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Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Fatigue, Long-Term Health, and Highway Safety: Research Needs (2016)

Chapter: Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Fatigue, Long-Term Health, and Highway Safety: Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21921.
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Appendix

Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

MATTHEW RIZZO (Cochair) is the Francis and Edgar Reynolds chair and professor of the Department of Neurological Sciences at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and codirector of the Nebraska Neuroscience Alliance. Previously, he was a senior faculty member in the Department of Neurology and the Division of Behavioral Neurology and Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Iowa where he was also director of the Visual Functional Laboratory, Simulator for Research in Ergonomics and Safety, Automobile for Research in Ergonomics and Safety, and Nissan-Iowa Instrumented Vehicles for Ergonomics and Neuroscience. His long-term research and work has focused on the association between human factors and the performance of operators of motor vehicles. He is a fellow of the American Neurological Association and the American Academy of Neurology. He has been honored with the Inaugural Medical Review Board Service Award of the U.S. Department of Transportation. He has an A.B. from Columbia University and an M.D. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

HAL S. STERN (Cochair) is the Ted and Janice Smith Family Foundation dean and professor of statistics in the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Irvine. Previously, he held faculty positions and served as director of undergraduate studies in the department of statistics at Harvard University. He also previously held the Laurence H. Baker chair in biological sciences and served as director of graduate studies at Iowa State University. His primary areas of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Fatigue, Long-Term Health, and Highway Safety: Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21921.
×

research are Bayesian methods, model diagnostics, and statistical applications to the biological and social sciences. He is a fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and the American Statistical Association. He has a B.S. in mathematics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University.

DANIEL BLOWER is an associate research scientist with the Center for the Management of Information for Safe and Sustainable Transportation at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute. His primary area of research is traffic crash causation, focusing primarily on medium and heavy trucks, and he has also directed projects on traffic safety issues related to light vehicles. His past projects have included investigating the crash experience of younger truck drivers, developing an event tree for heavy truck accidents, and developing statistical models relating vehicle configuration and operating environment to the probability of accident involvement. He is chair of the Michigan Truck Safety Commission, and he previously served on the Technical Advisory Group for American Transportation Research Institute on Truck Drivers Hours of Service study; the Technical Advisory Committee on National Motor Vehicle Crash Causation Study for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration; and the Large Truck Crash Causation Study committee for the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. He has a B.A. and a Ph.D. in history from the University of Michigan.

MICHAEL L. COHEN (Costudy Director) is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics. He has led or served as contributing staff on a wide range of studies on the U.S. census and the modeling and reliability of defense systems. He also serves as a consultant on statistical analysis for other divisions in the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Previously, he was a mathematical statistician at the Energy Information Administration and held positions at the School of Public Affairs at the University of Maryland and at Princeton University. His general area of interest is the use of statistics in public policy, with particular focus in census undercount, model validation, and robust estimation. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He has a B.S. in mathematics from the University of Michigan and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University.

CHARLES A. CZEISLER is the Baldino professor of sleep medicine at Harvard Medical School. His research interests include basic and applied research on the physiology of human circadian rhythm and its relationship to the sleep-wake cycle, including the application of sleep science

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Fatigue, Long-Term Health, and Highway Safety: Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21921.
×

and sleep medicine to policy on occupational medicine and health policy, particularly as it relates to extended duration work shifts and long work weeks. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and the American Clinical and Climatological Association, a fellow of the Clinical Sleep Society, the American Sleep Disorders Association, the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research, and the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and an honorary fellow of the Royal College of Physicians. He is a recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award of the National Sleep Foundation, the Lord Adrian Gold Medal from the Royal Society of Medicine, and the distinguished scientist award from the Sleep Research Society. He has an M.D. from the Stanford University School of Medicine and a Ph.D. in neuro- and biobehavioral sciences from Stanford University.

