National Academies Press: OpenBook

Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning (2014)

Chapter: Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

39 Prepared by Fred C. McCosby, Security Program Manager of Savannah Airports Commis- sion, during the beta test phase of the tool development. A P P E N D I X C Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example

40 Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning Contents 42 1 Guidance for All Terminal Incident Plans 42 1.1 Introduction 42 1.2 Scope of the Incident Response Plans 42 1.3 Coordinated Use of the Incident Plans with Other Governing Documents 43 1.4 Guidance Applicable for All Incident Plans 43 1.4.1 Training 43 1.4.2 Drills 43 1.4.3 After-Action Reviews 43 1.4.4 Due Diligence 44 1.4.5 ADA Compliance 44 1.4.6 Current and Emerging Communication and Media Technology 44 1.5 Annual Review of the Plans 44 2 Shelter in Place 44 2.1 Introduction and Purpose 44 2.2 Situation and Assumptions 45 2.3 Duration of SIP 45 2.4 Organization and Assignment of Responsibilities 46 2.4.1 Airport Operations 46 2.4.2 Law Enforcement and Security 46 2.4.3 Fire and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) 46 2.4.4 Building and Facilities Maintenance Department 46 2.4.5 Airlines and Other Tenants 46 2.5 Checklists: Shelter in Place 47 3 Terminal Evacuation 47 3.1 Introduction and Purpose 47 3.2 Situation and Assumptions 48 3.3 Operations 48 3.4 Organization and Assignments of Responsibilities 48 3.4.1 Airport Operations 48 3.4.2 Fire and EMS 48 3.4.3 Law Enforcement and Security 48 3.4.4 Airlines and Other Tenants 49 3.4.5 Customs and Border Protection 49 3.5 Checklists: Evacuation 49 4 Repopulation 49 4.1 Introduction and Purpose 50 4.2 Situation and Assumptions 50 4.3 Organization and Assignment of Responsibilities 50 4.3.1 Airport Operations 50 4.3.2 Law Enforcement and Security 50 4.3.3 Airlines and Other Tenants 50 4.3.4 Customs and Border Protection 51 5 Natural Hazard: Hurricane 51 5.1 Introduction and Purpose 51 5.2 Situation and Assumptions 51 5.3 Assignments and Responsibilities 51 5.3.1 Airport Operations 52 5.3.2 Fire and EMS 52 5.3.3 Law Enforcement and Security 52 5.4 Checklists: Hurricane

Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example 41 53 6 Natural Hazard: Tornado 53 6.1 Introduction and Purpose 53 6.2 Operations 53 6.2.1 Recommendations During Tornado 54 6.3 Assignments and Responsibilities 54 6.3.1 Airport Operations 54 6.3.2 Fire and EMS 54 6.3.3 Law Enforcement and Security 54 6.4 Checklists: Tornado 55 7 Structural Fire 55 7.1 Introduction and Purpose 55 7.2 Situation and Assumptions 56 7.3 Operations 56 7.4 Other Assignments and Responsibilities 56 7.4.1 Airport Operations 56 7.4.2 Law Enforcement and Security 56 7.4.3 Air Traffic Control 56 7.4.4 Facilities and Maintenance 57 7.5 Checklists: Structural Fire 57 8 Electrical Outage 57 8.1 Introduction and Purpose 58 8.2 Situation and Assumptions 58 8.3 Assignments and Responsibilities 58 8.3.1 Airport Operations 59 8.3.2 Law Enforcement and Security 59 8.3.3 Airport Facilities and Maintenance 59 8.3.4 Air Traffic Control 59 8.4 Checklists: Electrical Outage 60 9 Bomb Threat 60 9.1 Introduction and Purpose 60 9.2 Situation and Assumptions 60 9.3 Assignments and Responsibilities 60 9.3.1 Airport Operations 61 9.3.2 Law Enforcement and Security 61 9.4 Checklists: Bomb Threat 62 10 Security Breach 62 10.1 Introduction and Purpose 62 10.2 Situation and Assumptions 62 10.3 Assignments and Responsibilities 62 10.3.1 Airport Operations 63 10.3.2 Law Enforcement and Security 63 10.4 Checklists: Security Breach 63 11 Active Shooter Incident 63 11.1 Introduction and Purpose 64 11.2 Situation and Assumptions 64 11.3 Operations 65 11.4 Assignments and Responsibilities 65 11.4.1 Airport Operations 65 11.4.2 Fire and EMS 65 11.4.3 Law Enforcement and Security 65 11.5 Checklists: Active Shooter 66 Annex A

42 Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning 1 Guidance for All Terminal Incident Plans 1.1 Introduction The Terminal Incident Response Plan (TIRP) software provides support for development of TIRPs for airports. Based on user preference, the final product may take the form of stand-alone plans for each applicable incident or a collection of applicable plans in one document. The tool generates complete basic plans that can be customized in Microsoft Excel to generate a Microsoft Word document. A TIRP includes the following elements: • A template for the user to provide details and features of his or her individual airport, includ- ing airport name, on-airport emergency shelters, and special operational instructions. • Chapters describing responses common to numerous airport incidents, including shelter- in-place procedures, evacuation, and repopulation. These chapters can be used in multiple individual incident plans as appropriate. • Chapters that include considerations and guidance for specific incidents that should be included in an airport’s response plans based on the airport’s terminal incident risk analysis. The incidents could include snowstorms, hurricanes, earthquakes, tornadoes, structural fires, electrical outages, security breaches, bomb threats, and active shooters. • Opportunities to insert custom direction into any of the response plans, as appropriate and desired by airport operations, emergency planning staff, and security staff. 1.2 Scope of the Incident Response Plans The guidance provided by this document refers to actions that must be initiated to manage passengers, employees (airport, airline, concessionaires, vendors, etc.), and other members of the public in an orderly, safe, and secure manner during airport terminal incidents. In addition to airport stakeholders, various professionals will likely respond according to their own stan- dard operating procedures during incidents. For example, law enforcement organizations will respond as trained to an active shooter, and the fire department will respond to structural fires. The plans generated by this tool are not intended to address these tactical responses by outside agencies. Rather, these documents address the safe and secure management of passengers and the public during airport terminal incidents. 1.3 Coordinated Use of the Incident Plans with Other Governing Documents The guidance provided in a TIRP is intended to supplement guidance provided by other relevant documents, including those listed in the following table: No. Document Name Revision No. Date 1 Airport Emergency Plan 1 6/26/2011 2 Airport Security Program 2 9/27/2013 3 Airport IROPS Plan 3 1/1/2012 4 ACRP Report 65 4 9/12/2013 5 Hurricane Preparedness and Recovery Plan 5 3/27/2012 6 7 8 9 10

Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example 43 Note that this tool does not duplicate guidance provided by the documents listed previously, thus avoiding contradiction of the airport’s currently established airport emergency plan (AEP), airport security plan, and other applicable plans. However, the plans generated by this software can be easily revised, and users may insert guidance from any existing documents as deemed appropriate. The guide is based on the following specific assumptions: • Airports have AEPs in place that govern overall incident response, including establishment of incident command/unified command. • Airports have airport security plans in place that govern the details of how security is main- tained at all times, including incident management pursuant to 49 CFR 1542.307.1 • Holistic activities that affect the entire airport enterprise, such as communication of public information through the media, distribution of timely advisories, business continuity plans, and other business-related activity guidance, are covered in related airport documents. 1.4 Guidance Applicable for All Incident Plans This section contains guidance applicable to all incident plans generated by this tool. Based on user preference, this guidance may remain as an introductory chapter for all plans, or it may be inserted directly into all plans. Regardless of the airport preference, this general guidance is a crucial element and must be included in some way in all incident response plans. 1.4.1 Training Once the incident plans are approved, a training program should be developed and imple- mented so that all responsible employees are trained within the first few weeks of assuming their positions. Provisions should be made for regularly scheduled refresher training at least annually and more often if there is turnover among staff and tenants. 1.4.2 Drills Once the incident plans are approved, it is recommended that tabletop and partial functional drills be conducted. Good practice is to conduct tabletop drills at least every 6 months and partial functional drills at least every 3 years. 1.4.3 After-Action Reviews After each incident, it is recommended that two reviews be conducted: a hot wash within 36 hours of the incident conclusion and an after-action review within 2 weeks of the incident. The person responsible for maintenance of the incident plan must maintain a record of find- ings and recommendations from both of these reviews in order to identify required modifica- tions to the incident plan based on experience. 1.4.4 Due Diligence Airport operators should exercise due diligence during and after plan development to ensure that any implied assignment of airport responsibilities is vetted and clearly understood. Further, airport operators should ensure that Title 6 provisions of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibit- ing discrimination on the basis of race, color, and national origin are incorporated into their programs and activities receiving federal financial assistance. 1 This is an example of customization in Word after the plan has been created in Excel.

44 Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning 1.4.5 ADA Compliance Airport operators should ensure that their TIRP complies with and accounts for ADA require- ments. The plan should take into account considerations for terminal occupants with mobility and hearing impairments, language barriers, and other special needs and mitigate as required to ensure the safest, most efficient means of performing critical shelter-in-place, evacuation, or repopulation measures in reaction to a hazard. 1.4.6 Current and Emerging Communication and Media Technology Airport operators should consider and, if currently used, account for the implementation of current and emerging communications and media technology to enhance the ability to relay specific warnings, messages, and notifications relevant to actions revolving around shelter-in- place, evacuation, and repopulation measures occurring in the terminal. They should consider implementing warning and notification systems through smart boards, electronic interactive signage, social media such as Facebook and Twitter, and cellular notification such as text and SMS messaging systems. 1.5 Annual Review of the Plans All airport terminal incident plans should be reviewed annually to update the following information: • Contact positions and phone numbers. • Any changes in governing laws, including federal code with respect to the ADA, and other passenger handling requirements, local codes, and so forth. • Any changes to relevant documents, especially the AEP and the airport security plan. • Any modifications identified in after-action reviews. 2 Shelter in Place 2.1 Introduction and Purpose Generally, sheltering in place (SIP) means to take cover in predesignated, structurally safe areas within a terminal or any other occupied facility. This is a short-term situation lasting until the threat or situation dissipates or has been resolved to the satisfaction of appropriate authori- ties. For cases when SIP has extended for a great length and normal operations have not been restored, full evacuation may be necessary. The purpose of the plan is to provide guidance to airport personnel for an incident that involves a SIP response. The following table lists airport plans relevant to SIP response: Title Revision No. Date Section No. Page No. Airport Emergency Plan 1 6/26/2011 III.4, V 39–42, 77 Airport Security Program 2 9/27/2013 N/A Airport IROPS Plan 3 1/1/2012 N/A ACRP Report 65 4 9/12/2013 2.2 Situation and Assumptions • The need for SIP arises in the event of immediate danger from falling debris caused by natural disasters (e.g., earthquake, tornado) or from another disruption to normal operations that might result in harm to terminal occupants if they are not confined to a structurally sound location.

Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example 45 • The need for SIP arises when passengers or personnel require additional protection that can be provided by emergency shelter or when they cannot safely exit the terminal for a short period of time, such as during severe weather conditions. • The following predesignated emergency shelter locations are clearly marked and have been determined structurally sufficient to provide adequate protection for severe weather and other emergencies: Location Terminal Concourse/Gate Level Description Refuge areas Main Concourse 2 Hilton Head Square Stairwell 3 Main Northwest Terminal 2 and 3 Administration lobby Stairwell 4 Main Southwest Terminal 2 and 3 Airport police department (APD)/TSA Stairwell 5 Main South Central Terminal 2 and 3 Host/Paradies Stairwell 6 Main Southwest Terminal 2 and 3 Admin car rentals Stairwell 7 Main Northwest Terminal 2 and 3 Airlines/public Stairwell 8 Main Mid Concourse South 2 Public shelter Stairwell 9 Main Mid Concourse North 2 Public shelter Intl hold room Main Mid Terminal 1 Public shelter • By mutual documented agreement with the airport, airlines have the following responsibilities during incidents that may require SIP: Airlines Terminal Specific Actions Delta Main Direct passengers US Air Main Direct passengers United Main Direct passengers American Main Direct passengers Jet Blue Main Direct passengers • Consumable emergency supplies that the airport agrees to provide the public in the event of SIP are: Items Terminal Concourse/Gate Quantity Refill Responsibility Pillows Main Intl Hold Room 250 Ops/purchasing Blankets Main Intl Hold Room 250 Ops/purchasing Snacks Main Intl Hold Room 400 servings Ops/purchasing • Structural plans or blueprints can be accessed by proper authorities for reference. A list of emergency resources and external contacts is provided in Annex A. 2.3 Duration of SIP • Generally, SIP is for a short period of time. • When there is notice and the event is imminent, SIP is initiated by the incident command/ unified command. Tenants and the public will be notified per guidelines in the AEP. • The incident command/unified command declares the incident terminated when the threat has subsided and it is clear that repopulation or evacuation is safe and required. 2.4 Organization and Assignment of Responsibilities The following sections outline the responsibilities of various departments of the airport and/or the city during and immediately after an incident.

46 Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning 2.4.1 Airport Operations • Notify appropriate airport tenants of the SIP operation per the AEP. Issue tenant advisories providing timely updates. • Coordinate with the sponsor city or the airport fire department for structural evaluation of terminal buildings. • Set up inspection teams (together with maintenance department), if necessary. • Ensure a smooth incident command transition as the situation dictates and incident com- mand responsibilities evolve. 2.4.2 Law Enforcement and Security • Mobilize additional resources through mutual aid, as necessary. • Provide security in shelter locations and areas requiring ongoing security. 2.4.3 Fire and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) • Lead the effort to manage rescue operations, including deploying first responder personnel and other resources determined necessary and appropriate for the incident. • Prepare a preliminary assessment of buildings for structural safety. 2.4.4 Building and Facilities Maintenance Department • Coordinate with incident command/unified command to initiate appropriate inspections as necessary to facilitate repopulation and normal operations in a safe and orderly manner. • Assist in mobilizing additional personnel for cleanup and repair. • Coordinate or organize teams to inspect utility systems such as gas, electric, and water together with airport operations. • Prepare to manage the operation of utilities, including standby generators. 2.4.5 Airlines and Other Tenants • Manage leased areas on both the secure and the non-secure sides of the terminal. • Follow airline and airport emergency plans. – Have emergency contact personnel coordinate with the airport operations center (AOC) and/or the incident command/unified command. Provide details about changes in sched- uled operations. 2.5 Checklists: Shelter in Place Airport Operations Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Provide assistance to passengers Ops mgr Provide directions and instructions to passengers Ops mgr Provide passengers with necessary emergency supplies Ops mgr Assess return to normal operations Ops mgr Law Enforcement and Security Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Provide for safe and orderly sheltering in place Airport police dept Provide assistance to passengers Airport police dept Provide directions and instructions to passengers Airport police dept Notify first responders for passenger emergency Airport police dept Meet first responders and direct them to person needing aid Airport police dept Maintain orderly return to operations Airport police dept Assist TSA in the resumption of operations Security dept

Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example 47 Law Enforcement and Security Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Ensure the airport is in compliance with the airport security plan Security dept Fire and Emergency Medical Services Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Provide for medical services of passengers when safe 165th Airlift Wing F.D. Transport injured persons to hospital(s) Southside EMS Building Facilities and Maintenance Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Monitor equipment during the shelter in place event Facility maintenance Provide assessment on all affected equipment/systems Facility maintenance Repair affected equipment and components Facility maintenance Assist engineering with structural assessment Maintenance mgr/engr Airlines and Other Tenants Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Prepare for return to normal operations Airlines/tenants 3 Terminal Evacuation 3.1 Introduction and Purpose Airports should ensure that all employees are prepared to assist in an orderly and effective terminal evacuation (whether full or partial). Employees need to familiarize themselves with their surroundings and be aware of shelter locations and exits in their working environment. The airport authority should involve all tenants in the process of terminal evacuation planning and implementation, ensure that they are aware of emergency evacuation plans, and encourage training of all employees to ensure that they understand their roles and responsibilities should a full or partial evacuation become necessary. During an evacuation, passengers will need guidance, verbal instructions, and leadership from employees. Clear and concise instructions are key to a safe, orderly, and successful evacuation. The following table lists airport plans relevant to terminal evacuation: Title Revision No. Date Section No Page No. Airport Emergency Plan 1 6/26/2011 III.2-6, IV.II-III-VI-XI-XIV 32–46 Airport Security Program 2 9/27/2013 Airport IROPS Plan 3 1/1/2012 ACRP Report 65 4 9/12/2013 3.2 Situation and Assumptions • The airport may experience two types of evacuations: – Directed evacuations: A decision to evacuate is ordered by an informed authority. Events are controlled and directed with specific instructions. Notifications and directions are given through a combination of verbal instructions, audible and/or visual alarms, and public address systems. – Spontaneous evacuations: Occupants initiate evacuation based on an imminent threat or danger without receiving instructions to do so. Their movement, means, and direction of travel are unorganized and unsupervised. • Direct lease tenants should have individual evacuation plans. A copy of these plans should be submitted to airport operations, fire rescue, and police departments. • Employees should be trained in evacuation planning, including evacuation assistance to persons with disabilities and others with access and functional needs (e.g., buddy systems).

48 Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning • The following table lists primary buildings of concern in the terminal, along with the specifi- cations of the assembly area or safety zone for people evacuating the terminal. No. Building Assembly Point/Safety Zone Notes 400 Concourse Commercial ramp 400 Ticket counters Domicile lot 400 Baggage claim North rental car lot 400 Savannah Square Domicile lot 3.3 Operations • For controlled evacuation and eventually for spontaneous evacuation, an incident command/ unified command is set up according to guidance in the AEP. The incident commander makes the decision to initiate a partial or full evacuation of the terminal. • The incident commander has the authority to declare that the emergency has terminated and to notify the airport community and the public per guidance in the AEP. The incident com- mander will also initiate the repopulation when appropriate. 3.4 Organization and Assignments of Responsibilities 3.4.1 Airport Operations • Coordinate with the incident command/unified command to announce the order to evacuate. – Contact airport tenants according to AEP guidelines. – Use the public address system to announce the evacuation and safety zones or assembly points. • Notify air traffic control of the evacuation. • Coordinate with security and law enforcement personnel to stop or divert vehicle traffic on the secure and non-secure areas of the terminal, as necessary. 3.4.2 Fire and Management Pursuant to 49 CFR 1542.3072 • Lead the effort to evacuate the terminal. • Reestablish safety zones or assembly points based on the incident. • Provide assistance to individuals with access and functional needs on a priority basis during evacuation. • Follow up evacuation with incident-specific responses, as appropriate. 3.4.3 Law Enforcement and Security • Coordinate with the fire department in ensuring an orderly evacuation. • Assist the airport and tenants in securing the evacuated areas, as needed. 3.4.4 Airlines and Other Tenants • Evacuate all employees and passengers from the areas of responsibility. • Coordinate with the airport, mutual aid, police department, and fire department to secure the evacuated sections of the terminal. • Make sure no one reenters evacuated area(s). • Safely and properly shut down critical operations and systems, as necessary. 2 This is another example of customization in Word after the plan has been created in Excel.

Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example 49 3.4.5 Customs and Border Protection • Special procedures are required by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) during evacua- tion of deplaning passengers arriving from international cities. Passengers transiting sterile corridors from inbound international planes and passengers being processed in the Federal Inspection Services (FIS) facilities must be sequestered from other passengers unless they have been processed and cleared through the CBP checkpoint. Consult the special evaluation plan developed with local CBP and the airport for specifics. Coordinate with the incident com- mand and CBP officers for a safe and legal evacuation and control of these passengers. 3.5 Checklists: Evacuation Airport Operations Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Assist airport police dept in evacuation of the terminal Ops managers Provide evacuation instructions to passengers and tenants Ops managers Ensure customer service support staff is assisting passengers with disability needs Ops managers Provide passengers with directions to assembly areas Ops managers Assist airlines and tenants with accountability of passengers and employees Ops managers Law Enforcement and Security Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Evacuation announcement APD communications Notification to FBI and TSA coordination center APD communications Respond to source and evaluate Airport police dept Evacuate portion of the terminal that is affected Airport police dept Assess total evacuation of the terminal Airport police dept Assess the need for HAZMAT, SWAT, or additional law enforcement officer (LEO) support Airport police dept Oversee evacuation and ensure escort procedures are in place Security department Ensure sweep of the sterile area is complete prior to reentry Security department Fire and Emergency Medical Services Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Contact first responders APD communication Contact EMS APD communication 4 Repopulation3 4.1 Introduction and Purpose This document provides guidelines on repopulation of the airport after an evacuation or a temporary shelter-in-place event. Repopulation is the process of reinitiating regular airport operations after any relocation of passengers. After an evacuation or SIP, a number of decisions and actions must be accomplished before repopulation can begin. 3 It is important to note that some airports consider repopulation a reentry or resumption of normal operations function and choose to include those particular processes in their evacuation plans and not in a stand-alone repopulation chapter (in the TIRP or AEP). Savannah is one such airport that performs repopulation measures in this manner. In finalization of this particular plan, the end user (Savannah) would delete this chapter and update the table of contents.

