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Measures of Community Resilience for Local Decision Makers: Proceedings of a Workshop (2017)

Chapter: Appendix C Planning Committee, Speakers, and Moderator Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Planning Committee, Speakers, and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Measures of Community Resilience for Local Decision Makers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21911.
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Appendix C

Planning Committee, Speakers, and Moderator Biographies

WORKSHOP PLANNING COMMITTEE

John Carberry, an adjunct professor of chemical engineering at the University of Delaware, retired from DuPont as Director of Environmental Technology in 2007. At DuPont, he was responsible for recommending technology programs for operations improvement and product development based on environmental issues. From 1989 until retirement, he led that function to provide excellence in treatment and remediation while in transition to waste prevention and product sustainability. Mr. Carberry presently consults on environmental issues, emphasizing energy, renewable energy, persistent materials and nanomaterials. He was a founding member of the AIChE’s Center for Waste Reduction Technologies and the Green Power Market Development Group. Mr. Carberry chairs the AIChE Project on Metrics for Liquid Bio-fuels, has given over 135 presentations at universities and public conferences, and recently served on the National Academy of Engineering’s Roundtable for Sustainability. He was chair of the National Academy Committee on the Destruction of the Non-Stockpile Chemical Weapons, and served on nine previous National Academy Committees. He holds a B.ChE. and an M.E. in Chemical Engineering from Cornell University, an MBA from the University of Delaware, is a fellow of the AIChE and is a registered professional engineer.

Susan Cutter is a Carolina Distinguished Professor of Geography at the University of South Carolina where she directs the Hazards and Vulnerability Research Institute. Her primary research interests are in the area of disaster vulnerability/resilience science—what makes people and the places where they live vulnerable to extreme events and how vulnerability and resilience are measured, monitored, and assessed? She has authored or edited 13 books, and more than 150 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters. Dr. Cutter has led post-disaster field studies of the role of geographic information technologies in rescue and relief operations in (September 11th World Trade Center attack) and studies of evacuation behavior from Three Mile Island (1979), Hurricane Floyd (1999), and the Graniteville, S.C. Train Derailment and Chlorine Spill (2005). In 2006, she led a Hurricane Katrina post-event field team and ensuing 5-year study to examine the long-term recovery along the Mississippi Coast. In 2012, she led a Hurricane Sandy recovery team to examine the differential recovery along New Jersey’s coast. She has provided expert testimony to Congress on hazards and vulnerability, was a member of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers IPET team evaluating the social impacts of the New Orleans and Southeast Louisiana Hurricane Protection System in response to Hurricane Katrina, and was a juror for the “Rebuild by Design” competition for Hurricane Sandy reconstruction. Her policy-relevant work focuses on emergency management and disaster recovery at local, state,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Planning Committee, Speakers, and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Measures of Community Resilience for Local Decision Makers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21911.
×

national, and international levels, with funding from the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the United States Geological Survey, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Department of Homeland Security, South Carolina’s Emergency Management Division and State Law Enforcement Division, and Florida’s Department of Health. Dr. Cutter serves on many national advisory boards and committees including those of National Research Council, the AAAS, the National Science Foundation, the Natural Hazards Center, the National Institute of Standards and Technology. She also served as Vice-Chair of the Integrated Research on Disaster Risk (IRDR) Science Committee supported by the International Social Science Council, the International Council for Science, and the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction. Dr. Cutter serves as co-executive editor of Environment, associate editor of Weather, Climate, and Society, and on the Advisory Board of the Journal of Extreme Events. She also is serving as the Editor-in-Chief for the Oxford Research Encyclopedias Natural Hazard Science. She received her B.A. from California State University, East Bay and her M.A. and Ph.D. (1976) from the University of Chicago.

Gerald Galloway, Jr. is a Glenn L. Martin Institute Professor of Engineering and an affiliate professor of Public Policy at the University of Maryland, College Park. His 38-year career in the military included positions such as commander of the Army Corps of Engineers District in Vicksburg, Mississippi; member of the Mississippi River Commission; and professor and founding head of the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering and dean of the Academic Board at the U.S. Military Academy. He retired from the Army in 1995 as a Brigadier General. Dr. Galloway earned his M.S.E. at Princeton and his Ph.D. in geography (specializing in water resources) from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A civil engineer, public administrator, and geographer, Dr. Galloway’s current research focuses on the development of U.S. national water policy and disaster resilience in general and national floodplain management policy in particular. Prior to joining the University of Maryland, he was vice president, Geospatial Strategies, for the ES3 Sector of the Titan Corporation. He was a 6-year member of the National Research Council’s Water Science and Technology Board and has served as chair or member of 13 National Research Council Committees. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Public Administration. During this workshop, Dr. Galloway served as a planning committee member, speaker, and panel moderator.

