National Academies Press: OpenBook

Overview of Airport Fueling Operations (2015)

Chapter: Appendix J - FAA Advisory Circular Fueling Inspection Procedures

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Page 93
Suggested Citation:"Appendix J - FAA Advisory Circular Fueling Inspection Procedures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Overview of Airport Fueling Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22141.
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Page 93
Page 94
Suggested Citation:"Appendix J - FAA Advisory Circular Fueling Inspection Procedures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Overview of Airport Fueling Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22141.
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Page 94

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93 APPENDIX J FAA Advisory Circular Fueling Inspection Procedures Excerpted from AC 150/5200-18C Airport Safety Self Inspection (retrieved Nov. 5, 2014, http://faa.gov/) 10. REGULARLY SCHEDULED INSPECTION. e. Lighting. (2)(iii) Lighting in fuel storage areas. h. Fueling Operations. The daily inspection on aircraft fueling operations should concentrate on a quick inspection for the most common problems concerning compliance with local fire safety codes at fuel storage areas and with mobile fuelers. The inspection should also include security, fire protection, general housekeeping, and fuel dispensing facilities and procedures. A more detailed fueling operation inspection should be scheduled quarterly (see Quarterly Fueling Operations under Periodic Condition Inspection). During the daily inspection of aircraft fueling operations, the inspector should: (1) Determine if the fueling operator is permitting any unsafe fueling practices or is in violation of local fire code, such as failure to bond aircraft with the mobile fuelers during fueling operations or fueling personnel smoking while fueling aircraft. (2) Check to ensure that the appropriate signs for the fuel farm are installed and that all gates are locked except when the facility is occupied by an authorized user. (3) Report and monitor any unsafe fueling practices and violation of local fire codes. At Part 139 airports, report any noncompliance with fuel fire safety procedures specified in the FAA-approved Airport Certification Manual. 11. CONTINUOUS SURVEILLANCE INSPECTION. b. Fueling Operations. The inspector should: (1) Emphasize fire and explosion hazards inherent in aircraft refueling. (2) Ensure proper bonding is being used, deadman controls are not blocked, and no smoking prohibitions are being observed, and aircraft are not being fueled inside hangars. (3) Check for proper parking of mobile fuelers to ensure these vehicles are at least 10’ apart and 50’ from buildings. (4) Check for fuel leaks or spills in the fuel storage area and around mobile fuelers. (5) Determine if the fuel farm is free of flammable materials, including litter and vegetation. (6) Report and monitor any of unsafe fueling conditions discussed above and other obvious violations of local fire code and airport fuel fire safety procedures. 12. PERIODIC CONDITION INSPECTION. d. Quarterly Fueling Inspections. Airports certificated under Part 139 are required to establish fire safety standards for safe fueling operations and conduct quarterly inspections of the fueling facilities. The inspection procedures in this section are based on the NFPA 407 fire code for airport fueling operations, which is one of the more common fire codes in effect at certificated airports. The fire safety standards for fueling operations should be listed in the Airport Certification Manual (ACM) and the quarterly inspections should be conducted for compliance to the fueling fire safety standards listed in the ACM. Sample quarterly inspection checklists for fuel storage areas and mobile fuelers are included in Appendix 5. Typical fire safety standards to inspect quarterly are listed here. Airports certificated under Part 139 are required to maintain a record of this inspection for at least 12 months. (1) Fuel storage areas and loading/unloading stations. The inspector should: (i) Check fuel storage areas for adequate fencing and security to prevent unauthorized access or tampering. (ii) Check for “No Smoking” signs that are clearly visible. (iii) Check fuel storage areas for materials such as trash or vegetation that could contribute to the spread of fire. Also check for equipment, functions or activities that could be ignition sources. (iv) Note if fueling equipment appears to be in good operating condition and free of fuel leaks. (v) Check piping for reasonable protection from damage by vehicles if piping is above ground. (vi) Check fuel storage areas for at least two accessible and serviceable fire extinguishers. Where the open hose discharge capacity of the equipment if more than 200 gallons per minute, at least one wheeled extinguisher with at least 125 lbs of agent is also required. (vii) Check for explosion proof equipment, switches and wiring that is reasonably protected from heat, abrasion or impact, which could cause an ignition source. (viii) Check for piping, filters, tanks and pumps being electrically bonded together and interconnected to an adequate grounding rod. (ix) Check for a serviceable bond/ground wire with clip at each loading/unloading facility for grounding tankers and mobile fuelers. (x) Check loading stations for deadman control features. (xi) Look for a boldly marked emergency cutoff capable of stopping all fuel flow with one physical movement. The emergency cutoff should be located outside the probable fuel spill area near the route that normally is used to leave the spill area or to reach the fire extinguishers.

94 (2) Mobile fuelers. At least once every 3 months, inspect all fuel trucks to ensure they meet fire safety standards. The inspector should: (i) Note if mobile fuelers appear to be in good operating condition and free of fuel leaks. (ii) Check mobile fuelers for parking at least 50 feet from a building and at least 10 feet from each other. Note: Some airports have a mobile fueler maintenance building that is approved by the local fire marshal. (iii) Check for flammability decals on all sides. Lettering should be at least 3 inches high. Also check for hazardous materials placards on all sides. The Hazmat number for Jet A trucks should be #1863 and #1203 for 100LL trucks. (iv) Check the cab for a “No Smoking” sign and the presence of smoking equipment. Ashtrays and cigarette lighters are not to be provided. (v) Check for two fire extinguishers, accessible from each side of the mobile fueler. Fire extinguishers should be charged, sealed and tagged from the last fire extinguisher inspection. Check dry chemical extinguishers to ensure they are only B-C rated. ABC rated multi-purpose dry chemical extinguishers are not to be used on mobile fuelers as they are highly corrosive to aircraft and can cause significant damage to aircraft engines. (vi) Check emergency fuel cutoffs to ensure they are boldly marked and operable. There should be an emergency fuel cutoff accessible from each side. (vii) Check electrical equipment, switches, wiring and tail light lens covers for explosion proof construction and reasonable protection form heat, abrasion or impact which could be an ignition source. (viii) Check for serviceable bonding wires and clamps. (ix) Check nozzles for deadman control feature. (x) Check the vehicle exhaust system for exhaust leaks and for adequate shielding if it extends under the fuel tank portion of the vehicle.

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TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Synthesis 63: Overview of Airport Fueling Operations explores airport fueling system operations at all sizes of airports. The report describes fueling standards and regulations, common operations and components, and serves as a reference for a number of fueling processes and procedures. On-airport fueling systems and components are the main focus of the report.

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