including the board of directors for the Manufacturing Skills Standards Council, the National Technical Honor Society, and the National Career Academy Coalition. She is also collaborating with the new National College and Career Readiness Center and the Great Teachers and Leaders Center and is partnering with multiple federally funded projects to expand the implementation of career pathways. She is an accomplished speaker, having presented in all 50 states and is considered a nationally recognized expert in CTE. With the support of Pell Grants and the federal work study program, she is a graduate of Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations.

Melvin Greer is senior fellow and chief strategist, Lockheed Martin. With over 29 years of systems and software engineering experience, he is a recognized expert in service oriented architecture, cloud computing, and predictive analytics. He functions as a principal investigator in advanced research studies, including nanotechnology, synthetic biology, and gamification. He significantly advances the body of knowledge in basic research and critical, highly advanced engineering and scientific disciplines. Greer has been awarded the BEYA 2012 Technologist of the Year Award, which recognizes his outstanding technical contribution and technical products that have a broad impact and high value to society as a whole. He has been recognized for his outstanding technical contributions to cloud computing and service-oriented architecture. Greer has been appointed fellow of the National Cybersecurity Institute where he assists government, industry, military, and academic sectors meet the challenges in cybersecurity policy, technology, and education. In addition to his professional and investment roles, he is founder and managing director of the Greer Institute for Leadership and Innovation, focused on research and deployment of a 21st century leadership model. Greer is fellow and adjunct faculty at the Institute For Enterprise Architecture Certification (FEAC Institute) and the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez, College of Engineering. He is also a member of the International Monetary Fund/World Bank, Bretton Woods Committee where he explores how deployment of enabling technologies relates to private sector development, commercial opportunities, global financial stability, and social responsibility. He is a frequent speaker at conferences and universities and is an accomplished author; his fourth book 21st Century Leadership is his most recently published book. As a popular educator and board member at a number of Historical Black Colleges and Universities,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
×

Greer is leading science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) research initiatives, directly trying to shape a more diverse generation of up- and-coming technical talent. He received his B.S. in computer information systems and technology and his M.S. in information systems from American University, Washington, D.C. He also completed the executive leadership program at the Cornell University, Johnson Graduate School.

Gary Hoachlander is president of ConnectEd: The California Center for College and Career. Beginning his career in 1966 as a brakeman for the Western Maryland Railroad, he has devoted his professional life to helping young people learn by doing—connecting education to the opportunities, challenges, and many different rewards to be found through work. Widely known for his expertise in career and technical education, high school improvement, Linked Learning, and many other aspects of elementary, secondary, and postsecondary education, Hoachlander has consulted extensively for the U.S. Department of Education, state departments of education, local school districts, foundations, and a variety of other organizations. He earned his B.A. degree at Princeton University and holds a master’s and Ph.D. degree from the Department of City and Regional Planning, University of California, Berkeley. Prior to founding ConnectEd, he spent 30 years as the founder and president of MPR Associates, Inc., one of the nation’s leading education consulting firms, with offices in Berkeley, Washington, D.C., and Portland Oregon.

Rush D. Holt, Jr. became the 18th chief executive officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and executive publisher of the Science family of journals in February 2015. In this role, Holt leads the world’s largest multidisciplinary scientific and engineering society. Over his long career, Holt has held positions as a teacher, scientist, administrator, and policymaker. From 1987 to 1998, Holt was assistant director of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), a U.S. Department of Energy national lab, which is the largest research facility of Princeton University and one of the largest alternative energy research facilities in the country. From 1980 to 1988, Holt served on the faculty of Swarthmore College, where he taught courses in physics and public policy. In 1982, he took leave from Swarthmore to serve as an AAAS/American Physical Society Science and Technology Policy Fellow on Capitol Hill. He also served as an arms control expert at the U.S. State Department, where he monitored the nuclear programs of countries such as Iraq, Iran, North Korea, and the former Soviet Union. In 1981, Holt was issued a patent for an improved solar-pond technology for harnessing energy from sunlight. Before coming to AAAS, Holt served for 16 years as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, representing New Jersey’s 12th Congressional District. In