Chris Poland is a world renowned authority on earthquake engineering and champion of disaster resilience. His passion for vibrant, sustainable, and healthy communities drives his consulting practice. He focuses on community resilience and the buildings and systems that contribute to it. Mr. Poland is the past chair of the Advisory Committee to the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program, and current chairman of the Advisory Committee on Structural Safety of Department of Veterans Affairs Facilities. As chair of the 100th Anniversary Earthquake Conference in San Francisco in April 2006, he shared the stage with California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and Senator Dianne Feinstein in an internationally covered event that brought the nation to think proactively about earthquake danger. He served as the chair of the American Society of Civil Engineers Seismic Rehabilitation of Existing Buildings Standards Committee completing both ASCE 31 and ASCE 41, standards for the evaluation and rehabilitation of existing buildings that are used worldwide. Mr. Poland serves on the Board of Directors for the San Francisco Planning & Urban Research Association, co-chairs their Resilient City Initiative and led the publication of “The Disaster Resilient City.” He also served on the Board for the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce and continues as co-chair of the San Francisco Lifelines Council with City Administrator Naomi Kelly. Mr. Poland was inducted into the National Academy of Engineering in 2009. He is also a fellow of the American Council of Engineering Companies and the American Society of Civil Engineers Structural Engineering Institute. He is an honorary member of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute and the Structural Engineers Association of California. His structural engineering career spans 40+ years and includes new design work, seismic analysis and strengthening of existing buildings, structural failure analysis, and historic preservation. Mr. Poland received his M.S. in structural engineering from Stanford University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Planning Committee, Speakers, and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Measures of Community Resilience for Local Decision Makers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21911.
×

MODERATORS

Susan Cutter is a Carolina Distinguished Professor of Geography at the University of South Carolina (see her biography under Planning Committee.)

Gerald Galloway, Jr. is a Glenn L. Martin Institute Professor of Engineering and an affiliate professor of Public Policy at the University of Maryland, College Park. (See his biography under Planning Committee.)

Chris Poland is a world renowned authority on earthquake engineering and champion of disaster resilience. (See his biography under Planning Committee.)

Monica Schoch-Spana is an associate professor in the Department of Anthropology at Texas State University (TSU). Prior to her TSU appointment, Dr. Schoch-Spana served as senior associate with the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center’s (UPMC) Center for Health Security and assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. She works with the center to provide independent research, analysis, and nonpartisan recommendations to policymakers responsible for mitigating the public health impacts of major disasters and epidemics. Her research interests include disaster resilience, community engagement, and public health emergency preparedness. Since 1998, Schoch-Spana has briefed federal, state, and local officials, as well as medical, public health, and public safety professionals on critical issues in health security. National advisory roles include serving on the Steering Committee of the Disaster Roundtable of the National Research Council (NRC), the Institute of Medicine Standing Committee on Health Threats Resilience, and the NRC Committee on Increasing National Resilience to Hazards and Disasters. She has organized 3 national conferences, delivered over 100 talks, and published over 50 peer-reviewed articles, editorials, chapters, and proceedings—principally on the role of citizens and civil society in managing disasters and epidemics. Her studies have been influential in debunking myths and misconceptions about mass behaviors in the context of bioterrorism and other health crises and in reframing the management of catastrophic health events to include social, ethical-moral, and governance dimensions. In 2003, she helped establish the UPMC Center for Health Security (formerly the Center for Biosecurity); she previously worked at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Civilian Biodefense Strategies starting in 1998. She received her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology from Johns Hopkins University (1998).

SPEAKERS

Lauren Alexander Augustine is the director of the Program on Risk, Resilience, and Extreme Events in the Office of Special Projects in the Division of Policy and Global Affairs, and she serves as the associate executive director of the Division of Earth and Life Studies. In this role, she directs the Resilient America Roundtable and the International Forum on CBRN Resilience. She also is the staff lead for the cross-Academies Resilience Working Group. She serves on the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Risk and Resilience, and she is a member of the Advisory Board for the American Geophysical Union’s Thriving Earth Exchange program. Agustine joined the Academies in 2002. In her tenure at the Academies, she was a study director on the Water Science and Technology Board; from 2007-2014, she served as the country director for the African Science Academy Development Initiative (ASADI), a cross-academies program that builds scientific capacity in national academies of science in eight African countries. From 2008-2013, she directed the Disasters Roundtable. Her most recent positions entail her developing a portfolio on natural disasters and ways that science can inform policy to reduce the risk and elevate society’s resilience to them. Augustine earned her B.S. in applied mathematics and systems engineering and her Master’s degree in environmental planning and policy from the University of Virginia; she completed her Ph.D. in an interdisciplinary program that combined hydrology, geomorphology, and landscape ecology from Harvard University.

