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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee Member Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
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Appendix E

Committee Member Biographies

Sandra D. Lane, Ph.D., M.P.H. (Chair), Laura J. and L. Douglas Meredith Professor of teaching excellence, is a professor of public health and anthropology at Syracuse University and a research professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Upstate Medical University. She received her Ph.D. in medical anthropology from the joint program at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), and the University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley), and an M.P.H. in epidemiology from UC Berkeley. Her research focuses on the impact of racial, ethnic, and gender disadvantage on maternal, child, and family health in urban areas of the United States and the Middle East. In addition to the Meredith award, she received the Carl F. Wittke Award for Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching and the John S. Diekhoff Award for Distinguished Graduate Teaching, both at Case Western Reserve University. Dr. Lane has developed a model that links the community-participatory analysis of public policy with pedagogy, called CARE (Community Action Research and Education). Her CARE projects include food deserts in Syracuse, lead poisoning in rental property, health of the uninsured, and her current project on neighborhood trauma and gun violence. Her CARE publications since joining the Syracuse University faculty have included as co-authors 5 community members, 10 graduate students, and 11 undergrads. Prior to joining Syracuse University, Dr. Lane was the founding director of Syracuse Healthy Start, an infant mortality prevention program, in Syracuse, New York. With Dr. Richard Aubry she developed an intervention for screening and treating pregnant women for bacterial vaginosis that was associated with a 50 percent reduction in premature births in Syracuse (“Evaluation of Syracuse Healthy Start’s

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee Member Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×

program for abnormal flora screening, treatment, and rescreening among pregnant women, Syracuse, New York, 2000-2002,” (2011) Maternal and Child Health Journal, 15(7):1020-1028.) She led a community-wide health literacy initiative that resulted in a 75 percent reduction of post neonatal deaths among women who had not graduated from high school. (“Parental Literacy and Infant Health: An Evidence-Based Healthy Start Intervention,” (2006) Health Promotion Practice, 7(1):95-102.) She secured grant funding to support the development of the Onondaga County Child Fatality Review Team and served as a member from 1997-2004. She has also been a consultant to WHO for operational research on tuberculosis, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and UNICEF for Rapid Assessment Procedures, and the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) for qualitative methods in hospital evaluation. From 1988-1992, she was the Child Survival, Reproductive Health and Population Program Officer, in the Ford Foundation’s Cairo, Egypt, field office, with grant-making responsibility for Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Sudan, the West Bank and Gaza, and Yemen.

Jorge Delva, Ph.D., M.S.W., a native of Chile, is professor of social work and associate dean, School of Social Work at the University of Michigan. He conducts research focusing on addressing and reducing health disparities and helping improve the lives of low-income and racial and ethnic minority populations. His research began in Honolulu two decades ago where he worked on Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)-funded projects aimed at improving the health and mental health of Asian and Pacific Islander children and their families. His more recent state and National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded projects show his dedication to combating health disparities. His work has served to advance the substance abuse field’s understanding of psychosocial-cultural mechanisms associated with substance using behaviors among Hispanic/Latino, African American, and American Indians of lower socioeconomic position in the United States and with disadvantaged populations in Latin America.

Julian Fisher, M.Sc., M.I.H., is an experienced policy advisor specializing in public health and the environment. Work experience in a diverse range of professional environments and geographical locations, covering Antarctica, Europe, Falkland Islands, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, and Tanzania within various sectors and organizations, including international public health policy and advocacy, health profession (federation) management, undergraduate and post-graduate education, both classroom and Web based. Currently based at the Medical School Hannover working in a consultancy cooperation with the World Health Organization (WHO). Dr. Fisher earned his B.D.S. (dentistry) from Birmingham University in 1985, his M.Sc. (HIV/

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee Member Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×

AIDS) from Stellenbosch University in 2002, and his M.I.H. (international health) from Charite University in 2006.

