National Academies Press: OpenBook
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Guidance on Successful Computer Maintenance Management System (CMMS) Selection and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22103.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Guidance on Successful Computer Maintenance Management System (CMMS) Selection and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22103.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Guidance on Successful Computer Maintenance Management System (CMMS) Selection and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22103.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Guidance on Successful Computer Maintenance Management System (CMMS) Selection and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22103.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Guidance on Successful Computer Maintenance Management System (CMMS) Selection and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22103.
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The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit, self-perpetuating society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. Upon the authority of the charter granted to it by the Congress in 1863, the Academy has a mandate that requires it to advise the federal government on scientific and technical matters. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone is president of the National Academy of Sciences. The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964, under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences, as a parallel organization of outstanding engineers. It is autonomous in its administration and in the selection of its members, sharing with the National Academy of Sciences the responsibility for advising the federal government. The National Academy of Engineering also sponsors engineering programs aimed at meeting national needs, encourages education and research, and recognizes the superior achievements of engineers. Dr. C. D. Mote, Jr., is president of the National Academy of Engineering. The Institute of Medicine was established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to secure the services of eminent members of appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. The Institute acts under the responsibility given to the National Academy of Sciences by its congressional charter to be an adviser to the federal government and, upon its own initiative, to identify issues of medical care, research, and education. Dr. Victor J. Dzau is president of the Institute of Medicine. The National Research Council was organized by the National Academy of Sciences in 1916 to associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy’s purposes of furthering knowledge and advising the federal government. Functioning in accordance with general policies determined by the Academy, the Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing services to the government, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. The Council is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone and Dr. C. D. Mote, Jr., are chair and vice chair, respectively, of the National Research Council. The Transportation Research Board is one of six major divisions of the National Research Council. The mission of the Transporta- tion Research Board is to provide leadership in transportation innovation and progress through research and information exchange, conducted within a setting that is objective, interdisciplinary, and multimodal. The Board’s varied activities annually engage about 7,000 engineers, scientists, and other transportation researchers and practitioners from the public and private sectors and academia, all of whom contribute their expertise in the public interest. The program is supported by state transportation departments, federal agencies including the component administrations of the U.S. Department of Transportation, and other organizations and individu- als interested in the development of transportation. www.TRB.org www.national-academies.org

Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ....................................................................................................................................... 1 PART I: GUIDEBOOK ............................................................................................................................................ 2 CHAPTER 1: OVERVIEW ............................................................................................................... 2 Airport Computerized Maintenance Management Systems ............................................ 3 CMMS versus Enterprise Asset Management Systems ...................................................... 5 CHAPTER 2: CMMS AT AIRPORTS ................................................................................................. 7 Current State of the Industry ............................................................................................ 7 Survey Results ................................................................................................................... 7 Case Studies .................................................................................................................... 13 Compliance Requirements .............................................................................................. 14 Budget and Business Case ............................................................................................... 15 System Integrations ........................................................................................................ 16 Hosted Solutions ............................................................................................................. 19 Custom Solutions versus Off-the-Shelf Software ............................................................ 20 Future of CMMS .............................................................................................................. 20 CHAPTER 3: ROLES AND STAKEHOLDERS ....................................................................................... 22 CHAPTER 4: AN APPROACH TO EVALUATING CMMS SOFTWARE ...................................................... 26 Step One. Choose CMMS Assets ..................................................................................... 27 Step Two. Decide How To Manage the Selected Assets in the CMMS ........................... 28 Step Three. Identify Integrations .................................................................................... 29 Step Four. Analyze Workflow Management .................................................................. 31 Support for Future Enhancements and Features ............................................................ 35 Evaluation Tool Overview ............................................................................................... 37 CHAPTER 5: SELECTION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF AN AIRPORT CMMS ............................................. 38 The Selection Process ...................................................................................................... 38 i

The Implementation Process ........................................................................................... 41 CMMS Support for Part 139 Inspections and Reporting ................................................. 47 Post Implementation ....................................................................................................... 48 PART II: APPENDICES ...................................................................................................................................... 50 APPENDIX A: GLOSSARY and RELATED ASSET MANAGEMENT TERMS............................................. A-1 APPENDIX B: CASE STUDY REPORTS ......................................................................................... B-1 APPENDIX C: CMMS EVALUATION TOOL – USER GUIDE ............................................................. C-1 APPENDIX D: CMMS FEATURE, FUNCTIONALITY, AND CAPACITY .................................................. D-1 APPENDIX E: FUNCTIONS CHECKLIST ........................................................................................ E-1 APPENDIX F: SAMPLE CMMS VENDOR ASSESSMENT MATRIX ...................................................... F-1 ii

