National Academies Press: OpenBook

Roadway Safety Tools for Local Agencies (2003)

Chapter: REFERENCES

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Page 26
Suggested Citation:"REFERENCES." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2003. Roadway Safety Tools for Local Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21959.
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Page 26
Page 27
Suggested Citation:"REFERENCES." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2003. Roadway Safety Tools for Local Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21959.
×
Page 27
Page 28
Suggested Citation:"REFERENCES." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2003. Roadway Safety Tools for Local Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21959.
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Page 28

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

26 1. The Economic Impact of Motor Vehicle Crashes, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, D.C., 2000. 2. Priority Issues for Reauthorization of the Transporta- tion Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21), National Association of County Engineers, Washington, D.C., 2002. 3. Developing Traffic Operations Engineering Training to Support Operations and Management of the Transpor- tation System, Institute of Transportation Engineers, Washington, D.C., 1993. 4. Giber, D.J., NCHRP Synthesis of Highway Practice 248: Evaluating and Measuring the Effectiveness of Train- ing, Transportation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 1997, 28 pp. 5. Hauer, E., “Workforce for Road Safety Management,” Presented at the Safety Workforce Planning Workshop, San Antonio, Tex., April 3 and 4, 2002. 6. Leiphart, K.L. and C.N. Ngo, Results from a Safety Survey: Workforce Development for Transportation Pro- fessionals, Federal Highway Administration, Washing- ton, D.C., March 2002, 42 pp. 7. Nelson, D.C., “The Demand Side: Strategies for Devel- oping a Well-Trained Safety Workforce,” Presented at the Safety Workforce Planning Workshop, San Antonio, Tex., April 3 and 4, 2002. 8. Wilson, E.M., “Safety Training: Is a New Supply Side Approach Needed?” Presented at the Safety Planning Workshop, San Antonio, Tex., April 3 and 4, 2002. 9. Traffic Safety Toolbox: A Primer on Traffic Safety, Institute of Transportation Engineers, Washington, D.C., 1999, 317 pp. 10. A Road Safety Good Practice Guide: First Edition, TRL Ltd., Department for Transport, Local Government and the Regions, Berkshire, England, July 2001. 11. Berkovitz, A., “The Marriage of Safety and Land-Use Planning: A Fresh Look at Local Roadways,” Public Roads, Vol. 65, No. 2, September/October 2001, pp. 7–19. 12. Bowman, B.L., Local Highway Safety Studies—User’s Guide, National Highway Institute, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, D.C., July 1986. 13. Briggs, D.W. and B.V. Chatfield, NCHRP Synthesis of Highway Practice 133: Integrated Highway Information Systems, Transportation Research Board, National Re- search Council, Washington, D.C., October 1987, 31 pp. 14. Dewar, R.E. and P.L. Olson, Human Factors in Traffic Safety, Lawyers & Judges Publishing Company, Inc., Tucson, Ariz., 2002. 15. Effective Communications for the Transportation Professional, ITE Informational Report, Institute of Transportation Engineers, Washington, D.C., 1984. REFERENCES 16. Ewing, R., Traffic Calming: State of the Practice, Report FHWA-RD-99-135, Federal Highway Administration and Institute of Transportation Engineers, Washington, D.C., August 1999, 244 pp. 17. Fitzpatrick, K., K. Balke, D.W. Harwood, and I.B. Anderson, NCHRP Report 440: Accident Mitigation Guide for Congested Rural Two-Lane Highways, Trans- portation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 2000, 170 pp. 18. Currin, T.R., Introduction to Traffic Engineering: A Manual for Data Collection and Analysis, Brooks/Cole, Pacific Grove, Calif., 2001. 19. “Design Speed, Operating Speed, and Sight Distance Issues: Highway and Facility Design,” Transportation Re- search Record 1701, Transportation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 2000, 120 pp. 20. A Policy on Geometric Design of Highways and Streets, 4th ed., American Association of State Highway and Trans- portation Officials, Washington, D.C., 2001 [Online]. Errata available: http://www.transportation.org/download/ GreenBookErrata.pdf. 21. Carey, J., Arizona Local Government Safety Projects Analysis Model: Final Report 504, Arizona Department of Transportation, Phoenix, June 2001. 22. FHWA Study Tour for Road Safety Audits: Part 1—Final Report, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, D.C., October 1997. 23. Guidelines for Geometric Design of Very Low-Volume Local Roads (ADT ≤ 400): 2001, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Wash- ington, D.C., 2001. 24. Goodell-Grivas, Inc., Local Highway Safety Improvement Program: Instructors Guide, National Highway Institute, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, D.C., July 1986. 25. Basic References for the Transportation Engineer, Institute of Transportation Engineers, Washington, D.C., 1991. 26. Deeter, D., H. To, M. Zarean, and D. Register, Rural ITS Toolbox, Report FHWA-OP-01-030, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, D.C., November 2001, 134 pp. 27. Forbes, D.E., NCHRP Synthesis of Highway Practice 282: Project Management Information Systems, Trans- portation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 2000, 37 pp. 28. Carstons, R.L. and J.V. Dickinson, “Safer Construction and Maintenance Practices to Minimize Potential Liability by Counties from Accidents,” Iowa Highway Research Board, Iowa Department of Transportation,

