National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Appendix C: Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education Sponsors
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×

Appendix D

Speaker Biographies

David Brown, M.D., is founding chief of family and community medicine and vice chair in the Department of Medicine, Family Medicine and Community Health at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine and Florida International University (FIU). He has extensive experience with developing innovative educational, outreach, and service-learning programs. At FIU, he has had a leading role in the development of the signature award winning NeighborhoodHELP interprofessional outreach program and related medical school curricula. As founding Family Medicine Residency program director, he developed, launched, and received accreditation for the first residency program initiated by the Wertheim College of Medicine. He is a member of the FIU team for the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Core Entrustable Activities for Entering Residency Pilot, with a focus on Interprofessional Collaboration and Entrustment. He was co-founder of the Historic Overtown Public Health Empowerment (HOPE) Collaborative and co-editor of the Overtown Cookbook. His research interests include urban health, intercultural competencies, interprofessional collaboration, chronic disease prevention and management, integration of behavioral health, household-centered care, and health professions education. His research bricolage involves phenomenological, ethnographic, epidemiologic educational, mixed, and participatory methods. His work has been published in Social Science and Medicine, American Journal of Public Health, CES4Health.info, MedEdPORTAL, Medical Teacher, The Qualitative Report, American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and the Southern Medical Journal.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×

Joanna M. Cain, M.D., FACOG, grew up in the medically underserved Yakima Indian Reservation, and saw firsthand how difficult it is to meet the needs of rural and underserved women. That experience led to the study of medicine after graduating from the University of Washington. She received her M.D. from Creighton University, her residency in obstetrics and gynecology (Ob/Gyn) at the University of Washington and went on to become the first woman accepted for Fellowship in Gynecologic Oncology at Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. She went on to be the first woman president of the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics as well as president of the Council of University Chairs for Ob/Gyn. A recognized national leader in women’s health nationally and internationally, she continues to focus her research on prevention strategies for gynecologic cancers, medical ethics and curricular development for women’s health. She was appointed the first woman and first American Chair of the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Ethics Committee which she led for a decade. She has served as professor and chair, as well as the Julie Neupert Stott Director of the Center for Women’s Health at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) where she led the campaign to fund and build an innovative, multidisciplinary Center for Women’s Health which is still setting the standard for national development of women’s health. She presently serves as professor and vice chair for faculty development at the University of Massachusetts as well as special consultant in women’s health Safety and Quality for the American College of Ob/Gyn and Special Rapporteur for Women’s Health at FIGO. In these positions, she is developing the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) Registry Alliance and registries in women’s health, the outpatient certification and education programs for safety and quality in women’s health and chairing the FIGO initiatives in global cervical cancer control. She is chairing the World Health Organization (WHO) committee working on the cervical cancer control guidance globally.

Brigit M. Carter, M.S.N., Ph.D., joined the Duke University School of Nursing (DUSON) in 2010 and currently serves as the Accelerated B.S.N. (ABSN) Program chair and teaches pediatrics in the undergraduate curriculum. She earned her B.S.N. at North Carolina Central University (NCCU) in 1998, a master’s of science in nursing education from University of North Carolina (UNC) at Greensboro in 2002, and a Ph.D. in nursing from UNC at Chapel Hill in 2009. She continues her clinical practice as a staff nurse in the Duke University Medical Center Intensive Care Nursery, where she has 17 years’ experience. She is the project director of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Nursing Workforce Diversity grant at DUSON, “The Academy for Academic and Social Enrichment and Leadership Development for Health Equity (The Health Equity Academy),” and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×

is also the academic coordinator for this program. Dr. Carter’s experience in nursing education before joining the DUSON faculty included coordinating staff education and development in the Intensive Care Nursery, and teaching positions at both Duke (clinical instructor in labor and delivery for ABSN students) and UNC at Chapel Hill (Teaching Fellow in the UNC School of Nursing). Dr. Carter has 26 years of U.S. Navy service (including 9 on active duty) and is currently serving in the rank of Commander in the U.S. Navy Reserves in the Operational Health Support Unit. She is assigned to Naval Medical Center Portsmouth in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

