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Analytic Research Foundations for the Next-Generation Electric Grid (2016)

Chapter: Appendix B: Committee Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Analytic Research Foundations for the Next-Generation Electric Grid. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21919.
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B

Committee Biographies

JOHN GUCKENHEIMER, Co-Chair, holds the A.R. Bullis Chair of Mathematics in the Department of Mathematics at Cornell University. Earlier in his career (1973-1985), he was at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He was a Guggenheim fellow in 1984 and was elected president of SIAM in 1996. Dr. Guckenheimer received a B.A. from Harvard University in 1966 and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1970. His book Nonlinear Oscillations, Dynamical Systems and Bifurcation of Vector Fields (with Philip Holmes) is an extensively cited work on dynamical systems that was awarded the 2013 Steele Prize for Mathematical Exposition by the American Mathematical Society. He has made contributions in several other disciplines, ranging from neuroscience to fluid dynamics to numerical analysis of dynamical systems with multiple time scales.

THOMAS J. OVERBYE, Co-Chair, a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), is the Fox Family Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, where he has taught since 1991. He received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His current research interests include electric power system analysis, visualization, dynamics, cybersecurity, and modeling of power system geomagnetic disturbances. Professor Overbye is the original developer of the PowerWorld Simulator, a cofounder of PowerWorld Corporation, and an author of Power System Analysis and Design. He was the recipient of the IEEE/PES Walter Fee Outstanding Young Engineer Award in 1993 and its Outstanding Power Engineering Educator Award in 2011; he also participated in the 2003 DOE/ NERC blackout investigation.

DANIEL BIENSTOCK is a professor in Columbia University’s Industrial Engineering and Operations Research Department, where he has been since 1989. He received his Ph.D. in operations research from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). His research focuses on optimization and high-performance computing, with a second focus on the use of computational mathematics in the analysis and control of power grids, especially the study of vulnerabilities and of cascading blackouts. Prior to joining Columbia University, Dr. Bienstock was in the combinatorics and optimization research group at Bellcore. He received the 2013 INFORMS fellow award, a Presidential Young Investigator award, and an IBM Faculty award, and he gave a plenary address at the 2005 Optimization Conference of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) and a semiplenary address at the 2006 International Symposium on Mathematical Programming.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Analytic Research Foundations for the Next-Generation Electric Grid. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21919.
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ANJAN BOSE, a member of the NAE, has over 45 years of experience in industry and academia as an engineer, educator, and administrator. He is now a Regents professor in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Washington State University and holds the endowed Distinguished Professorship in Power Engineering. From 1998 until 2005 he served as dean of that University’s College of Engineering and Architecture. From 1993 to 1998, he was the director of the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. A fellow of the IEEE, he was the recipient of the Outstanding Power Engineering Educator Award (1994), the Third Millennium Medal (2000), and the Herman Halperin Electric Transmission and Distribution Award (2006. He has been recognized as a distinguished alumnus of the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (2005), and the College of Engineering at Iowa State University (1993). In 2012 and 2013, Professor Bose served as a senior advisor at DOE, where he led the Grid Tech team, which identified DOE priorities in the context of the next-generation grid.

W. TERRY BOSTON, a member of the NAE, retired recently after 6 years as CEO of PJM Interconnection, the largest power grid in North America and the largest electricity market in the world. Mr. Boston is president of the Association of Edison Illuminating Companies and past president of GO 15, the association of the world’s largest power grid operators. He also served as a U.S. vice president of the International Council of Large Electric Systems and is a past chair of the North American Transmission Forum. He also was one of the eight industry experts selected to direct the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) investigation of the August 2003 Northeast/Midwest blackout. In 2011, Mr. Boston was honored with the Leadership in Power award from the IEEE Power and Energy Society. He also was chosen by Intelligent Utilities Magazine as one of the Top 11 Industry Movers and Shakers and led PJM to win Platts Global Energy awards in Industry Leadership 2010 and Excellence in Electricity in 2012. Mr. Boston received a B.S. in engineering from the Tennessee Technological University and an M.S. in engineering administration from the University of Tennessee.

JEFFERY DAGLE has worked at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, operated by Battelle for DOE, since 1989 and currently manages several projects in transmission reliability and security, including the North American SynchroPhasor Initiative (NASPI) and cybersecurity reviews for the DOE Smart Grid Investment Grants and Smart Grid Demonstration Projects. He is a senior member of the IEEE and a member of the International Society of Automation and the National Society of Professional Engineers. He received the 2001 Tri-City Engineer of the Year award from the Washington Society of Professional Engineers; led the data requests and management task for the U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force investigation of the August 14, 2003, blackout; supported the DOE Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Division with on-site assessments in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina in the fall of 2005; and is the recipient of two patents, a Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Award in 2007, and an R&D 100 Award in 2008 for grid friendly appliance controller technology. Mr. Dagle was a member of a National Infrastructure Advisory Council study group formed in 2010 to establish critical infrastructure resilience goals. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Washington State University in 1989 and 1994, respectively.