27 Ames, September 1979. 29. Dahir, S.H.M. and W.L. Gramling, NCHRP Synthesis of Highway Practice 158: Wet-Pavement Safety Programs, Transportation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., July 1990, 54 pp. 30. A Guide for Erecting Mailboxes on Highways, Task Force for Roadside Safety of the Standing Committee on High- ways Subcommittee on Design, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Wash- ington, D.C., 1994, 44 pp. 31. Bicycle Lanes Versus Wide Curb Lanes: Operational and Safety Findings and Countermeasure Recommendations, Report FHWA-RD-99-035, Federal Highway Adminis- tration, Washington, D.C., 1999. 32. Design and Safety of Pedestrian Facilities, Institute of Transportation Engineers, Washington, D.C., 1998. 33. Evans, L., “Traffic Crashes,” American Scientist, Vol. 90, May–June 2002, pp. 244–253. 34. Fambro, D.B., K. Fitzpatrick, and R.J. Koppa, NCHRP Report 400: Determination of Stopping Sight Distances, Transportation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 1997, 134 pp. 35. Chatfield, B.V., NCHRP Synthesis of Highway Practice 132: System-Wide Safety Improvements: An Approach to Safety Consistency, Transportation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 1987, 20 pp. 36. Compendium of Work Zone Research, Development, and Technology Transfer Products—1997 to 2002, Report FHWA-OP-02-053, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, D.C., 2002. 37. Crash Models for Rural Intersections: Four-Lane by Two- Lane Stop-Controlled and Two-Lane by Two-Lane Signalized, Report FHWA-RD-99-128, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, D.C., 1999. 38. Fitzpatrick, K. and M. Wooldridge, NCHRP Synthesis of Highway Practice 299: Recent Geometric Design Research for Improved Safety and Operations, Transpor- tation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 2001, 134 pp. 39. “GIS-Based Crash Referencing and Analysis System,” HSIS Summary Report, Report FHWA-RD-99-081, Turner–Fairbank Highway Research Center, Federal Highway Administration, McLean, Va., February 1999, 4 pp. 40. Guide to Safety Features for Local Roads and Streets, Federal Highway Administration, National Highway Institute, Washington, D.C., 1995. 41. Guidelines for Developing a Municipal Speed Enforce- ment Program, Report DOT HS 808 416, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, D.C., June 1996. 42. Ross, H.E., Jr., W.L. Menges, and D.L. Bullard, Jr., “Cur- rent Research on Roadside Safety Features,” Transpor- tation Research Record 1528, Transportation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 1996, pp. 28–37. 43. Fitzpatrick, K., K. Balke, D.W. Harwood, and I.B. Anderson, NCHRP Report 440: Accident Mitigation Guide for Congested Rural Two-Lane Highways, Trans- portation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 2000, 170 pp. 44. Highway Safety Evaluation: Procedural Guide, Report FHWA-TS-81-219, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, D.C., 1981. 45. Robertson, H.D., J.E. Hummer, and D.C. Nelson, Manual of Transportation Engineering Studies, Institute of Trans- portation Engineers, Washington, D.C., 1994, 526 pp. 46. Manual on Identification, Analysis and Correction of High-Crash Locations, 3rd ed., Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Missouri– Columbia, December 1999. 47. Homburger, W.S., J.W. Hall, W.R. Reilly, and E.C. Sullivan, Fundamentals of Traffic Engineering, 15th ed., Institute of Transportation Studies, University of Cali- fornia, Berkeley, January 2001. 48. Statistical Evaluation in Traffic Safety Studies, Institute of Transportation Engineers Informational Report, Institute of Transportation Engineers, Washington, D.C., 1999, 87 pp. 49. FHWA Study Tour for Road Safety Audits: Part 2—Case Studies and Checklists, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, D.C., December 1997. 50. Road Safety Audits and Road Safety Audit Reviews, Ref- erence Manual for NHI Course 380069, developed by Global Learning Systems and published by the National Highway Institute, Arlington, Va., November 2001. 51. Wilson, E.M. and M.E. Lipinski, A Practical Safety Tool for Local Low-Volume Rural Roads: The RSAR, Proceed- ings from the 8th International Conference on Low- Volume Roads, Transportation Research Board, Reno, Nev., June 22–25, 2003. 52. Parker, M.R., Jr., and C.V. Zegeer, Traffic Conflict Tech- niques for Safety and Operations: Observer’s Manual, Report FHWA-IP-88-027, Federal Highway Administra- tion, Washington, D.C., 1989, 40 pp. 53. Staplin, L., K. Lococo, S. Byington, and D. Harkey, Highway Design Handbook for Older Drivers and Pedestrians, Office of Safety R&D, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, D.C., October 2001, 380 pp. 54. “Safety Management,” CD-ROM, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, D.C. 55. Traditional Neighborhood Development Street Design Guidelines: Recommended Practice, Institute of Trans- portation Engineers, Washington, D.C., 1999. 56. Fatal Accident Reporting System, Traffic Safety Facts— Location, National Highway Traffic Safety Administra- tion, U.S. Department of Transportation, Washington, D.C., 2002. 57. Stop Red Light Running Facts: Intersection Safety Brief,