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
×

Congress, Holt served as a senior member of the Committee on Natural Resources and the Committee on Education and the Workforce. On Capitol Hill, Holt established a long track record of advocacy for federal investment in research and development, science education, and innovation. He served on the National Commission on the Teaching of Mathematics and Science (known as the Glenn Commission), founded the Congressional Research and Development Caucus, and served as a co-chair of the Biomedical Research Caucus. Holt served 8 years on the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and, from 2007 to 2010, chaired the Select Intelligence Oversight Panel, which worked to strengthen legislative oversight of the intelligence community. His legislative work earned him numerous accolades, including being named one of Scientific American magazine’s “50 National Visionaries Contributing to a Brighter Technological Future” and a “Champion of Science” by the Science Coalition. From December 2014 to February 2015, Holt was appointed a Director’s Visiting Scholar at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. Holt is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, and he holds M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from New York University. He is an elected fellow of AAAS, the American Physical Society, and Sigma Xi, and he holds honorary degrees from Monmouth University, Rider University, and Thomas Edison State College.

Freeman A. Hrabowski, president of UMBC (University of Maryland, Baltimore County) since 1992, is a consultant on science and math education to national agencies, universities, and school systems. He was recently named by President Obama to chair the newly created President’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for African Americans. He also chaired the National Academies’ committee that produced the recent report, Expanding Underrepresented Minority Participation: America’s Science and Technology Talent at the Crossroads. Named one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World by TIME (2012) and one of America’s Best Leaders by U.S. News & World Report (2008), he also received TIAA-CREF’s Theodore M. Hesburgh Award for Leadership Excellence (2011), the Carnegie Corporation’s Academic Leadership Award (2011), and the Heinz Award (2012) for contributions to improving the “Human Condition.” UMBC has been recognized as a model for academic innovation and inclusive excellence by such publications as U.S. News, which the past 6 years ranked UMBC the #1 “Up and Coming” university in the nation.

Olivia Khalili works with companies to design, implement, and evaluate social benefit initiatives. She leads Yahoo’s social impact program, Yahoo for Good. Previously, Khalili worked with Ashoka to create employee engagement and brand building programs that connected social entrepre-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
×

neurs with companies including American Express and Ben & Jerry’s. In 2008, she founded CauseCapitalism.com, an online resource that helps businesses grow by incorporating a social mission. Her approach stems from cross-sector experience working with tech startups and nonprofits, and in international development in Micronesia. Connect with her on twitter at @OKL.

Irwin S. Kirsch is the director of the Center for Global Assessment at Educational Testing Service (ETS). He earned his Ph.D. in Educational Measurement, Reading/Literacy from the University of Delaware in 1982. Since joining ETS in 1984, he has directed a number of large-scale assessments in the area of literacy, including the National Adult Literacy Survey, and the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) Young Adult Literacy Survey. He was also a key person in establishing the International Adult Literacy Surveys and has directed them for ETS since 1993. In 1987, he received the ETS Research Scientist Award for his work in the area of literacy and was named as an ETS Distinguished Presidential Appointee in 1999. Kirsch currently manages several large-scale surveys, including the Adult Education Program Study with the U.S. Department of Education and the Literacy Assessment and Monitoring Program with the UNESCO Institute for Statistics. Kirsch also chairs the Reading Expert Group for the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), Programme for International Student Assessment and has been involved with several efforts aimed at defining and measuring information and communication technology (ICT) skills. In this area, he has directed an international panel for ETS that defined ICT literacy, has designed and conducted a feasibility study on ICT literacy for the OECD, and participates on an OECD advisory panel aimed at establishing a new survey of adult skills for the 21st century.