Elizabeth Doerr, M.A., is the associate director of SOURCE (Student Outreach Resource Center), the community service and service-learning center serving the Johns Hopkins University’s (JHU’s) Schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health. Previously, she was the coordinator for Leadership & Community Service-Learning, Immersion Experiences at the University of Maryland (UMD), College Park. Ms. Doerr has lived, worked, and traveled extensively in Latin America and Africa. Ms. Doerr’s work at SOURCE focuses primarily on training faculty in service-learning pedagogy and institutionalizing service-learning and community engagement within the JHU health professional schools. Ms. Doerr is originally from Washington State and earned her M.A. in international education policy from UMD and her B.A. in rhetoric/media studies and Spanish at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon.

Kira Fortune, Ph.D., M.I.H., M.A., has worked more than 15 years in Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America in positions related to public health, gender, and social determinants of health. Dr. Fortune spent 4 years working in the Department of Global Advocacy at The International Planned Parenthood Federation in London and then 3 years with the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, where she was responsible for the program on Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus). Dr. Fortune has extensive experience working with and within nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), academia, and in intergovernmental organizations focusing on gender mainstreaming, social determinants of health, Health-in-All-Policies, and general public health issues. Prior to moving to Washington, DC, she coordinated The International Health Research Network in Denmark with the objective of translating research evidence into policy. In 2008 she joined the Pan American Health Organization, the regional office of the United Nation’s WHO, where she is responsible for the Social Determinants of Health and Health in All Policies. Dr. Fortune holds a master’s degree in anthropology, development, and gender as well as a doctorate in Sociology on The Challenge of Gender Mainstreaming for a Contemporary NGO

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×

from University of London, England. She also holds a master’s degree in international public health from Copenhagen University, Denmark.

Pedro J. Greer, Jr., M.D., is professor of medicine at FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine (HWCOM) in Miami, Florida, the chair of the Department of Medicine, Family Medicine and Community Health, associate dean for Community Engagement. Throughout his career, Dr. Greer has been an advocate for health equity by engaging communities to create effective health and social policies and accessible health care systems. His advocacy began during medical training, when he established Camillus Health Concern, Saint John Bosco, health centers for the homeless, underserved, and undocumented populations in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Dr. Greer was recently honored with the 2014 National Jefferson Award in the category of Greatest Public Service Benefiting the Disadvantaged; the award was founded in 1972 by Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Senator Taft, Jr., and Sam Beard and the award is often referred to as the Nobel Prize for public service. Dr. Greer was also recognized with the 2013 Great Floridian Award, in 2009 he was awarded with the Presidential Medal of Freedom honoree, receiving America’s highest civilian award, the Presidential Service Award in 1997, and in 1993 was named a MacArthur Fellow (“Genius Grant”). He has also received a Papal Medal and has been Knighted as a Knight of Malta and Saint Gregory the Great. He authored Waking Up in America, a book about his experiences, from providing care to homeless persons under bridges in Miami, Florida, to advising U.S. presidents on health care, including Presidents Bush Sr. and Clinton. As founding chair of the Department of Humanities, Health, and Society at HWCOM, Dr. Greer spearheaded a unique medical education curriculum to prepare physicians and other health professionals to address the social determinants that affect health access and outcomes, while simultaneously caring for individuals and communities through household visits and engagement. Taking health care to a household centered model. He currently serves in various capacities for a multitude of national, state, and local organizations. He is a Trustee at the RAND Corporation (America’s oldest and largest think tank) and is the current Chair of the Pardee RAND Graduate School Board of Governors, the largest Ph.D.-granting institution for policy analysis. Additionally, Dr. Greer served as chair for the Hispanic Heritage Awards Foundation from 2002 to 2012. He is a member of Alpha Omega Alpha National Medical Honor Society and a fellow in the American College of Physicians and the American College of Gastroenterology. Dr. Greer completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Florida and medical studies at La Universidad Catolica Madre y Maestra in the Dominican Republic. He trained in internal medicine and served as chief resident at the University of Miami Miller School Of Medicine in Miami, Florida. Dr. Greer com-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×

pleted two post-doctoral fellowships—one in hepatology and the second in gastroenterology. He is board certified in medicine and gastroenterology.