28 National Agenda for Intersection Safety, Federal High- way Administration, Washington, D.C., May 2002. 58. Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, Millennium Edition, Federal Highway Administration, U.S. Depart- ment of Transportation, Washington, D.C., 2000. 59. Tips for Workzone Safety: Checklists and Example Work Zone Diagrams, Wyoming Technology Transfer Center, Laramie, September 2001. 60. Work Zone Operations: Best Practices Guidebook, Report FHWA-OP-00-010, Federal Highway Adminis- tration, Washington, D.C., April 2000. 61. Guidelines for the Design and Application of Speed Humps, Report TENC-5TF-01, Publication No. RP- 023A, ITE Traffic Engineering Council Speed Humps Task Force, Institute of Transportation Engineers, Wash- ington, D.C., 1997. 62. Traffic Calming Primer, Pat Noyes & Associates, Boulder, Colo., 1998. 63. “Red Light Green Light—Intersection Safety,” video tape and CD-ROM, prepared by the Institute of Transporta- tion Engineers and Federal Highway Administration, Washington, D.C., February 2002. 64. Strategic Highway Safety Plan: A Comprehensive Plan to Substantially Reduce Vehicle-Related Fatalities and Injuries on the Nation’s Highways, American Associa- tion of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Washington, D.C., 1998, 66 pp. 65. Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP), Report FHWA-TS-81-218, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, D.C., 1981.

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TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Synthesis 321: Roadway Safety Tools for Local Agencies examines the safety tools and procedures that are practical and relatively easy to apply, and that can be implemented by agencies with limited financial support and personnel. Recognizing the wide variation in the operations and responsibilities of local agencies, the report acknowledges that the level of expertise in transportation safety analysis also varies greatly.

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