National Academies Press: OpenBook

Roadway Safety Tools for Local Agencies (2003)

Chapter: APPENDIX B Summary of Survey Results

« Previous: APPENDIX A Survey Questionnaires
Page 37
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX B Summary of Survey Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2003. Roadway Safety Tools for Local Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21959.
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Page 38
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX B Summary of Survey Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2003. Roadway Safety Tools for Local Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21959.
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Page 38
Page 39
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX B Summary of Survey Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2003. Roadway Safety Tools for Local Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21959.
×
Page 39
Page 40
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX B Summary of Survey Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2003. Roadway Safety Tools for Local Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21959.
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Page 40

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37 APPENDIX B Summary of Survey Results State DOTs were asked to identify tools they use to analyze road and street safety that would be most useful for local agencies. The following tools were identified: Missouri: Road Safety Audits Work Zone Safety and Flagger Training MUTCD Work Zone Pocket Guides Analysis and Correction of High Accident Locations (HAL Manual). Arizona: Traffic Accident Database. Maine: TIDE (Transportation Information for Decision Enhancement), a GIS-linked data warehouse. Washington: Traffic Data Office has applications for analyzing crash history in categories of High Accident Locations (HAL), High Accident Corridors (HAC), and Pedestrian Accident Locations (PALS). Wyoming: Use crash data to look at accident concentrations—a computerized database, available to local agencies. North Dakota: Intersection Magic Crash Diagramming Software Clear Zone Safety Review, Traffic Data, Crash Data. Georgia: Software written by the department for use with the accident data and road inventory database—not useful for local agencies. Texas: PASSER II, III, CORSIMS, SYNCRO, AASHTO’s Roadside Design Guide Hazard Elimination Manual. Massachusetts: A good crash record system Prioritize and publish high accident locations, the “High 1000” list. Delaware: Traffic Counts, Road Inventory, Critical Rate Ratio Methodology. Colorado: Databases of accidents on State Highways, referenced by MP Software includes SYNCHRO/SIM TRAFFIC, Highway Capacity. Florida: High Crash Location listings for intersections with state routes. Kansas: Retain consultants to conduct traffic studies Provide training to local transportation professionals in work zone traffic control and other safety areas. Nebraska: Analysis of mainframe crash database using QMF A new hazardous location process is being developed for state highways. New Mexico: Roadway System Crash Database New Mexico Highway Safety Improvement Program. West Virginia: Accident listings and summaries. Iowa: Access Accident Location Analysis System (customized Iowa software) Intersection Magic Collision Diagram.

38 Montana: Access to crash records ITE Traffic Safety Tool Box AASHTO Yellow Book Northwestern University table correlating crash trends to causes and potential countermeasures MUTCD, Roadside Design Guide, safety reports. South Carolina: Collision locations, engineering reviews of roadways. Nova Scotia: Provincial Collision Rate Book used to pinpoint sections of road with higher than average collision rates. Calgary: Automated Collision Analysis Systems Collision Analysis and Conflict Analysis Training Road Safety Audit Training (Design and Operational). Alberta: System of Special Monitoring Locations—locations with three similar type collisions in a period of five years are identified. New Brunswick: Transportation Association of Canada (TAC), MUTCD, and design manuals are used. Also share collision statistics with local agencies. State DOTs were asked if they have a priority safety improvement program that would be useful for local agencies. Of those who responded, 16 said “Yes” and 7 said “No.” State DOTs were asked if they partner with local agencies. Of those who responded, 20 said “Yes,” whereas only 2 said “No.” Local agencies were asked to identify the most frequently used safety tool for their agency’s assessment of safety issues. The following tools were identified by local agencies: Electronic traffic counts Citation statistics Training in work zone traffic control Inspections based on complaints or high accident rates Intersection analysis signal warrant studies Review of all crashes reported to law enforcement Software to track roadside hazards—inventory and prioritize hazards Crash report review Accident records, collision diagrams Accident record system Magic software Accident pattern diagrams from SCARS Crash data Access database for accident query and history for problem analysis and evaluation Review of traffic safety proposals by a Technical Traffic Committee Concerns of road crews Citizen requests Employee feedback/input Monthly review of crash statistics—analyze and address the issues Crash history of the area under investigation and cost–benefit analysis of proposed corrective measure Accident data, traffic counts, and citizen complaints Access MUTCD, traffic engineering reference manuals, ITE publications, AASHTO publications, and sound engineering judgment Site visits and highway patrol accident reports Citizen complaints