DAVID F. DINGES is a professor and vice chair in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where he also serves as chief of the Division of Sleep and Chronobiology and director of the Unit for Experimental Psychiatry. He also heads the Neurobehavioral and Psychosocial Factors Team for the National Space Biomedical Research Institute. His research has focused on laboratory and field studies of the physiological, neurobehavioral, and fatiguing effects of inadequate sleep in humans; the causes and consequences for accidents and catastrophic events associated with human error; and the behaviors, countermeasures and technologies that can prevent or mitigate the effects of fatigue on human safety. He is a fellow of the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research, the American Physiological Society, the American Psychological Association, and the Association for Psychological Science, an overseas fellow of the International Association of Traffic and Safety Societies, and an elected member of the International Academy of Astronautics. He is a recipient of the Decade of Behavior Research Award from the American Psychological Association and the Distinguished Public Service Medal from the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration. He has an A.B. from Benedictine College and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in physiological psychology from Saint Louis University.

JOEL B. GREENHOUSE is a professor in the department of statistics at Carnegie Mellon University and an adjunct professor of psychiatry and adjunct professor of epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh. Previously, he served as associate dean for academic affairs and as assistant professor in the Department of Statistics at Carnegie Mellon University. His research focuses on biostatistical applications and meta-analysis. He is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the International Statistical Institute. He is a recipient of the Statistician of the Year Award from

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Fatigue, Long-Term Health, and Highway Safety: Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21921.
×

the Pittsburgh Chapter of the American Statistical Association. He has a B.S. in mathematics from the University of Maryland and an A.M. in statistics and an M.P.H. and a Ph.D. in biostatistics from the University of Michigan.

FENG GUO is an associate professor in the Department of Statistics at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, where he is affiliated with the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute. His primary areas of research are transportation statistics, Bayesian hierarchical models, traffic safety models, spatial statistics, and statistical epidemiology. His specific area of interest is driver behavior and analysis of data from naturalistic driving studies. He is a member of the Committee on Statistical Methods and Committee on Safety, Data, Analysis, and Evaluation of the Transportation Research Board of the National Academies. He has a B.S. in highway and traffic engineering and an M.S. in transportation economics and management from Tongju University in Shanghai, China, and Ph.D. degrees in transportation engineering and statistics from the University of Connecticut.

RICHARD J. HANOWSKI is director of the Center for Truck and Bus Safety and senior research scientist for the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute. His research focuses on transportation human factors involving both heavy and light vehicles, laboratory and field testing, simulation, advanced system development and testing, naturalistic driving, and human performance evaluation. His area of expertise is fatigue and distracted driving, particularly pertaining to commercial vehicle drivers. He is a recipient of the Paul S. Richards Endowed Distinguished Visiting Lectureship in Occupational Health, the 2011 SAE International L. Ray Buckendale Lecture Award, and was the recipient of HFES’s Best Ergonomics in Design Article Award. He has a B.A. in psychology from the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon, Canada, an M.S. in psychology from the University of Idaho, and a Ph.D. in industrial and systems engineering (human factors engineering) from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

NATALIE P. HARTENBAUM is president and chief medical officer of OccuMedix, Inc., an occupational medicine consulting firm that provides occupational health and safety consulting services, including expert medical review and litigation support on issues of the Americans with Disabilities Act and fitness for duty. She also serves on both the clinical and teaching faculty of the University of Pennsylvania and as the medical director for several companies in the Philadelphia area. Previously, she served as medical director of the Consolidated Railroad Corporation,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Fatigue, Long-Term Health, and Highway Safety: Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21921.
×

associate medical director for CentraMed Occupational Health Specialists, and medical director at the Industrial Health Care Center. She is past president of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, a member of the Board of Trustees of the American Board of Preventive Medicine, and president of the Philadelphia Occupational and Environmental Medicine Society. She is a recipient of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine’s President’s Award. She has a B.A. in biology from Temple University, an M.D. from the Temple University School of Medicine, and an M.P.H. in occupational medicine from the Medical College of Wisconsin.