Bianca Frogner, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Department of Family Medicine and director of the Center for Health Workforce Studies in the School of Medicine at the University of Washington (UW). Dr. Frogner is an NIH-trained health economist with expertise in health workforce, labor economics, health spending, health insurance coverage and reimbursement, international health systems, and welfare reform. She has published in leading health care journals such as Health Affairs and Health Services Research and Medical Care. Dr. Frogner has been funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). Prior to joining UW, Dr. Frogner was an assistant professor in the Health Services Management and Leadership Department in the Milken Institute School of Public Health at The George Washington University (GW) from 2009 to 2015. At GW, she was the deputy director of the Health Workforce Research Center. Dr. Frogner completed a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health in 2009. Dr. Frogner received her Ph.D. in health economics at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in 2008. She received her B.A. at the University of California, Berkeley, in molecular and cell biology in 2001.

Cara V. James, Ph.D., is the director of the Office of Minority Health at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). Prior to joining the Office of Minority Health at CMS, Dr. James was the director of the Disparities Policy Project and the director of the Barbara Jordan Health Policy Scholars Program at the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, where she was responsible for addressing a broad array of health and access to care issues for racial and ethnic minorities and other underserved populations, including the potential impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, analyses of state-level disparities in health and access to care, and disparities in access to care among individuals living in health professional shortage areas. Prior to joining the staff at Kaiser, she worked at Harvard University and The Picker Institute. Dr. James is a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities and has served on several Institute of Medicine (IOM) committees, including the Committee on Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2020. She has published several peer-reviewed articles and other publications, and was a co-author for one of the background chapters for the IOM report Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care. Dr. James received her Ph.D. in health policy and her A.B. in psychology from Harvard University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee Member Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×

Malual Mabur, M.B.B.S., is a graduate of a medical school in Khartoum, Sudan. He obtained his master’s degree in Tropical Medicine and International Health from University of London in the United Kingdom. Dr. Mabur received his post-graduate diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene from the Royal College of Physicians of London. He moved to the United States in 2010 and is preparing to sit for the United States Medical Licensing Exam. He has worked in different fields oversees and within the United States. He currently works as Health Promotion Specialist and Community Health Outreach Worker with the City of Portland, Maine. His work is focused on serving the access and navigation needs of the Arabic speaking communities in Portland. Dr. Mabur’s position is funded by an HRSA, Nurse Education, Practice, Quality and Retention (NEPQR) grant administered by the University of New England and also through CHANNELS (Community, Health, Access, Network, Navigate, Education, Leadership, and Service), which aims to improve immigrant and refugee health in Maine through innovations in team-based care.

Laura Magaña Valladares, Ph.D., has a bachelor’s degree in education, a master’s degree in educational technology, and a Ph.D. in educational administration from Gallaudet University in Washington, DC. She is a certified trainer in the cognitive programs of the Hadassah-Wizo-Canada Research Institute of Israel. Dr. Magaña has more than 30 years dedicated to higher education in public and private universities in Mexico; educational organizations in United States; United Nations programs and nongovernmental organizations in Central America and Europe. Among her multiple positions are the following: Advisers’ Coordinator in the Special Education Department of Mexico State; Educational Consultant for UNICEF; Dean of the School of Education University of the Americas; Executive Director of the Mexican-American Institute of Cultural Affairs; Consultant for the International Educational Programs, Denmark Government; General Academic Coordinator, Anahuac University; Educational Consultant, Easter Seals, Michigan, USA; Dean, School of Education and Human Development, La Salle University. She has also been a teacher, trainer, and lecturer in diverse forums in national and foreign universities. For the past 10 years she has been the academic dean of the National Institute of Public Health in Mexico leading the most important educational and technological innovation of the school in its 92 years of existence having a regional impact. Her research interest is in learning environments and the use of technology in education. She is member of the National System of Researchers of Mexico (SNI) and the State System of Researchers (SEI). Dr. Magaña is an active member in community educational organizations such as the Mexican Association for the gifted and talented; The International Net for the Education of the deaf person; board member of the College of Arts and Sciences

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee Member Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×

at Oakland University; Executive board member of Troped; Active member of the International Advisory Committee (IAC) of Public Health Global and President of the Capacity Building Committee Global Evaluation and Monitoring Network for Health (GEMNet), among others.

