National Academies Press: OpenBook

Subsurface Utility Engineering Information for Airports (2012)

Chapter: Chapter Six - Research in Progress

« Previous: Chapter Five - Effective Practices
Page 31
Suggested Citation:"Chapter Six - Research in Progress." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Subsurface Utility Engineering Information for Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22751.
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Page 31
Page 32
Suggested Citation:"Chapter Six - Research in Progress." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Subsurface Utility Engineering Information for Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22751.
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Page 32

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31 The following research projects or programs currently under- way are related to or further support the information con- tained in this report. Asset And InfrAstructure MAnAgeMent for AIrports (Acrp 01-16) The objective of this ACRP project is to develop a document that will help airport managers and staff understands the com- ponents of an asset and infrastructure management program, as well as the costs and benefits of implementing one. The project will also provide a guidebook that will help airports of various sizes implement an asset and infrastructure man- agement program that meets their needs. ACRP 01-16 and this project (i.e., ACRP S11-09-03) can be complimentary because many of the assets and infrastructure at an airport are related to utilities. evAluAtIng cMMs prActIces (Acrp AntIcIpAted project 09-05) The objective of this ACRP project is to help airports select, operate, and support CMMS. The guidance developed will help airports understand the various products and options that exist, determine the appropriate level of sophistication for their specific needs, and apply the technology in the best manner possible for the airport. Because utilities are one of the primary types of assets at airports that require mainte- nance, the findings of this report will identify CMMS-related gaps between the state of the technology and current state of the practice. fAA nAtIonAl AIrspAce systeM enterprIse ArchItecture The purpose of the FAA’s NAS Enterprise Architecture (EA) is to increase the understanding of and provide a basis for modeling the evolution of the NAS. It will provide architec- ture information to support enterprise-level decision mak- ing about the NAS. The EA seeks to describe NAS-wide as well as program-specific elements using the Department of Defense Architecture Framework. Utilities infrastructure is an important component of the NAS. Accordingly, the NAS EA represents an opportunity to promote SUE best practices among airports and off-airport utilities that serve the NAS. MAppIng the underworld Mapping the Underworld (MTU) is a 10-year U.K. research program largely funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. MTU started in 2005 with four complimentary research projects covering the feasibilities of a multi-sensor location tool; mapping and position; data integration to yield a single repository for records; and RFID tags to assist future pipe location. The current project builds on this research by seeking to develop a multi-sensor device integrated with intelligent data fusion using GPR, acoustics, and electromagnetic technologies to locate all infrastructure in all ground conditions without the need for excavation. It is a multi-disciplinary and multi-university research project bringing together experienced researchers with a range of different expertise. The project builds directly on the findings of the MTU Phase 1 feasibility study, which con- cluded that only the combination of the different technolo- gies will allow for reliable detection of the buried assets and has the potential to be used for condition assessment. strAtegIc hIghwAy reseArch progrAM (shrp) r-01A: InnovAtIon In technologIes to support the storAge, retrIevAl, And utIlIzAtIon of 3d utIlIty locAtIon dAtA In hIghwAy renewAl This project aims to identify and develop best practices for modeling, structuring, storing, retrieving and utilizing 3D utility location data. Its main goals are to reduce project delays by keeping utility mapping data current throughout the proj- ect development process, reduce the necessity for repeating complete utility mapping for the next project in the same area by tracking all utility-related changes, and reduce excavation damage to utility lines during the construction phase. strAtegIc hIghwAy reseArch progrAM (shrp) r-01B: MultI-sensor plAtforMs for utIlIty locAtIon & chArActerIzAtIon This project seeks to modify and improve existing advanced GPR and EM equipment, and add the capabilities of a new type of elastic wave system based on seismic reflection and refraction techniques. The goal is to enable these instruments to work together to gather dense data sets that can interpret chapter six reseArch In progress

32 utility signatures better than each instrument separately. Con- tinuous precise positioning during data collection is of para- mount importance to allow these data sets to be stacked and aggregated. It is hoped that these data sets will be rich enough to be able to determine other characteristics of a utility beyond location. These new tools may have the ability to also measure characteristics of pavement, sub-base material, voids, depth to water table, and other geotechnical considerations. strAtegIc hIghwAy reseArch progrAM (shrp) r-01c: expAndIng the locAtABle zone for underground utIlItIes This project is attempting to develop technology to address two specific utility detection issues, that of deep utilities beyond the capabilities of current instrumentation, and of util- ities that are stacked underneath shallower ones that “hide” their presence. Technologies include seismic reflection, long- range smart tags (RFID), and electromagnetic and acoustic. excAvAtIon encroAchMent notIfIcAtIon (een) systeM This project is under research and development, with the Gas Technology Institute in the lead role. The objective is to develop a system that utilizes GPS technology to pre- vent excavator encroachment. Most research and develop- ment efforts to reduce excavation damage have focused on accurately locating the pipe or detecting damage once it has occurred. Relatively limited technology development has been aimed at preventing the two primary causes of excava- tion damage—excavators that do not utilize the One-Call cen- ter and excavators that encroach upon locator markings. Two separate but related systems will be developed to notify util- ity companies of encroachment. The first system, One-Call Monitoring System, will be developed to monitor construc- tion activity to ensure that all excavations have a valid One- Call ticket associated with the work being performed. This will be accomplished by attaching a GPS-enabled monitor onto excavation equipment. This monitor will periodically send location information from the excavation equipment to the One-Call center where it will be cross-referenced with existing tickets. If excavation activity is detected that does not have a valid One-Call ticket, an inspector will be sent to the site to investigate the reasons. The second system (an Encroach- ment Monitoring System) will be developed to ensure that excavation equipment does not get within the tolerance zone of markings. This will be accomplished by equipping facil- ity locators with high-accuracy GPS equipment to record the precise location of mark-outs. This information will then be used to ensure that the excavation equipment does not get within the tolerance zone of the markings. Additionally, excavators can be continuously aware of their proximity to underground facilities, even if markings have been removed.

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TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Synthesis 34: Subsurface Utility Engineering Information for Airports examines ways in which information on subsurface utilities is collected, maintained, and used by airports, their consultants, and the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration to help increase the effectiveness of, and enhance safety during, infrastructure development programs at airports.

The report also compares the current state of technology and effective processes from other industry sectors with what airports do today.

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