50 Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning 4.2 Situation and Assumptions • The incident commander has decided that conditions related to the incident have been suf- ficiently mitigated and it is safe to allow repopulation and resumption of normal operations within the terminal. • Search and rescue operations are completed. • Building assessments are completed for structural and environmental safety, and authorized personnel have certified buildings safe to open, either partially or fully. • All the utilities and connectivity requirements deemed necessary for operations have been restored. • Any areas that require further repair are effectively closed to the public. • Any other necessary activities, depending on the type of incident and the damage level, have been completed (see subsequent chapters). • When it is time to repopulate the terminal after all the transition activities are complete, reentry occurs in the following order: – Security employees (TSA, law enforcement agencies, and CBP) – Airport/airline employees and other tenants – Passengers will be allowed to enter the terminal on predetermined priority basis. 4.3 Organization and Assignment of Responsibilities 4.3.1 Airport Operations • Wear safety vests to be easily identified by passengers, airlines, and other agencies. • Manage resources and place them in appropriate locations to provide maximum assistance. • Assist the airlines in directing passengers, as necessary. • Issue notifications and updates through the communications center and the public address system to passengers, airlines, tenants, and the general populace of the airport through the airport information office, as appropriate. 4.3.2 Law Enforcement and Security • Maintain presence to coordinate an orderly repopulation and support reinstated passenger screening activity by TSA. Be mindful that frustration levels may be high. • Control passenger access to the terminal (for example, capacity constrained), as needed. • Assist the airlines in directing passengers through the terminals. 4.3.3 Airlines and Other Tenants • Be identifiable to passengers, airport personnel, and other agencies by wearing vests. • Coordinate with incident command/unified command and airport operations. • Update specific airline requirements that might affect repopulation. • Reinstate baggage handling of both domestic and international passengers, as necessary. • Assist in the handling of the international passengers through CBP, if necessary. • Prioritize passengers with access and functional needs by providing assistance through wheel- chair operating services. 4.3.4 Customs and Border Protection • Coordinate with incident command/unified command and airport operations to reestablish CBP services and activities as available. • Determine the order of passengers that need to be processed. • Passengers not processed or those completing the process are the responsibility of the airlines. • Coordinate with airline operations to find the best way to handle international bags.

Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example 51 5 Natural Hazard: Hurricane 5.1 Introduction and Purpose This section provides guidance to the airport operator facing a situation that involves a natu- ral hazard affecting the airport with warning. It defines the responsibilities and describes actions to be taken in the event of a hurricane. The IROPS plan will be used to address stranded pas- sengers. Ideally though, with proper early airline and FAA coordination, there should be no stranded passengers. The airport should maximize the benefit available from advanced planning with the FAA, air traffic control, and the airlines. This section of the TIRP focuses on hurricanes. Hurricanes are large-scale events that have a broad impact beyond the airport. These incidents could involve other events such as a power outage and structural fire. A tropical cyclone, or hurricane, is defined as a storm in which the maximum sustained sur- face wind (using the U.S. 1-min average) is 64 kt (74 mph or 119 km/h) or more. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the hurricane warning is issued 36 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds (Source: http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/aboutgloss.shtml#h). The following table lists airport plans relevant to hurricane response: Title Revision No. Date Section No. Page No. Airport Emergency Plan 1 6/26/2011 III.4, IV.4 39–42, 77 Airport Security Program 2 9/27/2013 N/A Airport IROPS Plan 3 1/1/2012 N/A ACRP Report 65 4 9/12/2013 Hurricane Preparedness and Recovery Plan 5 3/27/2012 All sections 1–38 5.2 Situation and Assumptions • The airport is located close to a water source. During hurricane or other natural hazards, this could be a potential source of flooding at the airport. The following table lists buildings that have high risk of flooding: No. Location Flood Level Alert 400 Central plant High 400 Baggage prep High 400 TSA checked bags High 400 Baggage claim High 400 Airline leased areas (ramp) High 5.3 Assignments and Responsibilities 5.3.1 Airport Operations • Coordinate with the National Weather Service (NWS) to get updates about the weather. When the NWS provides notice about an impending hurricane, consider holding a meeting of all stake holders to prepare for the incident. • Coordinate with the airport communications center. – Provide timely updates to all the tenants about search, rescue, and recovery operations, as necessary. – Use any alternate communications channel according to AEP guidance.

52 Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning • Coordinate with the facilities and maintenance department in the usage of emergency resources. • Make sure that all free-standing objects are tied down or secured. • Look for any roof damage or water leaks to buildings at high risk for damage. • Keep the public updated about the progress of airport operations through terminal announce- ments and news media, as necessary. 5.3.2 Fire and EMS • Set up a staging area for airport and mutual aid resources to coordinate life safety actions. • Mobilize resources by recalling off-duty personnel and mutual aid agencies. • Coordinate with hospitals and voluntary organizations such as the Red Cross to provide emergency medical services. Set up triage areas or other onsite medical services areas. • After the incident, set up teams to inspect buildings together with airport operations, law enforcement agencies, and other mutual aid agencies. • In the event of a flood, coordinate with airport operations and the facility and maintenance department to clean the flood-damaged areas. A list of emergency supplies such as pumps and sandbags is in Annex A. 5.3.3 Law Enforcement and Security • Assist the fire department in providing life safety and rescue operations. • Secure the affected facility and control the movement of personnel to and from the damaged areas. 5.4 Checklists: Hurricane Airport Operations Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Conduct tenant hurricane briefings Ops security Meet with airlines and coordinate pre-hurricane arrivals and departures Ops director Prepare terminal bldg/ramp and inspect tenant areas Facility mgr Clear all drainage structures/ditches Facility mgr Top off all fuel storage units and vehicles as well as Jet A storage areas Ops mgr Test all generators/tools/equipment Facility mgr Designate ride out crew Ops director Relocate critical airport vehicles to harborage areas Ops mgr Airfield preparation, hurricane supplies, and recovery preparations Airfield mgr/ops Law Enforcement and Security Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Send out tenant advisories and schedule hurricane briefings APD dispatch Test all communication equipment and satellite phones APD dispatch Coordinate arrival of the critical workforce that will ride out the storm at the airport Police chief Evacuate tenants from trailer park Airport police dept Block access to Airways Avenue after the last departure Airport police dept Assign parking for critical workforce and emergency vehicles Police chief Check in LEO ride out members and designate ride out area Airport police dept Brief Southeast Airport Disaster Operations Group (SEADOG) coordination airport APD dispatch

Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example 53 Fire and Emergency Medical Services Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Prepare aircraft rescue and firefighting (ARFF) facility for Category 1 or 2 hurricane 165th Airlift Wing Evacuate ARFF facility for Category 3 or higher 165th Airlift Wing Resume first responder responsibilities when it is safe to do so 165th Airlift Wing 6 Natural Hazard: Tornado 6.1 Introduction and Purpose This section provides guidance to the airport operator facing a situation that involves a natu- ral hazard affecting the airport with limited warning. It defines the responsibilities and describes actions to be taken in the event of a tornado at the terminal. This section of the TIRP focuses on tornadoes. Tornadoes are a large-scale event and will have a broad impact beyond the airport. A tornado could trigger other events such as a power outage or structural fire. The airport is provided with very limited warning. The Online Tornado FAQ (http://www.spc.noaa.gov/faq/tornado/) defines a tornado as a violently rotating column of air, pendant from a cumuliform cloud or underneath a cumuliform cloud, and often (but not always) visible as a funnel cloud. (Source: http://www.spc.noaa.gov/ faq/tornado/) The following table lists other airport plans that are relevant to the incident response: Title Revision No. Date Section No. Page No. Airport Emergency Plan 1 6/26/2011 III.4 39–42 Airport Security Program 2 9/27/2013 N/A Airport IROPS Plan 3 1/1/2012 N/A ACRP Report 65 4 9/12/2013 6.2 Operations 6.2.1 Recommendations During Tornado • Upon hearing the signal for a tornado warning or seeing a tornado, move immediately to the nearest and most optimal shelter (i.e., a clearly identified tornado shelter), dedicated shelter area, or a location with sturdy or reinforced walls, preferably in the interior and underground (or lowest level) of a building. • When in the shelter, stay in a safety position (beside a strong wall, bent over with head pro- tected by arms). • Stay in the shelter until there is definite visual confirmation that the tornado has passed or authorized personnel have announced that it is safe to leave the shelter. • If outdoors and there are no sturdy structures nearby, lie face down in a low place in the land- scape and protect head with arms. – Move away from temporary and detached structures, windows, glass panels, and overhead glass. – Stay away from tall structures that can topple such as electricity or light poles and trees. – Stay away from wires. – Abandon vehicles to seek shelter or cover. During a tornado, it is generally safer to be out- side of a vehicle than inside of one.