MARIJA ILIC is a professor at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) with joint appointments in electrical and computer engineering and engineering and public policy. She is director of the Electric Energy Systems Group at CMU and also serves as Honorary Chaired Professor for Control of Future Electricity Network Operations at the Delft University of Technology (the Netherlands). An IEEE fellow, Professor Ilic has over 30 years of experience in teaching and research in the area of electrical power system modeling and control. Her main interest is the systems aspects of operations, planning, and economics of the electric power industry. She has coauthored several books in her field of interest, most recently coediting Engineering IT-Enabled Sustainable Electricity Services: The Case of Low-Cost Green Azores Island.

CHRISTOPHER K.R.T. JONES is the Bill Guthridge Distinguished Professor of Mathematics at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill. He received his Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Wisconsin, Madison and, before joining UNC, was a professor of applied mathematics at Brown University for 13 years. The main thrust of Dr. Jones’s research is the use of dynamical systems as a tool for solving problems that originate in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Analytic Research Foundations for the Next-Generation Electric Grid. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21919.
×

applications—in particular, the use of dynamical systems methods in the study of nonlinear wave motion in neuroscience and optics, ocean dynamics, and, more recently, climate. He is director of the Mathematics and Climate Research Network, a broadly based NSF-funded effort to engage the mathematical sciences community in climate science and to define the problems that will form an emerging area of “climate mathematics.”

FRANK KELLY is a foreign member of NAE and a professor of the mathematics of systems at the University of Cambridge. His main research interests are in random processes, networks, and optimization, and he is especially interested in applications to the design and control of networks and to the understanding of self-regulation in large-scale systems. From 2003 to 2006 he served as chief scientific adviser to the U.K. Department for Transport. He was chair of the U.K. Council for the Mathematical Sciences from 2010 to 2013 and is a member of RAND Europe’s Council of Advisors as well. Professor Kelly is a fellow of the Royal Society.

YANNIS KEVREKIDIS is the Pomeroy and Betty Perry Smith Professor in Engineering at Princeton University. He received a B.S in chemical engineering from the National Technical University in Athens and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mathematics from the University of Minnesota. After a year at the Center for Nonlinear Studies in Los Alamos in 1985 and 1986, he moved to Princeton, New Jersey, where he teaches courses in chemical engineering and applied and computational mathematics. His research interests center on the dynamics of physical and chemical processes, types of instabilities, pattern formation, and the ways to study and understand such phenomena computationally. Recently he has also developed an interest in multiscale computations. Professor Kevrekidis has been a Packard fellow, a Presidential Young Investigator, a Guggenheim fellow, and a Ulam Scholar at Los Alamos. He has won the Colburn and Wilhelm awards of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, SIAM’s Crawford prize, and a Humboldt Prize.

RALPH D. MASIELLO, a member of the NAE, is an Industry Advisor at Quanta Technology. A recognized leader in next-generation electric grid systems, his focus in recent years has included energy storage applications and system integration, renewables integration in markets and operations, and development and integration of distributed energy resources. Dr. Masiello is a life fellow of the IEEE and has served as chairman of the IEEE section on power system engineering, chairman of the IEEE section on power industry computing applications, on the editorial board of the IEEE Proceedings, and on the advisory board for IEEE Spectrum magazine. He is the recipient of the 2009 IEEE Power Engineering Concordia award for Power System Engineering. Dr. Masiello received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from MIT in electrical engineering.

JUAN C. MEZA is dean of the School of Natural Sciences at the University of California, Merced. Before that Dr. Meza was for many years the head and senior scientist of the High Performance Computing Research Department at E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, where he oversaw work in computational science and mathematics, computer science and future technologies, scientific data management, visualization, numerical algorithms, and application development. His current research interests include nonlinear optimization, with an emphasis on methods for parallel computing. He has also worked on various scientific and engineering applications, including scalable methods for nanoscience, power grid reliability, molecular conformation problems, optimal design of chemical vapor deposition furnaces, and semiconductor device modeling. Before joining Lawrence Berkeley, Dr. Meza was a distinguished member of the technical staff at Sandia National Laboratories and served as manager of the Computational Sciences and Mathematics Research department. Dr. Meza has been named by Hispanic Business Magazine as one of the Top 100 Influentials in the area of science. A fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), Dean Meza was the 2008 recipient of the Blackwell-Tapia Prize and the SACNAS Distinguished Scientist Award. He was also a member of the team that won the Association for Computing Machinery’s (ACM) 2008 Gordon Bell Award for Algorithm Innovation. Dr. Meza has served on numerous external committees, including DOE’s Advanced Scientific Computing Research Advisory Committee, NSF’s Mathematical and Physical Sciences Advisory Committee and its Advisory Committee for Cyberinfrastructure, and the SIAM Board of Trustees.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Analytic Research Foundations for the Next-Generation Electric Grid. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21919.
×