Jeff Livingston spent more than a decade as a senior executive at McGraw-Hill Education. Most recently, he was senior vice president of Education Policy and Strategic Alliances. During Livingston’s time at McGraw-Hill, he variously held general management responsibility for intervention, career and technical education, supplemental publishing, advanced placement, adult basic education, workforce training, fine arts, and college readiness. Before being promoted to lead businesses, he served as vice president of marketing for the McGraw-Hill Learning Group. He also previously served as the vice president of urban markets, database marketing and inside sales. Before joining McGraw-Hill Education in 2004, Livingston was a successful entrepreneur with specialties in instructional technology and marketing to urban school systems. As co-founder, president, and chief operating officer of Achieva.com, he helped to build the largest provider of online test prep

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
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and college prep for American high schools. In the early 1990s, he spent several years in investment banking and trading of financial derivatives for Merrill Lynch. In July 2015, Livingston left McGraw-Hill Education to begin a sabbatical focused on finding creative solutions to important educational problems. So far, his explorations have taken him to for-profit universities in Brazil, apprenticeship programs in Serbia and Spain, universal pre-K implementations in several American cities, Early College High Schools in New York and California, and Historically Black Colleges and Universities looking to reinvent themselves for 21st-century relevance. In addition to continuing to invest in and advise Edtech start-ups, he intends to visit low cost, private primary schools in India and Africa during his sabbatical. Livingston holds a baccalaureate degree in government from Harvard University. He has served as a director of the Association of Educational Publishers, the Association of American Publishers-Education Division, the Software and Information Industry Association, and the Harlem Educational Activities Fund. He is also an adviser to the ASU/GSV Innovation Summit and South by Southwest EDU.

Mary Alice McCarthy joined the Higher Education Policy Team at the New America Foundation, where she serves as a senior policy analyst and focuses on the intersection between higher education, postsecondary career and technical education, and workforce development programs. Most recently, she was a member of the Policy, Research and Evaluation Staff team at the Office of Vocational and Adult Education (OVAE) at the U.S. Department of Education. She is leading a variety of policy reform and evaluation efforts in the areas of postsecondary career and technical education, career pathways, credentialing, and competency-based education models. Since joining OVAE, she established the Interagency Working Group on Career Pathways, which is composed of staff from the U.S. Departments of Education, Health and Human Services, and Labor and works to better align federal investments and policy in education, training, and employment services to support career advancement. She also serves as OVAE’s liaison to the U.S. Department of Labor’s Trade Act Assistance Community College and Training grants programs, collaborating on the development of the grant solicitations and technical assistance strategies. Prior to joining OVAE, McCarthy worked in the Office of Workforce Investment in the Employment and Training Administration at the U.S. Department of Labor, where she specialized in improving training and employment services for adult and dislocated workers. She directed the Career Pathways Initiative, cosponsored by OVAE, providing technical assistance to nine states and two tribal entities on the development of career pathway systems. McCarthy has a master’s degree in public administration from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and a Ph.D. in political science from

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
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the University of North Carolina. At Harvard, she was the 2009 fellow in philanthropy at the Hauser Center for Nonprofit Organizations, where she conducted research on the role of philanthropic organizations in supporting innovative approaches to workforce development and adult education.

Jennifer McNelly is the president of The Manufacturing Institute, the nonprofit affiliate of the National Association of Manufacturers. The Manufacturing Institute is the authority on the attraction, qualification, and development of world-class manufacturing talent. As president, McNelly drives an agenda focused on improving and expanding manufacturing in the United States through education, innovation, and research. Prior to joining the Institute, Jennifer, a member of the Senior Executive Service for the U.S. Department of Labor, also served as the senior vice president of Strategic Partnerships, LLC. She is currently chair of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Advanced Manufacturing.

Christine Ortiz is the dean for graduate education and the Morris Cohen Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Ortiz earned her B.S. from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and M.S. and Ph.D. from Cornell University, all in the field of materials science and engineering, with a minor in theoretical and applied mechanics. After graduation, she was granted an NSF-NATO postdoctoral fellowship, which she used to carry out research in the Department of Polymer Chemistry, University of Groningen, in the Netherlands, where she worked in the area of single-molecule mechanics. Ortiz then joined the MIT Department of Materials Science and Engineering as a tenure-track faculty member and developed a research program that focuses on the multiscale mechanics of musculoskeletal and exoskeletal structural biological materials, with the primary goal being to quantify and understand new mechanisms, phenomena, and design principles and how they determine function, quality, and pathology. Ortiz has over 160 scientific publications in more than 20 academic journals. She has given more than 130 invited lectures on her research, over 35 of which were international, and at 9 topically different Gordon Research Conferences. Ortiz has supervised more than 80 students from 10 different academic disciplines. She has received over 30 national and international honors. Ortiz has served on the editorial boards of Science, Advanced Biomaterials, Transactions of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and Applied Mechanics Reviews. She has served as a reviewer for the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, NASA, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Ortiz is the founding and current faculty director of the MIT International Science and Technology Initiatives (MISTI)-Israel program. She has served on over 25 institute and departmental committees and in her current role as dean for graduate