54 Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning 6.3 Assignments and Responsibilities 6.3.1 Airport Operations • Coordinate with the NWS to get updates about the tornado every 30 minutes or as needed. • Coordinate with the airport communications center. – Provide timely updates to all the tenants about search, rescue, and recovery operations, as necessary. – Use any alternate communications channel according to AEP guidance. • Coordinate with the city to mobilize as many resources as possible. • Coordinate with the facilities and maintenance department in the usage of emergency resources such as power generators. • Keep the airport populace updated about the progress of the airport operations through ter- minal announcements and news media, as necessary. 6.3.2 Fire and EMS • Refer to the AEP for responsibilities. 6.3.3 Law Enforcement and Security • Assist the fire department in providing life safety and rescue operations. • Secure the affected facility and control the movement of personnel to and from the damaged areas. If needed, secure the area for structural investigations. 6.4 Checklists: Tornado Airport Operations Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Monitor severe weather and weather phenomena in the vicinity of the airport Ops mgr Communicate with APD dispatch on tornado warnings Ops mgr Assist and direct in evacuation of passengers and ten- ants to harborage areas or internal stairwells Ops mgr Assist the airport police department and recheck areas for passengers and tenants not evacuated Ops mgr Remain in harborage areas until the tornado warnings have cleared Ops mgr Notify APD dispatch if there are any injuries Ops mgr Assist and direct passengers and tenants back into the main terminal Ops mgr Assist facility maintenance with damage assessment Ops mgr Conduct property and airfield inspections Ops mgr Law Enforcement and Security Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Monitor hurricane sirens and NWS bulletins APD dispatch Make a terminal announcement for evacuation instruct- ing passengers and tenants to follow evacuation instructions APD dispatch Assist and direct in evacuation of passengers and tenants into harborage areas and internal stairwells Airport police dept Recheck terminal areas to ensure passengers and tenants have been evacuated Airport police dept Remain in harborage areas until tornado warnings have cleared Airport police dept Assist passengers and tenants until first responders can access the airport Airport police dept

Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example 55 Law Enforcement and Security Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Assist and direct passengers and tenants back into the terminal Airport police dept Conduct inspections of traffic lights, communications, and roadways leading to the terminal Airport police dept Ensure that the sterile area is swept and coordinate rescreening with TSA APD/security dept Fire and Emergency Medical Services Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Monitor severe weather and weather phenomena in the vicinity of the airport 165th Airlift Wing Communicate with APD dispatch on tornado warnings and coordinate 165th Airlift Wing Respond to medical emergencies when safe to do so 165th Airlift Wing 7 Structural Fire 7.1 Introduction and Purpose Structural fires may occur in or at any airport properties, structures, facilities, buildings, or infra- structure support systems. This plan addresses only terminal areas where passengers may be present. The following table lists other airport plans that are relevant to a structural fire response: Title Revision No. Date Section No. Page No. Airport Emergency Plan 1 6/26/2011 111.3, IV.III 36–38, 76 Airport Security Program 2 9/27/2013 NA 7.2 Situation and Assumptions • Airport operations has conducted a risk analysis for fire hazard in all areas of the terminal and identified high-risk areas such as kitchens and computer server stations. Those areas are listed in the following table: No. Location Reason Presence of Hazardous Material Protected By 400 Central Plant Diesel storage south terminal Combustible Underground tank 400 Central Plant Electrical Potential fire source Wet fire system 400 Delta Maintenance Oxygen acetylene tanks Combustible Dry fire system • The airport currently has no onsite structural firefighting capability. The airport has mutual aid partnerships as specified in the AEP. • The following is a list of fire protection systems currently in place in the terminal: No. Fire Protection/ Suppression Systems Facilities Affected Contact or Other Pertinent Information, If Any 400 Wet suppression system Terminal interior Facility mgr 400 Dry suppression system Terminal exterior Facility mgr 400 5,000-gal diesel fuel trucks Terminal exterior Delta Global Services

56 Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning • In the event of a fire in a terminal area, the following personnel will notify APD communication via a red emergency phone4 and are responsible for immediate evacuation of the affected area: Terminal Area Department/Tenant Title Contact Main Operations/Airport Public Safety Dept On call/ops mgr/chief of police Police chief Parking facility Operations/Airport Public Safety Dept On call/ops mgr/chief of police Police chief 7.3 Operations • Refer to the evacuation plan. 7.4 Other Assignments and Responsibilities 7.4.1 Airport Operations • Implement actions to protect employees and passengers. • Follow evacuation procedures (assisting the airport or mutual aid fire department). • Secure the affected area (coordinating with the airport police or the mutual aid police departments). • Work with the TSA if the affected area is inside the secure area of the terminal. Follow the AEP or airport security plan guidelines to maintain security in the terminal. • Prepare to use alternate facilities if the terminal can remain open and operate under reduced capacity. • Coordinate with emergency medical personnel in providing medical assistance. A list of medi- cal facilities and information on them is provided in Annex A. 7.4.2 Law Enforcement and Security • Assist the incident commander. – Provide crowd control and traffic control throughout the facility, including media staging areas, as needed. – Secure the facilities for forensics investigations, if necessary. 7.4.3 Air Traffic Control • If the incident commander declares the incident to be a major incident that affects aircraft, appropriate actions need to be taken, as illustrated in the AEP. • If the incident commander declares the incident to be a minor incident, air traffic control is notified of the incident, and no further action may be necessary. • If the fire involves air traffic control facilities within the terminal, facilities need to be inspected for damage and operability. – Follow the air traffic control protocols for structural fire incidents, as necessary. 7.4.4 Facilities and Maintenance • Coordinate with utility companies in managing critical services to the facilities. • Conduct safety inspections of the affected buildings if trained and as necessary. If there is a need, contact the following agencies for certified building inspectors. No Name Contact 400 165th Airlift Wing fire dept Fire chief 400 B&J Fire Protection Facility manager 400 Savannah Airport Commission Facility manager 4 Another customization.

Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example 57 7.5 Checklists: Structural Fire Airport Operations Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Assist the airport police department with evacuation of passengers and tenants from terminal Ops mgr Ensure airlines reposition aircraft and fuel trucks well away from the structural fire Ops mgr Verify with APD that the terminal is rechecked for any remaining passengers and that tenants are evacuated Ops mgr Do not authorize reentry until approved by the airport fire department Ops mgr Assist tenants and passengers as the airport transitions to normal ops Ops mgr Law Enforcement and Security Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Provide instructions over the PA system advising pas- sengers and tenants of evacuation routes APD dispatch Evacuate the terminal in the area of the structural fire Airport police dept Recheck of the terminal to ensure all passengers and tenants have been evacuated Airport police dept Fire and Emergency Medical Services Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Respond to the area of structural fire and extinguish it 165th Airlift Wing Assess feasibility related to reentry of the building 165th Airlift Wing Coordinate with the director of ops on reentry to the facility 165th Airlift Wing Sweep sterile and secured areas prior to reentry 165th Airlift Wing Reentry upon approval of 165th Airlift Wing fire chief or deputy fire chief 165th Airlift Wing Facilities and Maintenance Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Cordon off the area related to fire damage Facility maintenance Assess systems affected by fire Facility mgr Conduct inspection of fire suppression system B&J Fire Protection Arrange all necessary repairs and board up area affected by the fire Facility mgr Coordinate with engineering for a full-scale structural inspection Facility mgr 8 Electrical Outage 8.1 Introduction and Purpose This section provides guidance to the airport operator facing a situation that involves the failure of power to parts of the terminal or the whole terminal. Airfield lighting criteria are contained in the FAA Advisory Circular 150-5345, and the responses to the power failure on the airfield are detailed in the AEP. The following table lists airport plans that are relevant to the incident response: Title Revision No. Date Section No. Page No. Airport Emergency Plan 1 6/26/2011 III.7, IV.8 51–52, 82 Airport Security Program 2 9/27/2013 N/A Airport IROPS Plan 3 1/1/2012

58 Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning 8.2 Situation and Assumptions • The primary power supplier to the terminal is Georgia Power. Primary Power Supplier: Georgia Power Contact: Customer service Phone Number (XXX) XXX-XXXX • The following table lists all backup generators that are available for use in case of emergencies. Specification Location Terminal Areas Served Refueling Schedule/ Run Time Special Features (if any) 1994 CAT Main terminal Terminal Daily/50 hours 600 kW 2000 Olympian Parking deck Parking deck Daily/30 hours 60 kW 2006 Cummins Ops facility Ops bldg Daily/40 hours 350 kW 1997 CAT Airfield vault Lighting vault Daily/30 hours 250 kW • The following table lists all uninterrupted power supply (UPS) systems that run in the event of a power outage. Specification Location Terminal Areas Served Backup Life Special Features (if any) Ultra 1000 AP (4) Level 2 (Savannah Square near Starbucks) APD comm room 6 hours Emergency circuit Cyber Power (AVR) 1500 (6) Server room (3rd Floor) Head end equipment 8 hours Emergency circuit Symmetra (LX) (2) Camera system Cameras 6 hours Emergency circuit Ultra 1000 AP (4) Admin server room Airport systems 8 hours Emergency circuit APC 500 (4) Machine room (parking) Parking facility 6 hours Emergency circuit APC 2200 (3) Electrical room Central plant 8 hours Emergency circuit APC Matrix 5000 Electrical room Concourse 6 hours Emergency circuit • The following table lists the priority of the systems to run on emergency power. System Power Generator Terminal Areas Served Priority Number Airfield vault 1997 CAT Airfield lighting vault Building 400/terminal and security systems as well as emergency lighting 1994 CAT Terminal Parking deck Olympian 60 kW Parking facility Operations bldg 2006 Cummins Ops facility 8.3 Assignments and Responsibilities 8.3.1 Airport Operations • Coordinate with the facilities and maintenance department to resolve the power outage. • Check if there is any power loss to the aircraft movement area. Restoring power to the aircraft movement area takes priority over the terminal. • Coordinate with the communications department for notifications to all tenants (affected and not affected), as necessary.

Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example 59 • If foul play is suspected, notify law enforcement personnel immediately. • Coordinate with the affected tenants and assist with alternate facility usage, if possible. • Once power is restored, coordinate with the facilities department to inspect affected areas for compliance, and reopen affected areas. • If the power outage extends for a longer period than expected, prepare to use emergency SIP or evacuation response. 8.3.2 Law Enforcement and Security • Assist airport operations in maintaining security in the secure areas of the terminal, if necessary. • If the incident is declared an emergency, follow procedures to maintain security within the terminal. If needed, coordinate with the mutual aid police for additional resources. • Secure the affected facilities for forensics investigations, if necessary. 8.3.3 Airport Facilities and Maintenance • Coordinate with power utilities to restore the power supply to the affected areas of terminal, if needed. • Conduct safety inspections of the affected terminal areas for compliance. • Monitor fuel consumption of the emergency generators and replenish, as necessary. 8.3.4 Air Traffic Control • If the incident commander declares the incident to be a major incident that affects aircraft, appropriate actions need to be taken as detailed in the AEP. • If the incident commander declares that incident to be a minor incident, air traffic control is notified of the incident and no further action may be necessary. • If the power outage involves air traffic control facilities within the terminal, such outage takes priority over the terminal outage. Follow air traffic control protocols for alternate facility usage until the power is restored. 8.4 Checklists: Electrical Outage Airport Operations Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Assess airfield lights and communicate with air traffic control tower. Airfield mgr Advise airlines and tenants of the scope of power failure and status and issue notices to airmen (NOTAMS) Ops mgr Send out operational advisories relative to the scope of the power failure Ops mgr Ensure fuel farm generator is operational Ops mgr Assist airport police dept with traffic if necessary Ops mgr Law Enforcement and Security Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Check all secured-area access points to ensure that the access control portals to the secured area are locked Airport police dept Identify nonfunctional cameras and establish redundancy with other cameras for critical areas Security dept Provide traffic direction at major intersections of the airport Airport police dept Airport Facilities and Maintenance Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Assess systems related to power failure and ensure Georgia Power understands the criticality of the power failure Facility mgr Call in all facility maintenance electrical leads Facility mgr Ensure UPSs are functional and operational Electrical lead

60 Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning Airport Facilities and Maintenance Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Deliver stop signs to all major intersections where traffic lights are out Grounds Fire and Emergency Medical Services Responsible Party Date and Time Completed First responder to any injuries due to the power failure 165th Airlift Wing 9 Bomb Threat 9.1 Introduction and Purpose A bomb threat is legally defined as “the communication through the use of mail, tele- phone, telegram, or other instrument of commerce; the willful making of any threat; or the malicious conveyance of false information knowing the same to be false which concerns an attempt being made or to be made to kill, injure, intimidate any individual; or unlawfully to damage or destroy any building, vehicle, or other real or personal property by means of an explosive” (Source: Louisiana Department of Public Safety and Corrections, http://www.lsp. org/bomb.html). The intention of this section is to provide guidance to the airport operator for a situation that involves a bomb threat to the airport terminal. The following table lists airport plans that are relevant to a bomb threat response: Title Revision No. Date Section No Page No. Airport Emergency Plan 1 6/26/2011 III.2, IV.II 32–35, 69–74 9.2 Situation and Assumptions • All bomb threats are treated as credible until the airport police or the responsible law enforce- ment agency rules otherwise. All threats will be thoroughly investigated. • Not all bomb threat situations will be declared an emergency. Only the incident com- mander has the authority to elevate the incident. If a suspicious device is found, the first responders should be aware of the potential presence of secondary devices and act accordingly. • If the situation calls for partial or full evacuation, then the appropriate evacuation plan should be followed. • The immediate area is evacuated if the threat is to a specific location. • Law enforcement officers have total authority to determine the extent of the appropriate evacuation area. • The size of the facility will play a major role in the decision to do a partial or full evacuation. 9.3 Assignments and Responsibilities 9.3.1 Airport Operations • Coordinate with the incident command/unified command for notifications to all affected tenants, as necessary. • If the affected area involves a tenant, involve the emergency contact person of the tenant or his or her designee in all stages of response. A list of emergency contact personnel for all tenants is included in Annex A. • Support protective actions required to protect employees and passengers. – Support and follow evacuation procedures (assisting the airport or mutual aid fire department).

Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example 61 – Secure the affected area (coordinating with the airport police or the mutual aid police departments). – Work with the TSA if the affected area is inside the sterile5 area of the terminal. Follow the airport security plan guidelines to maintain security in the terminal. • Prepare to use alternate facilities if the terminal can remain open and operate under reduced capacity. 9.3.2 Law Enforcement and Security • Determine whether the bomb threat is general or specific in nature. • Assess the threat and determine appropriate response level. • Secure the affected facility and control the movement of personnel to and from the search area. If needed, secure the area for forensic investigations. • The airport has resources in the Chatham County Sheriffs Dept K9 unit as well as the Savan- nah Chatham Metro Police Dept Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) units. Please refer to the AEP for further information.6 9.4 Checklists: Bomb Threat Airport Operations Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Assist the airport police dept in the evacuation of the terminal Ops mgr Recheck the terminal to ensure all passengers and ten- ants have evacuated Ops mgr Reentry into the terminal will be cleared by the airport police department. Airport police dept Once reentry is authorized, assist passengers and ten- ants into the terminal Ops mgr Assist airlines and tenants in resumption of normal operations Ops mgr Law Enforcement and Security Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Evacuate concourse through alfa doors with PA announcement APD dispatch Evacuate public areas by PA announcement landside at a point determined by the airport police department APD dispatch Consider a secondary potential device during evacuation Police chief/captains Notify Savannah Chatham Metro PD, Explosive Ordinance Division APD dispatch Notify TSA explosive specialist for assistance APD dispatch Contact FBI and TSA coordination center APD dispatch Give the order to reenter after cleared by the Savannah Chatham Metro EOD Police chief/captains Ensure escort is in place while passengers and tenants are in the secured area of the airport Security dept Fire and Emergency Medical Services Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Respond a safe distance away from terminal and stand by until the bomb threat has been mitigated 165th Airlift Wing 5 Customization. 6 Customization.

62 Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning 10 Security Breach 10.1 Introduction and Purpose A security breach is a deliberate or unintentional action resulting in an unauthorized access to a sterile or secure area of the terminal. This section provides guidance to the airport operator facing a situation that involves a secu- rity breach to parts of the terminal or the whole terminal. The plan is intended as a supplement to what is listed below: Title Revision No. Date Section No. Page No. Airport Emergency Plan 1 6/26/2011 III.2, XV, XVI, XVII, XVIII 97–103 Airport Security Program 2 9/27/2013 N/A 10.2 Situation and Assumptions • The severity of a security breach can be classified as low, medium, and high. Not all breaches need a full-blown emergency response. Below is a typical list of incidents and their general classifications. Incident Level of Severity Sterile area breach High Clearing of the sterile area High Breach from sterile area or public area into secured area High Suspicious bag or package vacated in the terminal or commercial ramp High • Refer to the AEP section on terrorist incidents involving aircraft when the situation escalates to high and could directly or indirectly involve an aircraft. • Regardless of the severity, all security breaches need to be investigated and documented for study purposes. Upon preliminary investigation, the breach’s severity can be adjusted so that a complete emergency response may become appropriate. 10.3 Assignments and Responsibilities 10.3.1 Airport Operations • Coordinate with the incident commander and TSA in all stages of incident management. – Follow evacuation procedures (assisting the fire department and law enforcement officers). – Secure the affected area (coordinating with the airport police or the mutual aid police departments). – Work with the TSA if the affected area is inside the sterile areas7 or secure area of the termi- nal. Follow the AEP or airport security plan guidelines to maintain security in the terminal. • Coordinate with the communications department for notifications to all tenants (affected and not affected), as necessary. • If the affected area involves a tenant, involve the emergency contact personnel of the tenant or his designee, in all stages of response. A list of emergency contact personnel for all tenants is included in Annex A. • Prepare to use alternate facilities if the terminal can remain open and operate under reduced capacity. • Coordinate with the public information office to interface with media, if necessary. 7 Customization.

Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example 63 10.3.2 Law Enforcement and Security • Use an initial team to investigate the type of the security breach and assess the severity of breach. • Secure the affected facility and control the movement of personnel to and from the breached area. If needed, secure the area for forensic investigations. • Coordinate with the TSA and follow the protocols to set up incident command/unified com- mand, as necessary. 10.4 Checklists: Security Breach Airport Operations Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Assist airport police dept in identifying the individual leaving the object Security ops Coordinate with the security department/APD dispatch for a CCTV image of the individual Ops mgr Assist the airport police department to evacuate an area in the event the object/bag is deemed to be suspicious Ops mgr Assist airlines and tenants with return to normal ops Ops mgr Law Enforcement and Security Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Activate breach alarm for a sterile area exit lane breach TSA Responding officer meets with TSA screening supervi- sor/manager for briefing and description of individual Airport police dept APD dispatch obtains description and locates individual on tracking cameras APD dispatch Airport police dept ensures jet bridge doors are secured and boardings ceased Airport police dept Decision between TSA and ASC to dump (secure) the concourse if there is no resolution FSD/ASC APD dispatch makes an announcement that all passen- gers/tenants are to exit the concourse APD dispatch Airport police dept conducts sweep of the concourse Airport police dept Decision between TSA and ASC to repopulate the ster- ile area when breach is resolved FSD/ASC Fire and Emergency Medical Services Responsible Party Date and Time Completed N/A N/A 11 Active Shooter Incident 11.1 Introduction and Purpose An active shooter is an armed person who has used deadly physical force on other persons and continues to do so while having unrestricted access to additional victims (Source: John Marshall Law School, Active Shooter Information, http://www.jmls.edu/security/active-shooter.php). The proliferation of active shooter incidents across the United States in recent years has resulted in hundreds of deaths and injuries to innocent people. The rise in these tragic events has led to the development and adoption of new police tactics to confront and stop active shooters immediately. Like many other public facilities, airports provide a target-rich environment for active shooters who are determined to inflict death and injury on innocent people. As with any other emergency response plan, all employees and tenants should be aware of their roles and responsibilities under the plan. It is important to understand that this chapter provides general guidance and is in no way meant to guarantee safety since each situation is different and all are very dynamic in nature.

64 Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning The following table lists airport items that are relevant to an active shooter response: Title Revision No. Date Section No. Page No. Airport Emergency Plan 1 6/26/2011 N/A Airport Security Program 2 9/27/2013 N/A All airport and tenant employees should be trained as follows: The first person to become aware of an active gunman in his or her area should contact the airport police department8 immediately. If there is a panic alarm in the office, activate it. Any descriptive information provided will be extremely helpful for the responding officers, such as physical description, type and number of weapon(s), location, direction of travel, and any other specific descriptive information. When employees become aware of an active shooter, they should take one of the following actions: • Exit or escape using the most expeditious route and conduct a mass notification as soon as possible. • Hide and secure any doors between them and the shooter. • Take action against the active shooter as a last resort and only when their lives are in imminent danger. Attempt to disrupt or incapacitate the active shooter. When law enforcement arrives, follow their instructions explicitly. Every employee should ensure that law enforcement can clearly see both of their hands. 11.2 Situation and Assumptions • An active shooter incident requires an immediate response and intervention to stop the incident. • The airport police have trained with their mutual aid police department for such scenarios. • An active shooter policy should be part of the police department’s general directives or stan- dard operating procedures manual. • The public information office is prepared to interact with the media during such situations. • Employees are trained and are aware of responses to active shooter incidents. • The active shooter incident is characterized by ongoing threat to public life. It may evolve into other emergency situations such as hijacking. • It is assumed that the employees and public will self-evacuate through the nearest access points. • Holding areas for the purpose of detaining witnesses for debriefing are determined by the incident commander. Some of the possible locations for holding areas are provided below. No. Location Terminal Area Served 400 3rd-floor board conference room Public area 400 International hold room Concourse For quick reference, the holding areas are also marked on the terminal maps provided in Annex A. 11.3 Operations • The priority of the initial responding officers is to eliminate or minimize the threat. Respond- ing officers will not assist in the evacuation of the facility or treatment of the injured. 8 Customization.

Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example 65 11.4 Assignments and Responsibilities 11.4.1 Airport Operations • Coordinate with the communications department to initiate the prescribed response to con- trol the scene and rescue occupants. • Follow the guidelines in the airport communications plan to disseminate information to the airport populace and public about the incident. • Coordinate with law enforcement to set up or clear holding areas for interviewing, counsel- ing, and so forth. • Coordinate with the airlines in implementing their emergency plan, if possible. • Continue to record/monitor all communications and information channels for information about the suspect. 11.4.2 Fire and EMS • Coordinate with the incident command/unified command to set up the holding and triage areas. • Follow the emergency medical plan. • Coordinate with the hospitals for emergency medical response. • Assist the medical personnel in setting up triage or holding areas for medical care. • Provide onsite medical assistance and medical transport, if necessary. 11.4.3 Law Enforcement and Security • Responding officers should not assist in evacuation until the threat is neutralized. Assist with evacuation and treatment of the injured only after the threat is eliminated. • The entire affected area will be treated as a crime scene and must be secured for forensics investigations. • Only after the incident commander declares the investigation to be over should operations return to normal. 11.5 Checklists: Active Shooter Airport Operations Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Assist and direct passengers away from gunfire Ops mgr Report location of active shooter and take cover Ops mgr Assist airport police dept in evacuating concourse passengers and tenants to the commercial ramp Ops mgr Assist airport police dept in evacuation of public area to the domicile lot Ops mgr Remain under cover or in the evacuation area until law enforcement provides further instructions Ops mgr Follow instructions of the airport police dept Ops mgr Law Enforcement and Security Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Airport police dept responds to the area of reported gunfire Airport police dept APD dispatch notifies Savannah Chatham Metro SWAT Team APD dispatch Airport police dept takes positions with long guns in the area of the active shooter Airport police dept Commanding airport police officer briefs SWAT team as they are en route Police chief/captains APD dispatch notifies Pooler and Garden City Police Depts and requests law enforcement back up APD dispatch

66 Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning Law Enforcement and Security Responsible Party Date and Time Completed Airport police dept establishes crime scene after the threat is removed Airport police dept Airport police dept assists with investigation Airport police dept Airport police dept designates area for debriefing Airport police dept Notify hospitals and medical transport APD dispatch Fire and Emergency Medical Services Responsible Party Date and Time Completed First responders stand by until it is safe to approach terminal 165th Airlift Wing First responders approach terminal after being cleared by the airport police dept 165th Airlift Wing Provide EMS to wounded 165th Airlift Wing Annex A A.1 Hospital Information near SAV The following table lists nearby hospitals, their direct contact information, and the response times from the airport. Medical Facilities Response Time Contact Number St. Josephs Emergency Center 30 min (xxx) xxx-xxxx Memorial Health University Med Cent 30 min (xxx) xxx-xxxx Candler Hospital 30 min (xxx) xxx-xxxx Medical Transport Response Time Contact Number Southside Fire Department 15 min (xxx) xxx-xxxx Effingham County 30 min (xxx) xxx-xxxx A.2 Emergency Equipment List and Locations The following table lists all available emergency equipment units available and their location Emergency Equipment Quantity Location Concourse 1989 Kohler 30 KW 1 Bldg 130 N/A 1987 Onan 50 KW 1 Bldg 130 N/A 1997 CAT 250 KW 1 Airfield vault N/A 1994 CAT 600 KW 1 Bldg 400 Yes 1999 Honda 2,500 W 1 Grounds Portable 1999 Porter Cable 2,500 W 1 Bldg 130 Portable 1999 Excel 5,000 W 1 Freight bldg Portable 2000 Cat 57 KW 1 Freight bldg Portable 2000 Olympian 60 KW 1 Parking deck N/A 2006 Cummins 350 KW 1 Ops facility N/A 2006 Cummins 250 KW 1 North parking facility N/A 2007 Power Pro 5,000 W 1 Ops facility Portable fuels for generators Diesel (belowground) 500 g 1 Bldg 130 N/A Diesel 2,500 g 1 Bldg 400 Yes Diesel above-ground tank (AGT) 2,000 g 1 Ops facility N/A Diesel AGT 500 g 1 Ops facility N/A

Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV) TIRP Example 67 A.3 Tenants at SAV: Emergency Contacts The following table lists emergency contact personnel for all tenants. The tenants are advised to have at least one emergency contact personnel onsite at all times. List of All Tenants and Their Contacts Tenants’ Name Terminal Concourse/Gate Name or Title Contact No. Airlines Delta Airlines Main Gates 11, 13, 15 Manager (xxx) xxx-xxxx US Air Main Gate 12, 14 Manager (xxx) xxx-xxxx American Airlines Main Gate 4 Manager (xxx) xxx-xxxx United Airlines Main Gates 5,6 Manager (xxx) xxx-xxxx Delta Global Services Main Below wing Manager (xxx) xxx-xxxx Jetstream Ground Services Main Below wing Manager (xxx) xxx-xxxx Jet Blue Main Gates 7,9 Manager (xxx) xxx-xxxx Concessionaires Terminal Concourse/Gate Name or Title Contact No. Host International Main N/A Manager (xxx) xxx-xxxx Paradies Shops Main N/A Manager (xxx) xxx-xxxx Sunglass Warehouse/ Flip-Flop Shop Main N/A Manager (xxx) xxx-xxxx Pierra’s Salon Main N/A Manager (xxx) xxx-xxxx Fly-By Vintage Antiques Main N/A Manager (xxx) xxx-xxxx Alamo Nat’l Car Rental Main N/A Manager (xxx) xxx-xxxx Avis/Budget Car Rental Main N/A Manager (xxx) xxx-xxxx Dollar Rental Car Main N/A Manager (xxx) xxx-xxxx Enterprise Car Rental Main N/A Manager (xxx) xxx-xxxx Hertz Rental Car Main N/A Manager (xxx) xxx-xxxx Thrifty Car Rental Main N/A Manager (xxx) xxx-xxxx Kelly Tours Main N/A Manager (xxx) xxx-xxxx

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TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Report 112: Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning summarizes the development and use of a tool that creates and maintains integrated incident response plans that address hazards in and around airport terminals.

The Airport Terminal Incident Response Plan (TIRP) tool, available on the CD-ROM that accompanies the report, assists in the development of a response plan to help mitigate the impact of events on terminal users. In addition to the TIRP tool, the report contains a user’s guide that provides a step-by-step process of generating incident response plans.

The report also contains an output example that demonstrates completed terminal incident response plans using the TIRP tool. The CD-ROM is also available for download from TRB’s website as an ISO image. Links to the ISO image and instructions for burning a CD-ROM from an ISO image are provided below.

Help on Burning an .ISO CD-ROM Image

Download the .ISO CD-ROM Image

(Warning: This is a large file and may take some time to download using a high-speed connection.)

CD-ROM Disclaimer - This software is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

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