Arrietta Chakos is a consultant in urban resilience policy. Her specialties include disaster risk assessment, disaster loss estimates, public policy development, multi-party negotiations, and municipal government operations. She

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Planning Committee, Speakers, and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Measures of Community Resilience for Local Decision Makers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21911.
×

recently served as director of the Acting in Time Advance Disaster Recovery project at the Harvard Kennedy School, which was involved with disaster policy research and application. A seismic safety advocate, she was assistant city manager in Berkeley, California until 2007 and managed the city’s intergovernmental coordination and hazard mitigation initiatives. She directed California’s first municipal hazard mitigation plan aimed at sustainable risk reduction. Berkeley’s mitigation efforts are nationally recognized and use innovative tax incentives and locally funded programs to promote community resilience. Chakos worked with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for its report to the Congress on all hazards risk mitigation, and with the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (CalEMA) on natural hazards projects and seismic safety legislation. She served as a technical advisor to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) on its international seismic safety program for schools; the World Bank on disaster risk reduction and sustainable development in the metropolitan Istanbul region; and with the National Research Council’s research on community disaster resilience. She has also advised on a recent Ford Foundation study on Stafford Act implementation in the Gulf Coast region; as well as with the Association of Bay Area Governments; the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute; GeoHazards International; the Center for Biosecurity; and the Natural Hazards Center on disaster policy issues. Publications include papers on disaster risk reduction for technical conferences; the American Society of Civil Engineers; Spectra, an engineering professional publication; the Natural Hazards’ Observer; the United Nations Journal, Regional Development, and as a contributor to Keeping Schools Safe in Earthquake Country (OECD, 2004) and Global Warming, Natural Hazards, and Emergency Management (2009). She received a B.A. from California State University, Humboldt and a M.P.A. from the Harvard Kennedy School.

Jessica Martin is former director of the Boston Indicators Project (bostonindicators.org), a special initiative of the Boston Foundation (tbf.org) that aims to deepen civic understanding of the region’s key trends, challenges and opportunities using high-quality, open data. In this role, she led the project’s work with a broad set of partners including the Metropolitan Area Planning Council, City of Boston and numerous public and nonprofit agencies to track and report Boston’s progress on a set of measurable goals across 10 sectors, to build the capacity of communities to access and use data, and to inform civic dialogue and decisions with high-quality analysis and reports on the state of Boston, its neighborhoods and the region. She is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and the John W. McCormack School of Policy Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Boston and worked as an analyst in the private sector before joining the Boston Foundation in 2007.

Bethany Wilcoxon joined the Capital Crossroads implementation team as Strategic Coordinator in September of 2014. Capital Crossroads is a regional vision plan which leverages opportunity, talent, and sustainability to ensure Central Iowa continues to grow and prosper for current and future generations. The vision plan aspires to make Central Iowa the Trails and Wellness Capital of the world, where big city opportunity can be found in a place where you can breathe. She is charged with the operational management of Capital Crossroads to ensure that the initiative continues to be a national leader in holistic, community, economic, and workforce development strategic implementation, driving the region to even greater levels of success and national recognition. Originally from Atlantic, Wilcoxon is a graduate of Iowa State University’s Community and Regional Planning program. She spent several years serving Iowa Great Places, a grant program of the Iowa Department of Cultural Affairs, and then leading the development of The Tomorrow Plan, a $3.1 million regional initiative to advance sustainability in Greater Des Moines. Her accomplishments include Global Shapers Des Moines Founding Curator (2015), ISU STATEment Maker (2012), Next American Vanguard (2010), and Greater Des Moines Leadership Institute (Class of 2011-2012). Outside of her professional work, she has led Des Moines’ Urban Ambassadors as President, served on the Board of the Drake Neighborhood Association, and has volunteered for Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (2014 Woman of the Year Candidate), Big Brothers Big Sisters, the Des Moines Symphony, and the Des Moines Metro Opera. Wilcoxon believes in fostering relationships to create unique opportunities for community collaboration and to rally people together.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Planning Committee, Speakers, and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Measures of Community Resilience for Local Decision Makers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21911.
×
Page 37
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Planning Committee, Speakers, and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Measures of Community Resilience for Local Decision Makers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21911.
×
Page 38
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Planning Committee, Speakers, and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Measures of Community Resilience for Local Decision Makers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21911.
×
Page 39
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Planning Committee, Speakers, and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Measures of Community Resilience for Local Decision Makers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21911.
×
Page 40
Measures of Community Resilience for Local Decision Makers: Proceedings of a Workshop Get This Book
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The 2012 National Research Council report, Disaster Resilience: A National Imperative, identified the development and use of resilience measures as critical to building resilient communities. Although many kinds of resilience measures and measuring tools have and continue to be developed, very few communities consistently use them as part of their planning or resilience building efforts. Since federal or top-down programs to build resilience often yield mixed results, bottom-up approaches are needed, but are often difficult for communities to implement alone. A major challenge for many communities in developing their own approaches to resilience measures is identifying a starting point and defining the process. Other challenges include lack of political will due to competing priorities and limited resources, finite time and staff to devote to developing resilience measures, lack of data availability and/or inadequate data sharing among community stakeholders, and a limited understanding of hazards and/or risks.

Building on existing work, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine organized a workshop in July 2015 to facilitate the exchange of knowledge and information about ways to advance the development and implementation of resilience measures by and within diverse communities. Participants worked to gain a better understanding of the challenges these communities face in the pursuit of resilience and determine whether the approach used during this workshop can help guide communities in their efforts to build their own measures of resilience. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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