Lillian Holloway, M.D., grew up in West Philadelphia. She worked as a certified nursing assistant before deciding to go to medical school. She graduated from the Latin American School of Medicine (ELAM), Havana, Cuba, in 2009. She is currently a resident in Family Practice and an M.P.H. candidate at University of Illinois Hospitals in Chicago.

Onelia Lage, M.D., has 25 years of academic medical experience and is board certified in Adolescent Medicine/Pediatrics. In her current position at FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, she is an associate professor in the Division of Family Medicine and vice chair for education in the Department of Medicine, Family Medicine and Community Health; Assistant Strand Leader for Medicine and Society; director of Pediatric and Adolescent Health for Green Family Foundation NeighborhoodHELP; and associate director of the community engaged physician course. Dr. Lage has served on the Florida Board of Medicine since 2005 and was elected by her peers to serve as chair in 2010. She was the first Hispanic woman to serve in this position. She has been active in leadership with the National Hispanic Medical Association. Her passion lies in helping young people achieve their ultimate potential and preparing the next generation of physicians with a strong emphasis on compassionate care, humility, and ethical and professional character.

Pierre M. LaRamée, M.A., Ph.D., executive director of Medical Education Cooperation with Cuba (MEDICC), has more than 30 years’ experience in NGO programming and administration with overlapping expertise in academic research, policy analysis/advocacy, strategic communications/publishing, and resource development. In his nonprofit career, Dr. LaRamée has also developed strong geographical expertise on Latin American and Caribbean political and social issues. Prior to joining MEDICC, he co-founded Re:Generation Consulting, building on his career at International Planned Parenthood Federation-Western Hemisphere Region, where he oversaw communications, media, and fundraising activities while directing emerging cutting-edge advocacy programs in Latin America and the Caribbean. He came to International Planned Parenthood Federation/Western Hemisphere Region (IPPF/WHR) in 2004 from the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund, a Latino civil rights organization, where he served as director of development and executive vice president. He previously served as executive director of the North American Congress on Latin America, a research and publishing organization specializing in U.S.-Latin American Relations, and as assistant professor of sociology and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×

Latin American studies at St. Lawrence University. He is fluent in French and Spanish and has authored and co-authored numerous articles, book chapters, and reviews. Dr. LaRamée holds a master’s in political science from McGill University and a Ph.D. in the sociology of international development from Cornell University.

Angelo McClain, Ph.D., LICSW, is the chief executive officer of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) and president of the National Association of Social Workers Foundation. NASW is the largest membership organization of professional social workers in America with 140,000 members. NASW promotes the profession of social work and social workers and advocates for sound social policies that improve well-being for individuals, families, and communities. Dr. McClain previously served as Commissioner for the Massachusetts Department of Children and Families for 6 years, a position appointed by Governor Deval Patrick. While there, he oversaw a budget of $850 million and a workforce of 3,500 employees to address reports of abuse and neglect for the state’s most vulnerable children, partnering with families to help them better nurture and protect their children.

Susan Scrimshaw, Ph.D., M.A., is currently the president of The Sage Colleges in Troy, New York. Prior to her appointment as president of The Sage Colleges, Dr. Scrimshaw was president of Simmons College in Boston, Massachusetts. She was dean of the School of Public Health, and professor of community health sciences and of anthropology at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) from 1994 through June 2006. Prior to becoming dean at UIC in 1994, she was associate dean of public health and professor of public health and anthropology at the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Scrimshaw is a graduate of Barnard College and obtained her M.A. and Ph.D. in anthropology from Columbia University. Her research includes community participatory research methods, addressing health disparities, improving pregnancy outcomes, violence prevention, health literacy, and culturally appropriate delivery of health care. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine, where she has been elected a member of the governing council and serves on the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP), a joint unit of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the National Academy of Medicine. She is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Anthropological Association, and the Institute of Medicine of Chicago. While in Chicago, Dr. Scrimshaw was an appointed member of the Chicago Board of Health and Illinois State Board of Health. She chaired the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on Communication for Behavior Change in the 21st Century: Improving the Health of Diverse Populations, and served as a

