National Academies Press: OpenBook
Page 1
Suggested Citation:"Report Contents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2013. Millennials and Mobility: Understanding the Millennial Mindset and New Opportunities for Transit Providers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22500.
×
Page 1
Page 2
Suggested Citation:"Report Contents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2013. Millennials and Mobility: Understanding the Millennial Mindset and New Opportunities for Transit Providers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22500.
×
Page 2
Page 3
Suggested Citation:"Report Contents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2013. Millennials and Mobility: Understanding the Millennial Mindset and New Opportunities for Transit Providers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22500.
×
Page 3
Page 4
Suggested Citation:"Report Contents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2013. Millennials and Mobility: Understanding the Millennial Mindset and New Opportunities for Transit Providers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22500.
×
Page 4
Page 5
Suggested Citation:"Report Contents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2013. Millennials and Mobility: Understanding the Millennial Mindset and New Opportunities for Transit Providers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22500.
×
Page 5

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT This work was sponsored by the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) in cooperation with the Transit Development Corporation. It was conducted through the Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP), which is administered by the Transportation Research Board (TRB) of the National Academies. COPYRIGHT INFORMATION Authors herein are responsible for the authenticity of their materials and for obtaining written permissions from publishers or persons who own the copyright to any previously published or copyrighted material used herein. Cooperative Research Programs (CRP) grants permission to reproduce material in this publication for classroom and not-for-profit purposes. Permission is given with the understanding that none of the material will be used to imply TRB, AASHTO, FAA, FHWA, FMCSA, FTA, Transit Development Corporation, or AOC endorsement of a particular product, method, or practice. It is expected that those reproducing the material in this document for educational and not-for-profit uses will give appropriate acknowledgment of the source of any reprinted or reproduced material. For other uses of the material, request permission from CRP. DISCLAIMER The opinions and conclusions expressed or implied in this report are those of the researchers who performed the research. They are not necessarily those of the Transportation Research Board, the National Research Council, or the program sponsors. The information contained in this document was taken directly from the submission of the author(s). This material has not been edited by TRB.

The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit, self-perpetuating society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. On the authority of the charter granted to it by the Congress in 1863, the Academy has a mandate that requires it to advise the federal government on scientific and technical matters. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone is president of the National Academy of Sciences. The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964, under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences, as a parallel organization of outstanding engineers. It is autonomous in its administration and in the selection of its members, sharing with the National Academy of Sciences the responsibility for advising the federal government. The National Academy of Engineering also sponsors engineering programs aimed at meeting national needs, encourages education and research, and recognizes the superior achievements of engineers. Dr. C. D. Mote, Jr., is president of the National Academy of Engineering. The Institute of Medicine was established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to secure the services of eminent members of appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. The Institute acts under the responsibility given to the National Academy of Sciences by its congressional charter to be an adviser to the federal government and, on its own initiative, to identify issues of medical care, research, and education. Dr. Harvey V. Fineberg is president of the Institute of Medicine. The National Research Council was organized by the National Academy of Sciences in 1916 to associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy’s purposes of furthering knowledge and advising the federal government. Functioning in accordance with general policies determined by the Academy, the Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing services to the government, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. The Council is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone and Dr. C. D. Mote, Jr., are chair and vice chair, respectively, of the National Research Council. The Transportation Research Board is one of six major divisions of the National Research Council. The mission of the Transporta- tion Research Board is to provide leadership in transportation innovation and progress through research and information exchange, conducted within a setting that is objective, interdisciplinary, and multimodal. The Board’s varied activities annually engage about 7,000 engineers, scientists, and other transportation researchers and practitioners from the public and private sectors and academia, all of whom contribute their expertise in the public interest. The program is supported by state transportation departments, federal agencies including the component administrations of the U.S. Department of Transportation, and other organizations and individu- als interested in the development of transportation. www.TRB.org www.national-academies.org

Acknowledgments This study was conducted for the American Public Transportation Association (APTA), with funding provided through the Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Project J-11, Quick-Response Research on Long-Term Strategic Issues. The TCRP is sponsored by the Federal Transit Administration (FTA); directed by the Transit Development Corporation, the education and research arm of the APTA; and administered by The National Academies through the Transportation Research Board. Project J-11 is intended to fund quick response studies on behalf of the TCRP Oversight and Project Selection (TOPS) Committee, the FTA, and the APTA and its committees. The work was guided by a project panel with representatives from several national and state transportation research and planning organizations, private consultants, and the American Public Transit Association (APTA). Neela Sakaria and Natalie Stehfest of Latitude Research would like to acknowledge and thank the many respondents and interviewees who provided data and information about their transportation behaviors, attitudes and desires for future transportation offerings. Additionally, our deep appreciation goes to the project panel members and Dianne Schwager, the Senior Program Officer for this project, for their detailed review of study documents and thoughtful feedback.

TCRP J-11/Task 17 Panel Roster PANEL MEMBERS: NANCY CHINLUND, Chief, Office of Planning, Policy and Innovation, California DOT JEFFREY MAKI, Product Development Manager, The Control Group NANCY MCGUCKIN, Travel Behavior Analyst ELAINE R. MURAKAMI, Community Planner, Federal Highway Administration MICHAEL MURRAY, Public Affairs Specialist, Federal Railroad Administration MATT RAYMOND, President/CEO, Celtis Ventures, LLC SUSAN SHAHEEN, Associate Adjunct Professor and Co-Director, Transportation Sustainability Research Center, University of California, Berkeley JASON TESTER, Research Director, Human Future Interaction, Institute for the Future APTA LIAISON: DARNELL GRISBY, Director - Policy Development and Research, American Public Transportation Association OTHER LIAISON: LILLY SHOUP, Policy Analyst, Office of the Secretary, U.S. DOT TCRP STAFF: DIANNE S. SCHWAGER, Senior Program Officer, Transportation Research Board JEFFREY L. OSER, Senior Program Assistant, Transportation Research Board

CONTENTS Study Overview ......................................................................................................... 1 Mobility Option, Awareness, Engagement, Motivations, Barriers ............................ 11 Lifestyle Factors & Choices that Impact Mobility ..................................................... 23 Transportation Trends & Motivators ........................................................................ 38 Appendix ................................................................................................................. 52

Next: Study Overview »
Millennials and Mobility: Understanding the Millennial Mindset and New Opportunities for Transit Providers Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB’s Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Web-Only Document 61: Millennials and Mobility: Understanding the Millennial Mindset and New Opportunities for Transit Providers is designed to help public transit providers increase ridership by better understanding Millennials lifestyle and mobility decision-making processes.

A quantitative survey was used in the development of TCRP Web-Only Document 61. The survey focused on quantifying Millennials’ mobility motivations and behaviors. The final survey instrument and the survey data are available by clicking on the links below.

Millennials Mobility–Phase 2 Survey Instrument (.pdf)

Quant Data by Living Situation--Parental Status (.xlsx)

Quant Data by Market--Age Groups (.xlsx)

Quant Data by Millennial Hot Spot vs. Non (.xlsx)

Quant Open-Ended Responses (.xlsx)

Final Quant Dataset (.sav) (SPSS statistical analysis software is necessary to open)

Software Disclaimer - This software is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!