39 Sheriff department reports Common sense, MUTCD Police Department Crash analysis Signs. Local agencies were asked if they have funding specifically set aside to make identified safety improvements. Of those who responded, 14 said “Yes” and 18 said “No.” Local agencies were asked if they have a priority safety improvement program. Of those who responded, 13 said “Yes” and 18 said “No.” LTAP centers were asked to identify what they thought was the most significant safety tool to provide local agencies to advance safety on their roads and streets. The following tools were identified by LTAP centers: Central clearinghouse of information on available resources Crash Location Identification Program Up-to-date training on application of standards and guidelines; this includes best practices, what’s working and what’s not, and new innovations Workshops to emphasize work zone safety One-on-one training that includes photos, case studies, and opportunities for discussion Hands-on, on-site safety training courses Traffic sign inventory Proper training on the use of signs and pavement markings, the concept of clear zone, and increased funding for improvement of bridges and culverts Hands-on, state-specific work zone training MUTCD training, field visits, funds to erect adequate road signs Better local road traffic safety data and the training to use it effectively Competent inspections—having knowledgeable agency employees on the lookout for things that would adversely affect safety A simple, 4-hour class and a short publication showing safety tools/practices to have available Training and information on current best practices and the requirements to achieve and maintain a safe environment on their roads and streets To help local road managers to assign appropriate priority to roads and street safety issues; provide information on accidents caused by inadequate design and maintenance Work zone safety class, work zone safety guide, flagger training Safety training workshops, our SAFER manual, and other publications that locals can use Implementing a Safety Management System Keeping work zone safety a key priority—double penalties in work zones (enforced) Education, basic awareness, and training on all aspects of traffic standards of MUTCD and work zone safety Training, training, training. LTAP centers identified the five most important tools they provide to local agencies for improving safety on their roads and streets. The responses were varied, but boiled down to the following categories: Training/workshops 41 responses Publications and videos (MUTCD) 26 responses Technical assistance/advice 10 responses Equipment 7 responses Newsletter articles 5 responses Software 4 responses Technology transfer 2 responses

40 Responses to the question, “What would you like to be able to provide a local agency to assist in their safety program (not more money)?” were as follows: Information helping them to identify a source to fulfill their needs. More intense and comprehensive training in economic benefits of safe construction procedures from design to maintenance. Workshops and/or training. Enhanced training tools. Heavy equipment training and operation awareness. Computer software for signing. A procedure for roadway safety reviews on existing local roads and intersections—used as criteria to distribute FHWA funds in an expedited fashion. Expand current training curriculum to include computer-based training options and to involve them in Community Traffic Safety Teamwork—include city, county, state, and federal representatives. Prepared formats for checking and inventorying roadside safety features—checklists. Training on identifying and using effective, low-cost safety improvements. Training in inspections, risk management, and management systems. Offer class and publication showing different tools for safety within their community. Use site visits to help them use this tool. Such tools are frequently not used because the reference material they get is too far above their level. The time and responses to provide a current reference source for worker personal safety issues (OSHA related). To help local road managers assign appropriate priority to roads and street safety issues, provide information on accidents caused by inadequate design and maintenance. Work zone safety guides and training. Motivation to seriously review highway safety and implement safety improvements. Simple, low-cost software tools to support implementation of an SMS and basic traffic collision and safety analysis. Develop a legal liability training program for local agency safety improvements. Police presence in high traffic/high hazard work zones. Training and “packages” of road signs and work zone products. Educate the county and city commissions so they can better understand the need for a safety program.

Next: APPENDIX C Annotated References and Websites »
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TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Synthesis 321: Roadway Safety Tools for Local Agencies examines the safety tools and procedures that are practical and relatively easy to apply, and that can be implemented by agencies with limited financial support and personnel. Recognizing the wide variation in the operations and responsibilities of local agencies, the report acknowledges that the level of expertise in transportation safety analysis also varies greatly.

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