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
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education leads areas, which include fellowships, personal support, professional development, policies and procedures, educational innovation, academic performance, graduate admissions administration, diversity initiatives, immigration, community-building, and institute-wide data analysis.

Ruan Pethiyagoda is chief strategy officer of Hack Reactor Core, the leading network of data-driven educational programs. Pethiyadoa’s role includes student outcomes, employer partnerships, public policy, compliance, and corporate development. His team supports and scales these critical functions at top schools in California, Texas, and the Midwest, training and placing over 1,000 engineers per year into the software industry. Prior to joining Hack Reactor, he worked as an investigative journalist covering war crimes, arms trafficking, corruption, and politics in and around Sri Lanka.

DeRionne P. Pollard, president of Montgomery College, is committed to empowering students to change their lives and enriching the life of the community. Montgomery College, one of largest undergraduate institutions in the state of Maryland, serves nearly 60,000 credit and noncredit students annually at its three campuses. Pollard assumed leadership of Montgomery College on August 2, 2010, following a national search by the college’s board of trustees. Since her inauguration, she has spearheaded the development of a new Montgomery College mission and Montgomery College 2020, the institution’s strategic plan. Other priorities have included partnering with Montgomery County Public Schools and the Universities of Shady Grove in the creation of Achieving Collegiate Excellence and Success (ACES), a support program designed to help students transition from high school to college completion. Pollard is passionate about providing higher education opportunities to all students and seeking innovative ways to increase their success. During 2012, the Montgomery College Board of Trustees voted to take a position in support of the ballot question on the Maryland Dream Act. Pollard served as a public advocate and vocal supporter for the law, which was passed by the voters of Maryland to provide in-state tuition rates to undocumented college-aged students. She recently served on the American Association of Community Colleges’ 21st Century Commission on the Future of Community Colleges and the Commission on Academic, Student, and Community Development. Pollard is a member of the Community College Advisory Panel at the College Board and the Higher Education Research and Development Institute Advisory Board. Closer to home, Pollard serves on several boards, including Montgomery County Business Development Corporation, Montgomery County Chamber of Commerce, Universities of Shady Grove, the Tech Council of Maryland, IMPACT Silver Spring, and Generation Hope. Pollard formerly served as president of Las Positas College in Livermore, California. Her community

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
×

college career began at College of Lake County (Illinois) as a faculty member in English. Pollard received her Ph.D. in educational leadership and policy studies in higher education from Loyola University Chicago and her M.A. and B.A. in English from Iowa State University.

Sanjay Rai, senior vice president for Academic Affairs at Montgomery College, is an outspoken champion and ardent supporter of innovations that advance community college student success in academic, career, technical, and workforce development programs. He has provided leadership for the redesign of the general education and general studies programs, for curriculum alignment with K-12 and 4-year colleges and universities, ensuring that Montgomery College’s programs reflect the impact of technology, globalization, and workforce alignment—critical factors in student success today. A strong advocate for professional development, Rai’s leadership for 500 full-time and 1,000 part-time faculty has focused on ensuring that content and pedagogy are current in dynamic science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields such as cybersecurity, biotechnology, engineering, and health science. He has developed innovative partnerships with local and global businesses that have resulted in Montgomery College becoming a center for continuing education and training for already skilled workers, as well as an on-ramp for people starting or changing careers. He is currently serving as chair of the Maryland Council of Community College Chief Academic Officers (CAOs), an affinity group of Maryland community college CAOs, and is on the boards of the Tech Council of Maryland, the Indian Biomedical Association, and the Montgomery College Life Sciences Park Foundation. Prior to serving as the College’s chief academic officer, Rai led the Germantown Campus as vice president and provost, and also served as the dean of science, engineering, and mathematics at the Rock-ville Campus. He has been successful in securing a number of nationally completive grants for programs in these areas. Preceding his tenure at Montgomery College, he was chair of the Department of Mathematics at Jacksonville University, Florida, where he also was a tenured full professor. Rai completed a Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, an M.S. in mathematics from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada, and an M.S. in mathematics and a B.S. in statistics, physics, and mathematics from the University of Allahabad in India. He is a graduate of Leadership Montgomery’s Class of 2009 and has served on the board of directors for Leadership Montgomery, the Gaithersburg Germantown Chamber of Commerce, Tech Council of Maryland, and the BlackRock Center for the Arts. His publications are in applied mathematics (modeling HIV using differential equations) and mathematics education. His most recent book, Pathways to Real Analysis, was published in April 2009.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
×