GERALD P. KRUEGER is president of Krueger Ergonomics Consultants in Alexandria, Virginia. His primary research interests are human factors, human engineering, ergonomics, operator fatigue, and employee health, wellness, and fitness. His research expertise includes the human performance implications of equipment operator fatigue, sleep deprivation, sustained operations, and formulating worker health and wellness programs. Previously, he worked as principal scientist/ergonomist and as director of human factors, ergonomics, and medical research programs for the Wexford Group. He also held positions at UTEK Corporation, Star Mountain, Inc., and the Biomechanics Corporation of America. He spent 25 years doing occupational medicine research in the U.S. Army, ultimately achieving the position of colonel, with the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine. He served at the U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory; the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research; the Headquarters of the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command; and as medical R&D command liaison officer at the U.S. Army Human Engineering Laboratory. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, the Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors, the Washington Academy of Sciences, and he is an associate fellow of the Aerospace Medical Association. He has been awarded the Order of Military Medical Merit for Career Contributions to the U.S. Army Medical Department and a presidential citation for military service as a psychologist in the Vietnam conflict. In 2015 the American Psychological Association awarded him the Flannagan Award for Lifetime Achievement in Military Psychology. He served over 20 years as book review editor for Ergonomics in Design; is an associate editor for Military Psychology; served as section editor for Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine; and he was a member of the editorial board of the Society for Human Performance in Extreme Environments. He has a B.A. in psychology from the University of Dayton and an M.A. in engineering psychology and Ph.D. in experimental and engineering psychology from the Johns Hopkins University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Fatigue, Long-Term Health, and Highway Safety: Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21921.
×

MELISSA M. MALLIS is president and chief scientist of M3Alertness Management, chief scientific advisor for Alertness Solutions, and senior science advisor for DB&A, a management consulting firm. She is also a fellow at George Mason University in the Center for Infrastructure Protection and Homeland Security. Previously, she served as chief scientist for operational and fatigue research at the Institutes for Behavioral Resources and as director of scientific affairs at Alertness Solutions. Her major areas of interest are the development of innovative, practical, and effective strategies to enhance safety, performance, and alertness in various 24/7 operational environments. She has received several NASA superior performance awards and incentive awards from the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration. She has also received the Arnold D. Tuttle award from the Aerospace Medical Association and is a three-time awardee of the William E. Collins award from the Aerospace Human Factors Association. She has a B.S. in physics from Villanova University and a Ph.D. in biomedical science from Drexel University.

RICHARD PAIN (Consultant) recently retired from the Transportation Research Board, where he was the transportation safety coordinator in the board’s Technical Activities Division. He served as staff to a wide range of committees, including studies of truck and bus safety, statistics in transportation, visualization in transportation, and future truck and bus safety research opportunities, as well as an international conference on research on the health and wellness of commercial truck and bus drivers. Prior to his work for the Transportation Research Board, his work focused on human factors and safety research and evaluation in the transportation, nuclear, civil, and military areas, conducting numerous laboratory, simulation, and fully operational experiments; training, development, conduct, and evaluation studies; and human engineering reviews. He has a B.A. in psychology from Hofstra University and an M.A. in clinical psychology and a Ph.D. in applied experimental psychology from Michigan State University.

JOHN R. PEARSON is program director of the Council of Deputy Ministers Responsible for Transportation and Highway Safety in Ottawa, Ontario, where he is responsible for developing, managing, and conducting research on policy development programs. He previously served as a consultant to the Council of Deputy Ministers; executive director of the Canadian Trucking Research Institute; director of technical programs for the Transportation Association of Canada; director of research for the Western Highway Institute; and project manager for the Vehicle Weights and Dimensions Study at the Canroad Transportation Research Corporation. His research interests include safety using naturalistic driving tech-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Fatigue, Long-Term Health, and Highway Safety: Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21921.
×

niques, with expertise in highway safety, especially weights and dimensions policies. He has twice received chairman’s award of the Roads and Transportation Association of Canada. He has a bachelor of engineering degree from Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario.

