National Academies Press: OpenBook

Renewable Energy as an Airport Revenue Source (2015)

Chapter: Appendix C - Renewable Energy Funding Matrix

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Page 171
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Renewable Energy Funding Matrix." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Renewable Energy as an Airport Revenue Source. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22139.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Renewable Energy Funding Matrix." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Renewable Energy as an Airport Revenue Source. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22139.
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Page 173
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Renewable Energy Funding Matrix." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Renewable Energy as an Airport Revenue Source. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22139.
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Page 174
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Renewable Energy Funding Matrix." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Renewable Energy as an Airport Revenue Source. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22139.
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Page 174

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C-1 A P P E N D I X C Renewable Energy Funding Matrix

Voluntary Airport Low Emissions Program (VALE) APP-400 Patrick Magnotta Clean airport technology and alternative fuel projects Airport clean infrastructure and airport dedicated vehicles Emission reductions per dollar spent Commercial service airports in air quality nonattainment and maintenance areas 4 special conditions on vehicle use, labeling, reporting, and replacement Airport Energy Efficiency Program (Section 512) APP-400 Patrick Magnotta Increase the energy efficiency of airport power sources Energy efficient on-airport electrical energy production: Solar, geothermal, hydrogen, etc. Energy savings per dollars spent Eligible public use airports Comprehensive airport energy assessments (waived for LED airfield lighting, energy efficient upgrades during terminal improvement, and participation in the VALE and ZEV Pilot Programs) Airport Sustainability Plans APP-400 Patrick Magnotta Making sustainability a core element of airport planning Sustainability planning, either within an airport master plan or a stand-alone study. Measurable sustainability initiatives, effective tracking and implementation plans, and sustainability performance improvements Eligible public use airports Recycling plans - required in all new Master Plans and Master Plan Updates Zero Emissions Vehicle and Infrastructure Pilot Program APP-400 Patrick Magnotta Zero-emission on- road vehicles and supporting fuel infrastructure - Electric drive and hydrogen-fuel vehicles - Stand-alone infrastructure included (e.g., recharging stations) Emission reductions per dollar spent Eligible public use airports in air quality nonattainment and maintenance areas. If insufficient interest, airports in attainment become eligible - No GSE, only on-road vehicles (LDVs, LDTs, HDVs) - No leasing Airport Improvement Program (AIP) & Passenger Facility Charge Program (PFC) APP-500 Nancy Williams (AIP) Joe Hebert (PFC) Airport development, more efficient operations, and reduced costs Related activities include energy efficiency, LED lights, recycling, and energy assessments Justified airport improvement priority Eligible public use airports Numerous special grant assurances Program Program Purpose Program Effectiveness Criteria Eligible Activities Eligible Airports Additional Requirements Above AIP Grant Assurances FAA/APP Program Manager

Voluntary Airport Low Emissions Program (VALE) Specific VALE application in addition to AIP grant request ADO/Region to APP-400 Fiscal year for AIP, Rolling deadline for PFC Chapter 6, Section 5, p. 6-26, and Appendix S, Table S-1 - VALE Technical Report (12/2/2010) with application procedures in Chapter 2 - EPA air quality credit guidance Airport Energy Efficiency Program (Section 512) - Standard AIP grant request - Energy Assessment with a comprehensive list of energy efficiency practices that demonstrates project energy savings - Description of the project and energy efficiency benefits ADO/Region to APP-400 None Chapter 6, Section 7, p. 6-29, and Appendix S, Table S-1 - Pending guidance memorandum (contact APP-400 until then) - Pending update to “Solar Guide” Airport Sustainability Plans - Standard AIP planning grant request - Project description/scope of work that includes items in FAA’s interim guidance on sustainability plans ADO/Region to APP-400 None Chapter 3, Section 11, p. 3- 53, and Appendix E, E-3, and Appendix S, Table S-1 Interim Guidance (5/27/2010) Zero Emissions Vehicle and Infrastructure Pilot Program Specific ZEV application in addition to AIP grant request ADO/Region to APP-400 None Chapter 6, Section 6, p. 6-28, and Appendix S, Table S-1 Technical Guidance (12/13/2012) with application procedures in Appendix A Airport Improvement Program (AIP) & Passenger Facility Charge Program (PFC) Standard AIP grant application process ADO/Region to APP-500 Fiscal year for AIP, Rolling deadline for PFC Entire AIP Handbook Program Application Deadline Program Guidance AIP Handbook Guidance Submission Process Grant Application

Voluntary Airport Low Emissions Program (VALE) Entitlements and Discretionary (primarily “Noise & Environmental Set Aside”) Annual budget based on annual AIP appropriations and allocation formulas Yes 69 - FY05-FY14 $184M ($146M federal & $38M airport match) Standard AIP: 75% Large & Medium Hub Airports 90% Small & Non-Hub Airports Airport Energy Efficiency Program (Section 512) Entitlements and Discretionary (No “Noise & Environmental Set Aside” funds) As justified No EEP provides added justification or “trigger” for grants 4 – FY12-FY14 Standard AIP: 75% Large & Medium Hub Airports 90% Small & Non-Hub Airports Airport Sustainability Plans Entitlements and Discretionary (No “Noise & Environmental Set Aside” funds) As justified No 44 – FY09-FY14 Standard AIP: 75% Large & Medium Hub Airports 90% Small & Non-Hub Airports Zero Emissions Vehicle and Infrastructure Pilot Program Entitlements and Discretionary (primarily “Noise & Environmental Set Aside”) As justified No Ends after FY 2015 1 - FY 2013 50% Airport Improvement Program (AIP) & Passenger Facility Charge Program (PFC) Entitlements and Discretionary Annual appropriation Yes Information available on AIP and PFC web sites Standard AIP: 75% Large & Medium Hub Airports 90% Small & Non-Hub Airports Program

Next: Appendix D - State Renewable Energy Programs Example of North Carolina »
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TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Report 141: Renewable Energy as an Airport Revenue Source explores challenges airports may anticipate when considering renewable energy as a revenue source. These considerations include the airport’s geography and terrain, infrastructure, real estate, energy costs, public policy, regulatory and compliance requirements, tax credits, sponsor assurances, ownership, impacts to navigation and safety, security, staffing issues, and many others. The guidebook also includes detailed financial information on the cost and performance of projects that have been implemented by airports.

The guidebook also includes an appendix available online that provides sample a request for proposals.

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