William “Bill” Rudman is the executive director of the AHIMA Foundation and vice president of Education Visioning for the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA). Before taking this job, Rudman worked for 20 years in academia as a professor in health information management. Rudman also served as the director of the Health Information Technology Core for the Delta Regional Institute and oversaw implementation of an electronic record exchange in rural Mississippi. He served on the state of Mississippi Task force for health information exchange and chaired the education committee. Rudman was the principal investigator (PI) on the HISPC grant for education and training for the implementation on electronic medical records for the state of Tennessee. In addition to hands on experience in the development, implementation, and training of those working in the field of HIM, Rudman has an extensive list of presentations, publications, and health information technology grants. Rudman has published over 70 scholarly articles, made 140 scholarly presentations, and received over $70 million in federal funded grants. Among those grants, Rudman served as either a PI or co-PI on funding for the Southern Mississippi health information exchange (at the time the largest operating HIE in the United States), a rural e-network of Mississippi hospitals, and a telemedicine grant to connect hospitals in the Delta Region in Mississippi.

Russell W. Rumberger is professor of education in the Gevirtz Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Santa Barbara. A faculty member at UCSB since 1987, Rumberger has published widely in several areas of education: education and work; the schooling of disadvantaged students, particularly school dropouts and linguistic minority students; school effectiveness; and education policy. In the fall of 2011, he completed a book, Dropping Out: Why Students Drop Out of High School and What Can Be Done About It, which was be published by Harvard University Press. He served as a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Increasing High School Students’ Engagement and Motivation to Learn (2004), the Committee on the Impact of Mobility and Change on the Lives of Young Children, Schools, and Neighborhoods (2010), and the Committee on Improved Measurement of High School Dropout and Completion Rates (2011). He also served as a panel member for the Institute of Education Sciences’ Practice Guide, Dropout Prevention (2008). From 2010 to 2012 he served as Vice Provost for Education Partnerships, University of California Office of the President, where he was responsible for the university’s engagement in P-20 education in California, including policies and programs that produce high-quality teachers and promote achievement and college access for all students. He currently directs the California Dropout Research Project, which is producing a series of reports and policy briefs about the dropout problem in California and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
×

a state policy agenda to improve California’s high school graduation rate). Professor Rumberger received a Ph.D. in education and an M.A. in economics from Stanford University and a B.S. in electrical engineering from Carnegie-Mellon University.

Liz Simon is the vice president of Legal & External Affairs at General Assembly (GA), which is pioneering a new kind of education for a global community of entrepreneurs and professionals. Her responsibilities include leading the GA’s legal affairs, government and regulatory interactions, public affairs programs, and social impact work. Simon joined GA from the Obama Administration, where she served as counselor to the director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services and worked on policy issues at the nexus of immigration and entrepreneurship. Prior to that, she was an attorney at Hogan Lovells, a Washington, D.C.-based law firm. Simon holds a bachelor’s degree in government from Cornell University and earned a J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School.