Spero M. Manson, Ph.D. (Pembina Chippewa), a medical anthropologist and professor of psychiatry, heads the American Indian and Alaska Native Programs at the University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center. His programs include 9 national centers, totaling $65 million in sponsored activities which entail research, program development, and training among 102 Native communities, spanning rural, reservation, urban, and village settings. Dr. Manson has published 160 articles on the assessment, epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of physical, alcohol, drug, as well as mental health problems in this special population. A member of the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), he has received numerous awards, including three Distinguished Service Awards from the Indian Health Services (IHS) (1985, 1996, 2004), the prestigious Rema Lapouse Mental Health Epidemiology Award from the American Public Health Association (APHA) (1998), two Distinguished Mentor Awards from the Gerontological Society of America (2006, 2007), the Herbert W. Nickens Award from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) (2006), and the George Foster Award for Excellence from the Society for Medical Anthropology (2006). Dr. Manson received his Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Minnesota.

Adewale Troutman, M.D., M.P.H., CPH, is professor and associate dean for Health Equity and Community Engagement at the University of South Florida. He has an M.D. from New Jersey Medical School, a master’s in public health from Columbia University, master’s in Black studies from the State University of New York in Albany, and as of October 2009, board certification from the National Board of Public Health Examiners. He is a residency trained family physician graduating from residency at the Medical University of South Carolina. His career has included clinical emergency medicine, hospital administration, academic, and public health practice. He served as an associate professor in the University of Louisville’s School of Public Health and Information Sciences while directing the Metro Louisville Department of Public Health and Wellness. His experience includes special consultancies with WHO in Thailand and Japan, health assessment missions in Angola, Jamaica, and Zaire and training in India and Austria. His commitment to justice has evolved into his nationally recognized efforts to create health equity and the supremacy of the social determinants of health, the founding of the first Center for Health Equity at a local health department and the creation of the Mayors Healthy Hometown Movement.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee Member Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×

He is also credited with the passage of one of the strongest antismoking ordinances in the country. Dr. Troutman serves a member or past member of the National Board of Public Health Examiners, the Academy for Health Equity, the Health and Human Services Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Health Promotion Disease Prevention Healthy People 2020, the Health and Human Services Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Infant Mortality, the Board of Directors of Public Health Law and Policy, the Executive Board of the American Public Health Association the African American Heritage Center, and the National Association of County and City Health Officers.

Antonia M. Villarruel, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, is professor and the Margaret Bond Simon Dean of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. Internationally renowned for her leadership in policy, practice, and research, Dr. Villarruel is a former board member of the American Academy of Nursing (AAN) and was elected to the NAM in 2007. Prior to becoming dean, Dr. Villarruel was a professor, the Nola J. Pender Collegiate Chair and the associate dean for research and global affairs at the University of Michigan School of Nursing. She also held a joint faculty appointment in the School of Public Health and was director of the school’s WHO Collaborating Center for Research and Clinical Training in Health Promotion Nursing. She led interdisciplinary and multi-school strategic planning processes to help the University of Michigan integrate the research, education, practice and global missions of the school, the health system and the university. Her efforts to support nursing faculty in developing research programs led to a steady increase in funding from the NIH. Among her national leadership roles, Dr. Villarruel is a former board member of the AAN, a board member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice, and co-chair of the Academies’ Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities. She received her Ph.D. in nursing from Wayne State University.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Staffx

Patricia A. Cuff, M.S., R.D., M.P.H., is a senior program officer for the Board on Global Health within the health and medicine division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Her primary role is the director of the Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education. She is co-directing the study on clinical trials during the 2014-2015 Ebola outbreak and was the Country Liaison to the Uganda National Academy of Sciences, where she worked for 11 years with African academy staff and members in developing their capacity to provide evidence-based science advice to their governments and to their nations. Prior to her role

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee Member Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×

with the African academies, she was the study director for the Committee on the Options for Overseas Placement of U.S. Health Professionals and with the Board on Neuroscience and Behavioral Health. Ms. Cuff joined the Academies staff to work on the report Microbial Threats to Health: Emergence, Detection, and Response under the Board on Global Health. Before coming to Washington, DC, Ms. Cuff worked at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York City in the field of HIV-nutrition as a counselor, researcher, and lecturer on topics of adult and pediatric HIV. She received an M.S. in Nutrition and an M.P.H. in Population and Family Health from Columbia University, and performed her undergraduate studies at the University of Connecticut.