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×

member of the IOM Committee on Health Literacy. She is a past president of the board of directors of the U.S.-Mexico Foundation for Science, former chair of the Association of Schools of Public Health, and past president of the Society for Medical Anthropology. Her honors and awards include the Margaret Mead Award, a Hero of Public Health gold medal awarded by President Vicente Fox of Mexico, the UIC Mentor of the Year Award in 2002, and the Chicago Community Clinic Visionary Award in 2005.

Sara Willems, M.A., Ph.D., received a master’s in health promotion (1999) and a Ph.D. in medical sciences (2005) from Ghent University (Belgium). Since 2005 she coordinates the research group “Inequity in health and primary health care.” In 2011 she was appointed as the first professor in health equity at Ghent University. Her research activities focus on the social gradient in medical health care use, the accessibility of the Belgian health care system, the role of primary health care in tackling health inequity, and the link between social capital and health (inequity). She developed a special interest in the use of qualitative research methods. Dr. Willems is the author of chapters in several books and wrote articles in several peer-reviewed journals. She is (co-)author of several research reports for the federal and local authorities. She is involved in the medical curriculum and in the master program on health promotion at Ghent University where she teaches on social inequity, and health and society. She is also involved in the design and implementation of several community health projects in Ghent and is the chief executive officer of a community health center in one of the deprived areas in Ghent.

Shanita D. Williams, Ph.D., M.P.H., APRN, is chief of the Nursing Education and Practice Branch in the Division of Nursing and Public Health, Bureau of Health Workforce at HRSA. As branch chief, Dr. Williams leads the Division of Nursing and Public Health’s investments in two key areas—the Nursing Workforce Diversity (NWD) Program, which supports projects that incorporate the social determinants into evidence-based strategies to increase nursing workforce diversity, and the Nurse Education, Practice, Quality and Retention (NEPQR) Program, which supports interprofessional collaborative practice models that include diverse interprofessional teams composed of nurses and other health professionals. Dr. Williams is a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education and a member of the National Advisory Committee for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Future of Nursing Scholars Program. She is a family nurse practitioner and social epidemiologist; received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in nursing from the University of South Carolina in Columbia; her Ph.D. in nursing from Georgia State University in Atlanta; and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×

an M.P.H. degree from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. Williams completed postdoctoral training as a Cancer Prevention Fellow at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bethesda, Maryland, in the Division of Cancer Control and Populations Sciences, Surveillance Research Program. Dr. Williams has received an NCI Fellow’s Merit Award and Minority Scholar Awards for Cancer Research from the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). Dr. Williams is also a National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) Research Scholar.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×
Page 139
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×
Page 140
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×
Page 141
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×
Page 142
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×
Page 143
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×
Page 144
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×
Page 145
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×
Page 146
Next: Appendix E: Committee Member Biographies »
A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $49.00 Buy Ebook | $39.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

The World Health Organization defines the social determinants of health as “the conditions in which people are born, grow, work, live, and age, and the wider set of forces and systems shaping the conditions of daily life.” These forces and systems include economic policies, development agendas, cultural and social norms, social policies, and political systems. In an era of pronounced human migration, changing demographics, and growing financial gaps between rich and poor, a fundamental understanding of how the conditions and circumstances in which individuals and populations exist affect mental and physical health is imperative. Educating health professionals about the social determinants of health generates awareness among those professionals about the potential root causes of ill health and the importance of addressing them in and with communities, contributing to more effective strategies for improving health and health care for underserved individuals, communities, and populations.

Recently, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop to develop a high-level framework for such health professional education. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health also puts forth a conceptual model for the framework’s use with the goal of helping stakeholder groups envision ways in which organizations, education, and communities can come together to address health inequalities.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!