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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Estimating Bicycling and Walking for Planning and Project Development: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22330.
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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Estimating Bicycling and Walking for Planning and Project Development: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22330.
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Page 118
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Estimating Bicycling and Walking for Planning and Project Development: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22330.
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Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

116 Abraham, J., McMillan, S., Brownlee, A. and Hunt, J. D. Quantifying the Attractiveness of Cycling Situations. Calgary Institute of Transporta­ tion Engineers Annual Conference, Calgary, AB (2001). Agrawal, A. W., and Schimek, P., “Extent and correlates of walk­ ing in the USA.” Transportation Research Part D, Vol. 12, Issue 8 (December, 2007). Ashley, C. A. and Banister, C. “Bicycling to Work from Wards in a Metro­ politan Area.” Traffic Engineering and Control, Vol. 30 (1989). Aultman­Hall, L., Hall F. L., and Baetz, B. B. “Analysis of Bicycle Com­ muter Routes Using Geographic Information Systems: Implications for Bicycle Planning.” Transportation Research Record 1578 (1997). Aultman­Hall, L., Lane, D., and Lambert, R. R. “Assessing the Impact of Weather and Season on Pedestrian Traffic Volumes.” Presented at the 88th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Washington, D.C. (2009). Baltes, M. R. “Factors Influencing Nondiscretionary Work Trips by Bicycle Determined from 1990 US Census Metropolitan Statistical Area Data.” Transportation Research Record 1538 (1996). Basset, Pucher, Buehler, Thompson and Crouter. “Walking, Cycling and Obesity Rates in Europe, North America and Australia.” Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 2008, 5, 795–814. Benham, J. and B. G. Patel. “A Method for Estimating Pedestrian Vol­ ume in a Central Business District.” TRR 629 (1977) Boarnet, M. G., Day, K., Anderson, C., McMillan, T., and Alfonzo, M., “California’s Safe Routes to School Program – Impacts on Walking, Bicycling, and Pedestrian Safety.” Journal of the American Planning Association, Vol. 71, No. 3 (Summer, 2005b). Broach, J., Gliebe, J., and Dill, J., “Development of a Multi­class Bi cyclist Route Choice Model Using Revealed Preference Data.” Paper sub­ mitted to the 12th International Conference on Travel Behavior Research, Jaipur, India (December 13–18, 2009). Buehler, R., and Pucher, J. “Impacts of Bike Paths and Lanes on Cycling in large American Cities.” Presented at the 90th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Washington, D.C. (2011). Cambridge Systematics, Inc. Non-Motorized Model Development. Final Report. Durham­Chapel Hill­Carrboro Metropolitan Planning Organization (Oct. 2010). Cambridge Systematics, Inc., Parsons Brinckerhoff, Mark Bradley Research & Consulting, CCS Planning & Engineering, Inc., Hausrath Economics Group, Hunt Analytics Incorporated, Lawton Consult­ ing, and Corey, Canapary & Galanis. San Francisco Travel Demand Forecasting Model Development. Final Report. Prepared for San Fran­ cisco County Transportation Authority, San Francisco, CA (2002). Cambridge Systematics, Inc. with Deakin, Harvey, Skabardonis, Inc. The Effects of Land Use and Travel Demand Management Strate- gies on Commuting Behavior. Prepared for the U.S. Department of Transportation and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (November, 1994). Cao, X., Handy, S. L., and Mokhtarian, P. L., “The influences of the built environment and residential self­selection on pedestrian behavior: Evidence from Austin, TX.” Transportation, Vol. 33, No. 1 (2006). Cervero, R., and Duncan, M., “Walking, Bicycling, and Urban Landscapes: Evidence From the San Francisco Bay Area.” American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 93, No. 9 (September, 2003). Clark, D. E. Estimating Future Bicycle and Pedestrian Trips from a Travel Demand Forecasting Model. ITE 67th Annual Meeting (1997). Clifton, K. J. Pedestrian Demand Model & Crash Analysis Protocol. Final Report. University of Maryland National Center for Smart Growth, for the Maryland State Highway Administration, Office of Traffic and Safety, Maryland Department of Transportation (2008). Clifton, K. J. improving the Representation of the Pedestrian Environment in Travel Demand Models. Phase 1 Report. OTREC, Portland State University for METRO, Portland OR (2013). Committee on Physical Activity, Health, Transportation and Land Use. TRB Special Report 282: Does the Built Environment Influence Physical Activity? – Examining the Evidence. Transportation Research Board and Institute of Medicine, Washington, DC (2005). Dill, J., and Voros, K., “Factors Affecting Bicycling Demand: Initial Sur­ vey Findings from the Portland, Oregon, Region.” Transportation Research Record 2031 (2007). Dill, J., and Gliebe, J., Understanding and Measuring Bicycle Behavior: A Focus on Travel Time and Route Choice. Final Report. Prepared by Portland State University for Oregon Transportation Research and Education Consortium (OTREC), http://www.ibpi.usp.pdx.edu/ bikegps.php (December, 2008). Dill, J., “Bicycling for Transportation and Health: The Role of Infra­ structure,” Journal of Public Health Policy, 30 (SI): 95–110, 2009. Dill, J., and Carr, T., “Bicycle Commuting and Facilities in Major U.S. Cities: If You Build Them, Commuters Will Use Them.” Transpor- tation Research Record 1828 (2003). Ercolano, J. M., J. S. Olson & D. M. Spring. Sketch Planning Method for Estimating Pedestrian Traffic for Central Business Districts and Suburban Growth Corridors. TRR 1578 (1997). Ewing, R., and Cervero, R., “Travel and the Built Environment—A Meta­ Analysis.” Journal of the American Planning Association, Vol. 6, No. 3 (Summer, 2010). Fehr & Peers. Santa Monica Bicycle and Pedestrian Model Development Report. For City of Santa Monica (2010). Goldsmith, S. “Estimating The Effect of Bicycle Facilities on VMT and Emissions.” Seattle Engineering Department (1997). References