List Figures & Tables Figure 2-1 Survey Respondent Airport Types ............................................................................................. 8 Figure 2-2 Survey Respondent Airport Sizes ................................................................................................. 8 Figure 2-3 Ease of Use Figure 2-4 CMMS Fit for the Airport ................................................................ 11 Table 2-1 Lessons Learned – Support Resources ........................................................................................ 12 Table 2-2 Lessons Learned – Planning & Procurement .............................................................................. 12 Table 2-3 Configuration & Maintenance Support ....................................................................................... 13 Figure 2-5 Case Study Airports CMMS Benefits .......................................................................................... 14 Figure 2-6 Airport Operational Database.................................................................................................... 17 Table 3-1 Internal Stakeholders Roles ........................................................................................................ 23 Table 3-2 External Stakeholders’ Roles ....................................................................................................... 23 Table 3-3 Internal Stakeholders’ Roles during the CMMS Life cycle .......................................................... 24 Table 3-4 External Stakeholders’ Roles during the CMMS Life cycle .......................................................... 25 Figure 4-1 Step 1 – Determining and Prioritizing Assets............................................................................. 28 Table 4-1 Prioritization Scale ...................................................................................................................... 29 Figure 4-2 Analyze Existing Workflows ....................................................................................................... 32 Figure 4-3 Sign Replacement Procedure ..................................................................................................... 32 Figure 4-4 Typical Workflow ....................................................................................................................... 33 Figure 4-5 Potential integrations for the workflow .................................................................................... 33 Figure 4-6 Simplified Work Dispatch........................................................................................................... 34 Figure 4-7 Simplified Work Details ............................................................................................................. 34 Table 4-2 CMMS Features and Capabilities Checklist Sample .................................................................... 36 Table 5-1 Vendor Assessment Matrix ......................................................................................................... 40 Table 5-2 Asset Data Example 1: Asset Data for Taxiway ........................................................................... 43 Table 5-3 Asset Data Example 2: Asset Data for Electrical Distribution System ......................................... 43 Table 5-4 Sample Asset Hierarchy. ............................................................................................................. 44 Table B1-1: DFW Evaluation Summary ...................................................................................................... B-5 Table B1-2: DFW Functional Components of Initial Implementation ........................................................ B-5 Figure B1-1: Example of DFW Contractor Performance Report ................................................................ B-7 Figure B1-2: Example of DFW Fleet Statistics Report. ............................................................................... B-8 Figure B1-3: Continuous Improvement and Expanded Use of CMMS Software ....................................... B-9 Figure B2-1. Cityworks – Work Order Sample. ........................................................................................ B-18 Figure B2-2. Cityworks – Logbook Entries Sample ................................................................................... B-18 Table B5-1. Airport Users of the CMMS ................................................................................................... B-40 Table B5-2. Additional Modules ............................................................................................................... B-40 iii

AUTHOR ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The research for this Guidebook was conducted by Ross & Baruzzini as the prime contractor, with the assistance of cismatica, Barich, Inc., and Akadis, LLC. Pamela Bell of cismatica was the Principal Investigator and primary author of the report. Contributing authors and researchers included David Jividen and Ted Melnik of Barich. Marc Gartenfeld of Barich performed valuable editing and technical writing support. Application development is attributed entirely to Emmy Tello of Akadis. The study team would like to acknowledge the guidance provided by the ACRP 09-05 Project Panel. The team thanks all the airports that responded to the survey and provided valuable information for this report. We also thank the following case study airports and their vendor representatives, who provided data and information valuable to the development of this document: Dallas Fort Worth International Airport: Jennifer Harris – ITS Project Lead, Keith Pachuilo – SEAM Manager, Ed Kitchen –SEAMS Coordinator, John Sutten – Sr. Programmer / Systems Analyst, Meryl Fisher – Senior Database Analyst, Scott Sizemore – Airport Operations, Jim Hewitt – Airport Call Center, Dawn Delaney – Airport Call Center Trainer General Mitchell International Airport: Terry Blue, A.A.E. – Deputy Airport Director, Operations & Maintenance, Timothy Pearson – GIS Coordinator, Kathy David – Airport Operations Manager, Jenny Tremmel – Airport Control Center Operations, Phillip Crow – Airport Control Center Operations, Neal Snyder – Electrical Shop, Tony Burger – Electrical Shop, Chris Lukas – Airport Maintenance Manager, Tim Brown – Assistant Maintenance Supervisor, Ken Skowronski II – Airport Maintenance Supervisor, Holly Ricks – Assistant Airport Landside Operations Manager , Jackie Boyd – Landside Coordinator, Ed Cyprian – Landside Coordinator, Kenneth Hanney – Landside Coordinator, Mark Loach – AECOM Project Manager Seattle Tacoma International Airport: Jennifer Mims – Senior Manager Asset Management & Logistics, Aviation Maintenance, Valarie Johnson – Planning Supervisor, Aviation Maintenance, Brendalynn Taulelei – Manager Business Systems, Aviation Maintenance, Krista Sadler – Manager Program Office, Information & Communications Technology, Delmas Whittaker – Logistics Manager, Aviation Maintenance, Deb Sorenson – Asset Manager, Aviation Maintenance, Kelsi Pothier – Business Systems Analyst, Aviation Maintenance, Charles Goedken, C.M. – Manager International Operations, Airport Operations, Dave Richardson – Airport Communications Center Duty Manager, Airport Operations, Terry Tucker – Maintenance Manager Field Operations, Aviation Maintenance, David Sanchez – Veteran Fellow SMS Project Coordinator, Airport Operations, David Crowner - Airport Operations Manager Southwest Florida International Airport: Marvin Buford – Director of Maintenance Department, James Hess – Agent, Airport Operations, James Furiosi – Senior Manager, Maintenance Department, Robert Moreland – Air Traffic Controller, Angie Chestnut – CMMS Manager, Phillip Murray – Director, Information Technology, Margaret Crame Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport: John Parrott – Airport Manager, Marilyn Burdick – IT Manager, Martin Pezoldt – Database Analyst II, Jonel Schenk – Analyst/Programmer IV, Zaramie Lindseth – Airfield Maintenance Manager, Larry Swanson – Facilities Manager, Richard Swoboda – Building Maintenance Supervisor Without the assistance of all of the above, this Guidebook would not have been possible.

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TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Web-Only Document 23: Guidance on Successful Computer Maintenance Management System (CMMS) Selection and Practices provides guidance with selecting a CMMS that is most compatible with an airport’s individual needs. Airports use CMMS to help manage airport assets. The report explores ways to integrate a CMMS into airport processes, procedures, and other information technology systems.

This guidebook is accompanied by an evaluation tool, which may help airports with defining their requirements for a CMMS program.

This software is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

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