Megan M. Perez is a research associate (RA) with the Board on Global Health of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She began her tenure with the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in June 2011 as a senior program assistant, and later a research assistant, for the Forum on Global Violence Prevention. There, she worked on activities related to communications and technology for violence prevention, the contagion of violence, the evidence for violence prevention, and elder abuse and its prevention. In December 2012, Ms. Perez began working for the Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education (HPE). On this project, she works on activities related to HPE, such as interprofessional education and community-engaged HPE. She worked on the IOM report Measuring the Impact of Interprofessional Education on Collaborative Practice and Patient Outcomes. Ms. Perez is also a volunteer and volunteer coordinator with the Academies’ Job Squad, which works with unemployed or underemployed clients on their resumes, cover letters, and job applications. She graduated in May 2011 from the College of Arts and Sciences at Boston College. She has a B.A. with a major in political science and a minor in faith, peace, and justice.

Bridget Callaghan is a research assistant with the Board on Global Health of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, where she works with the Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education (Global Forum). Ms. Callaghan first came to the IOM in January 2015 as a senior program assistant for the Global Forum. In 2014, Ms. Callaghan received her B.S. in Community & Nonprofit Leadership and her B.A. in U.S. history from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She also received minor degrees in environmental studies and American Indian studies. At Wisconsin, Ms. Callaghan conducted community-based research projects concerning food justice and community nutrition education in collaboration with the Gaylord Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee Member Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×

Patrick W. Kelley, M.D., Dr.P.H., joined the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in July 2003 as the director of the Board on Global Health. He has subsequently also been appointed the director of the Board on African Science Academy Development. Dr. Kelley has overseen a portfolio of IOM expert consensus studies and convening activities on subjects as wide ranging as the evaluation of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), the U.S. commitment to global health, sustainable surveillance for zoonotic infections, cardiovascular disease prevention in low- and middle-income countries, interpersonal violence prevention in low- and middle-income countries, and microbial threats to health. He also directs a unique capacity-building effort, the African Science Academy Development Initiative, which over ten years aims to strengthen the capacity of eight African academies to provide independent, evidence-based advice their governments on scientific matters. Prior to joining the Academies Dr. Kelley served in the U.S. Army for more than 23 years as a physician, residency director, epidemiologist, and program manager. In his last U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) position, Dr. Kelley founded and directed the DoD Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (DoD-GEIS). This responsibility entailed managing surveillance and capacity-building partnerships with numerous elements of the federal government and with health ministries in more than 45 developing countries. He also founded the DoD Accession Medical Standards Analysis and Research Activity. Dr. Kelley is an experienced communicator, having lectured in English or Spanish in more than 20 countries. He has published more than 70 scholarly papers, book chapters, and monographs. Dr. Kelley obtained his M.D. from the University of Virginia and his Dr.P.H. in epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. He is also board certified in Preventive Medicine and Public Health.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee Member Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee Member Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee Member Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×
Page 149
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee Member Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×
Page 150
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee Member Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×
Page 151
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee Member Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×
Page 152
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee Member Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×
Page 153
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee Member Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21923.
×
Page 154
A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health Get This Book
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The World Health Organization defines the social determinants of health as “the conditions in which people are born, grow, work, live, and age, and the wider set of forces and systems shaping the conditions of daily life.” These forces and systems include economic policies, development agendas, cultural and social norms, social policies, and political systems. In an era of pronounced human migration, changing demographics, and growing financial gaps between rich and poor, a fundamental understanding of how the conditions and circumstances in which individuals and populations exist affect mental and physical health is imperative. Educating health professionals about the social determinants of health generates awareness among those professionals about the potential root causes of ill health and the importance of addressing them in and with communities, contributing to more effective strategies for improving health and health care for underserved individuals, communities, and populations.

Recently, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop to develop a high-level framework for such health professional education. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health also puts forth a conceptual model for the framework’s use with the goal of helping stakeholder groups envision ways in which organizations, education, and communities can come together to address health inequalities.

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