117 Handy, S. L., Clifton, K., and Fisher, J., The Effectiveness of Land Use Policies as a Strategy for Reducing Automobile Dependence: A Study of Austin Neighborhoods. Research Report. Southwest Region Uni­ versity Transportation Center, The University of Texas at Austin. http://www.des.ucdavis.edu/faculty/handy/Austin_Report.pdf (October, 1998). Hood, J., E. Sall and B. Charlton. “A GPS­based Bicycle Route Choice Model for San Francisco, California.” Transportation Letters: The International Journal of Transportation Research (2011) 3: (63–75) Hunt, J. D., and J. E. Abraham. “Influences on Bicycle Use.” Springer Science+Business Media B. V., Calgary, Alberta (2006). Jones, M. G., et al. Seamless Travel: Measuring Bicycle and Pedestrian Activity in San Diego County and its Relationship to Land Use, Trans- portation, Safety and Facility Type. Alta Planning & Design and UC Berkeley Safe Transportation Education and Research Center for Caltrans, Task Order 6117 (2010). Kockelman, K. M. Travel Behavior as a Function of Accessibility, Land Use Mixing, and Land Use Balance: Evidence from the San Francisco Bay Area. Thesis. University of California, Berkeley, CA (1996). Krizek, K., et al. NCHRP 552: Guidelines for Analysis of Investment in Bicycle Facilities. (2006) Kuzmyak, J. R., Baber, C., and Savory, D., “Use of a Walk Opportuni­ ties Index to Quantify Local Accessibility.” Transportation Research Record 1977 (2008). Kuzmyak, J. R., Fregonese Associates, and Fehr & Peers. Local Sustain- ability Planning Model Development. Final Report. For Southern California Association of Governments (March 2010) Kuzmyak, J. R., R. H. Pratt, B. Douglas and F. Spielberg. Chapter 15, “Land Use and Site Design,” TCRP Report 95 – Traveler Response to Transportation System Changes, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC (2003). Lawrence Frank & Co., Inc., Sacramento Council of Governments (SACOG), and Mark Bradley Associates, “I­PLACE3S Health & Climate Enhancements and Their Application in King County.” Prepared for King County HealthScape (April 7, 2008). Lewin, A. “Temporal and Weather Impacts on Bicycle Volumes.” TRB Paper 11­2536 (2001). Lewis, C. B. & J. E. Kirk, Central MA Rail Trail Feasibility Study, Central Transportation Planning Staff, Boston, MA (1997). Liu & Griswold and San Francisco State University. San Francisco Ped Crossing Model (2008). McCahill & Garrick. The Applicability of Space Syntax to Bicycle Facility Planning, 2008 Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting CD. Menghini, G., N. Carrasco, N. Schussler, & K. W. Axhausen. “Route Choice of Cyclists in Zurich.” Arbeitsberichte Verkehrs- und Raum- planung, 544, IVT, ETH Zurich, Zurich. (January 2009). Moudon, A. V., Lee, C., Cheadle, A. D., Garvin, C., Johnson, D. B., Schmid, T. L., Weathers, R. D., “Attributes of Environments Sup­ porting Walking.” American Journal of Health Promotion, Vol. 21, Issue 5 (May/June, 2007). Moudon, A. V., Stewart, O., and Lin, L. Safe Routes to School (SRTS) State- wide Mobility Assessment Study. Phase I Report. Appendix A, “Lit­ erature Review.” Prepared for the Research Office, Washington State Department of Transportation, by the Washington State Transpor­ tation Center, University of Washington, Seattle. (January 2010). http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/research/reports/fullreports/743.1.pdf Nankervis, M. “The Effect of Weather and Climate on Bicycle Commut­ ing.” Transportation Research A, Vol. 33, 1999, pp. 417–431. Nelson, A. C., and Allen, D. “If You Build Them, Commuters Will Use Them: Association Between Bicycle Facilities and Bicycle Commut­ ing.” Transportation Research Record 1578 (1997) NHTSA and BTS. “National Survey of Pedestrian & Bicyclist Attitudes and Behaviors: Highlights Report.” Sponsored by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), U.S. Department of Transporta­ tion and administered by The Gallup Organization, Washington, D.C. (2002). Parkin, J., Wardman, M., and Page, M. “Estimation of the determinants of bicycle mode share for the journey to work using census data.” Transportation (2008). Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade & Douglas, Inc., Cervero, R., Howard Stein­ Hudson Associates, Inc., and Zupan, J. “Mode of Access and Catch­ ment Areas of Rail Transit.” TCRP Project H­1 Unpublished Research Findings, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC (1996). Pratt, R. H., Evans, J. E., IV, Levinson, H. S., Turner, S., and Nabors, D., Chapter 16, “Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities,” TCRP Report 95 – Traveler Response to Transportation System Changes, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC (2012). Pucher, J. 1997. “Bicycling boom in Germany: A revival engineered by public policy.” Transportation Quarterly 51(4): 31–46. Pucher, J., and Buehler, R., “Cycling for Everyone—Lessons from Europe.” Transportation Research Record 2074 (2008a). Pucher, J., and Buehler, R., “Making Cycling Irresistible: Lessons from The Netherlands, Denmark and Germany.” Transport Reviews, Vol. 28, Issue 4, London, UK (July, 2008b). Pucher, J., and R. Buehler. “Why Canadians Cycle More than Americans.” Transportation Policy (2006). Pucher, J., and Dijkstra, L., “Promoting Safe Walking and Cycling to Improve Public Health: Lessons From The Netherlands and Ger­ many.” American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 93, No. 9 (September, 2003). Pucher, J., and Renne, J. L., “Socioeconomics of Urban Travel: Evidence from the 2001 NHTS.” Transportation Quarterly, Vol. 57, No. 3 (Summer, 2003). Raford, N. and D. Ragland. Space Syntax: An Innovative Tool for Model- ing Pedestrian Safety. University of Berkeley (2003). Schneider, R. J., L. S. Arnold, and D. R. Ragland. “Methodology for Counting Pedestrians at Intersections.” Transportation Research Record No. 2140 (2009). Sener, I., N. Eluru & C. Bhat. “An Analysis of Bicyclists and Bicycling Characteristics: Who, Why, and How Much are They Bicycling?” 2010 TRB Annual Meetings DVD. Stinson, M. A. and C. R. Bhat. “A Comparison of the Route Preferences of Experienced and Inexperienced Bicycle Commuters.” TRB 2005 Annual Meeting CD ROM (Nov. 2004). UC Berkeley Safe Transportation Research & Education Center. Seam- less Travel: Measuring Bicycle and Pedestrian Activity in San Diego County and its Relationship to Land Use, Transportation, Safety, and Facility Type (2010). Urbitran Associates. 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118 Appendix A: Seattle Tour-Generation and Mode-Choice Models Appendix B: Enhanced Four-Step Process Appendix C: Portland Pedestrian Model Enhancement Appendix D: Baltimore PedContext Model Appendix E: Baltimore MoPeD Model Appendix F: Portland Bicycle Route Choice Model Appendix G: Direct Demand Models Technical Appendix: Model Summaries

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TRB’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Report 770: Estimating Bicycling and Walking for Planning and Project Development: A Guidebook contains methods and tools for practitioners to estimate bicycling and walking demand as part of regional-, corridor-, or project-level analyses.

The products of the research include a guidebook for practitioners on a range of methods for estimating bicycling and walking activity and a CD-ROM containing a GIS Walk Accessibility Model, spreadsheets, and the contractor’s final report, which documents the research and tools that operationalize the methods described in the guidebook.

The CD-ROM is also available for download from TRB’s website as an ISO image. Links to the ISO image and instructions for burning a CD-ROM from an ISO image are provided below.

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