Debra W. Stewart, former president of the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS), became president of CGS in July 2000. She holds degrees from Marquette University, the University of Maryland, and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. In 1975, she joined the North Carolina State University faculty and was professor of political science and public administration from 1984 to 2000. In 1983, she became associate dean of the graduate school at North Carolina State and dean of the graduate school in 1988. In 1994, she served as interim chancellor at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro. Prior to joining CGS, she was vice chancellor and dean of the graduate school at North Carolina State University. Stewart’s service to graduate education includes chairing the GRE® (Graduate Record Examinations®) Board, the Council on Research Policy and Graduate Education, the Board of Directors of Oak Ridge Associated Universities, and the board of directors of CGS. She also served as vice chair of the ETS Board of Trustees, Trustee of the Triangle Center for Advanced Studies, and member of the American Council on Education Board and several National Research Council Committees. In November 2007, her leadership in graduate education was recognized by the Université Pierre et Marie Curie with an honorary doctorate. Her alma mater, the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, honored her in October 2008 with the Distinguished Alumna Award. Stewart is author, co-author, and editor of books and numerous scholarly articles on administrative theory and public policy. She lectures nationally and internationally on graduate education issues and challenges. Her research focuses on ethics in managerial decision making.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
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Shelley Westman is currently vice president, Operations & Strategic Integration Initiatives, which is a new role in the Security Business Unit designed to focus on overall operations as well as key projects and strategic initiatives across the newly formed unit. As part of this role, she also leads the University Programs for IBM Security and is involved in several IBM boards and committees on hiring and skills. Westman is the founder of “WISE”—Women in Security Excelling. Immediately prior to this role, she was vice president, Security Growth Initiatives & Operations, Security Services. Prior to this she spent 15 years in IBM’s System and Technology Group (STG) where her most recent assignment was vice president, Strategy. In this role Westman was responsible for leading and guiding STG’s overall strategy, with a focus on transforming the strategy to a market-centric strategy, addressing opportunity and performance gaps, and driving alignment between strategy and execution. Westman’s previous roles in STG included the vice president and business line executive, Systems Software and Security, where she had responsibility for the STG strategy, revenue growth, and execution around Systems Software and Security. She has held a number of other key roles at IBM including director of Power Systems, director of development operations and roles in alliance management, procurement, forecasting, and contracts. Prior to joining IBM, Westman practiced law in Raleigh for 5 years. She concentrated her practice in the area of civil litigation. She has a J.D., with honors, from the University of North Carolina, School of Law. Her undergraduate degree is from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst where she graduated cum laude.

Holly Zanville is a strategy director at Lumina Foundation where she leads the development of plans and strategies to help create new systems of quality credentials and credits defined by learning and competencies rather than time, clear and transparent pathways to students, high-quality learning, and alignment with workforce needs and trends. Her portfolio includes a focus on improving outcomes of developmental education, increasing degree completion for returning adults with prior college/no credential, and statewide approaches to reverse-transfer degrees through the national Credit When It’s Due initiative. Zanville’s work experience spans the educational pipeline with prior service in K-12, community colleges, universities, and higher education governance systems. Most recently, Zanville served as coordinator of Oregon’s Joint Boards K-20 Redesign Initiative; senior academic officer, Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board; and associate vice chancellor for Academic Affairs, Oregon University System. Zanville received her Ph.D. in educational administration from the University of Minnesota; M.A. in English from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and B.A. in English and biology from Lindenwood University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21900.
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Next: Appendix C: Anonymous Participant Responses to the Pre-summit Question »
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The future competitiveness of the United States in an increasingly interconnected global economy depends on the nation fostering a workforce with strong capabilities and skills in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). STEM knowledge and skills enable both individual opportunity and national competitiveness, and the nation needs to develop ways of ensuring access to high-quality education and training experiences for all students at all levels and for all workers at all career stages.

The National Science Foundation (NSF) holds a primary responsibility for overseeing the federal government’s efforts to foster the creation of a STEM-capable workforce. As part of its efforts in this endeavor, NSF’s Directorate on Education and Human Resources asked the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to convene a workshop that would contribute to NSF’s preparation of a theoretical and evidence-based STEM Workforce Development R&D Core Framework. Participants discussed research themes, identified gaps and emerging research opportunities, and recommended refinements in the goals of the framework. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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