ESHA SINHA (Costudy Director) is an associate program officer for the Committee on National Statistics. She has served as a staff officer for a wide range of projects, including studies on the measurement of productivity in higher education, future content and methods for R&D resources, and, currently, on compliance, safety, and accountability for federal motor carriers. Previously, she worked for the Indian Institute of Management in Ahmedabad. At the State University of New York at Binghamton, she worked extensively on student records on such topics as whether advanced placement or SAT scores are better predictors of college success and performance of transfer students. She has an M.A. degree in economics from GIPE, India, and a Ph.D. in economics from SUNY Binghamton.

DYLAN SMALL is a professor in the Department of Statistics at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and an associate scholar in the university’s Biostatistics Unit of the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics in the School of Medicine. His areas of research include causal inference, the design and analysis of observational studies, and applications of statistics to public health, medicine, and public policy. He is the founding editor of the journal Observational Studies. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and a senior fellow at the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics. He has an A.B. in mathematics from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University.

ELIZABETH A. STUART is a professor in the Department of Mental Health, the Department of Biostatistics, and the Department of Health Policy and Management in the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Previously, she was a researcher at Mathematica Policy Research. Her primary areas of research include statistical methodology for mental health research, particularly relating to causal inference and missing data. She also conducts research in the areas of education, prevention, and intervention using techniques such as multilevel modeling, matching, and propensity scores. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. She has an A.B. in mathematics and chemistry from Smith College and an A.M. and a Ph.D. in statistics from Harvard University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Fatigue, Long-Term Health, and Highway Safety: Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21921.
×

DAVID H. WEGMAN is professor emeritus and founding chair of the Department of Work Environment of the School of Health and Environment at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell. He is also an adjunct professor at the Harvard School of Public Health and vice president of the Alpha Foundation for the Improvement of Mine Safety and Health. His epidemiologic research includes the study of acute and chronic occupational respiratory disease, cancer risk, and musculoskeletal disorders, and he also studies the subjective outcomes as early indicators of health effects, surveillance of occupational conditions and risks, and occupational health policy. He chaired the Mine Safety and Health Administration Advisory Committee on the Elimination of Pneumoconiosis Among Coal Mine Workers for the U.S. Department of Labor, the International Evaluation Group for an analysis of Occupational Health Research in Sweden, and the United Auto Workers/General Motors Occupational Health Advisory Board. He is a fellow of the American College of Epidemiology, and he is a recipient of the Alice Hamilton Lifetime Achievement Award in the Occupational Health and Safety Section from the American Public Health Association. He has also served as chair of He has a B.A. in history from Swarthmore College and an M.Sc. in occupational health and an M.D. from Harvard University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Fatigue, Long-Term Health, and Highway Safety: Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21921.
×
Page 245
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Fatigue, Long-Term Health, and Highway Safety: Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21921.
×
Page 246
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Fatigue, Long-Term Health, and Highway Safety: Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21921.
×
Page 247
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Fatigue, Long-Term Health, and Highway Safety: Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21921.
×
Page 248
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Fatigue, Long-Term Health, and Highway Safety: Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21921.
×
Page 249
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Fatigue, Long-Term Health, and Highway Safety: Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21921.
×
Page 250
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Fatigue, Long-Term Health, and Highway Safety: Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21921.
×
Page 251
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Fatigue, Long-Term Health, and Highway Safety: Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21921.
×
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There are approximately 4,000 fatalities in crashes involving trucks and buses in the United States each year. Though estimates are wide-ranging, possibly 10 to 20 percent of these crashes might have involved fatigued drivers. The stresses associated with their particular jobs (irregular schedules, etc.) and the lifestyle that many truck and bus drivers lead, puts them at substantial risk for insufficient sleep and for developing short- and long-term health problems.

Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Fatigue, Long-Term Health and Highway Safety assesses the state of knowledge about the relationship of such factors as hours of driving, hours on duty, and periods of rest to the fatigue experienced by truck and bus drivers while driving and the implications for the safe operation of their vehicles. This report evaluates the relationship of these factors to drivers’ health over the longer term, and identifies improvements in data and research methods that can lead to better understanding in both areas.

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