CYNTHIA RUDIN is an associate professor of statistics at MIT and directs the Prediction Analysis Lab. Before joining MIT, Dr. Rudin held positions at the Center for Computational Learning Systems at Columbia University and at New York University (NYU). She holds an undergraduate degree from the University at Buffalo, where she received the College of Arts and Sciences Outstanding Senior Award in Sciences and Mathematics. She received a Ph.D. in applied and computational mathematics from Princeton University. She is the recipient of the 2013 INFORMS Innovative Applications in Analytics Award, an NSF CAREER award, and was named as one of the “Top 40 Under 40” by Poets and Quants in 2015.

ROBERT J. THOMAS is professor emeritus of electrical and computer engineering at Cornell University, where he began teaching in 1973. The author of over 100 technical papers and two book chapters, Professor Thomas has been a member of the Energy Policy Committee of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) since 1991 and was that committee’s chair in 1997 and 1998. He has also been a member of the IEEE Technology Policy Council, has served as the IEEE-USA vice president for technology policy, and has been a member of several university, government, and industry advisory boards. He has published in the areas of transient control and voltage collapse problems as well as on the technical, economic, and institutional impacts of restructuring. He is the founding director of the 13-university member, National Science Foundation (NSF)-sponsored Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC). He was a member of the DOE Secretary’s Power Outage Study Team and is a founding member of the Coalition for Electric Reliability Solutions (CERTS). Professor Thomas was on assignment to the DOE in 2003 as a senior advisor to the director of the Office of Electric Transmission and Distribution and a member of the DOE team investigating the August 14, 2003, blackout, and he has also spent time with the DOE Office of Electric Energy Systems and at the NSF as the first program director for the Power Systems Program. He contributed to the 2007 National Interest Electric Transmission Corridor study and was an advisor to three DOE assistant secretaries for electricity delivery and energy reliability from 2002 to 2011. He served as one of 30 inaugural members of the DOE Secretary’s Electricity Advisory Committee from 2008 until 2010. Professor Thomas has received five teaching awards and the IEEE Centennial and Millennium medals, and is an IEEE life fellow.

MARGARET H. WRIGHT, a member of both the National Academy of Sciences and the NAE, is Silver Professor of Computer Science and Mathematics in the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at NYU. She received B.S. (mathematics), M.S., and Ph.D. (computer science) degrees from Stanford University. Her research interests include optimization, scientific computing, and real-world applications. Before joining NYU, she worked at Bell Laboratories (Lucent Technologies). Professor Wright has served as president of SIAM and on numerous advisory committees for the DOE and several mathematical sciences institutes.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Analytic Research Foundations for the Next-Generation Electric Grid. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21919.
×
Page 141
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Analytic Research Foundations for the Next-Generation Electric Grid. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21919.
×
Page 142
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Analytic Research Foundations for the Next-Generation Electric Grid. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21919.
×
Page 143
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Analytic Research Foundations for the Next-Generation Electric Grid. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21919.
×
Page 144
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Electricity is the lifeblood of modern society, and for the vast majority of people that electricity is obtained from large, interconnected power grids. However, the grid that was developed in the 20th century, and the incremental improvements made since then, including its underlying analytic foundations, is no longer adequate to completely meet the needs of the 21st century. The next-generation electric grid must be more flexible and resilient. While fossil fuels will have their place for decades to come, the grid of the future will need to accommodate a wider mix of more intermittent generating sources such as wind and distributed solar photovoltaics.

Achieving this grid of the future will require effort on several fronts. There is a need for continued shorter-term engineering research and development, building on the existing analytic foundations for the grid. But there is also a need for more fundamental research to expand these analytic foundations. Analytic Research Foundations for the Next-Generation Electric Grid provide guidance on the longer-term critical areas for research in mathematical and computational sciences that is needed for the next-generation grid. It offers recommendations that are designed to help direct future research as the grid evolves and to give the nation’s research and development infrastructure the tools it needs to effectively develop, test, and use this research.

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