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Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports (2010)

Chapter: Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Inventory of Airport APM Systems." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

154 This chapter provides an inventory of existing airport APMs. The inventory of APMs at airports changes rapidly as new airports implement their first APM and other airports expand their existing system or add a second or third APM to their facility. The inventory describes the existing airport APMs in their current state. The data included in this report were collected through February 2010. Many systems have expanded signif- icantly since their opening date. Expansions have taken the form of longer trains, more trains, longer alignments, changes to operating configuration, and combinations thereof. Given the dynamic nature of existing airport APMs and new systems expected to open in the near future, this inventory will quickly become out of date. Detailed information is provided for the 44 current airport APMs. Data was collected from many sources and may not be fully comparable in all cases. Information is provided for each airport APM application for a wide range of institutional and operation environments. The definition for each of these areas is provided below. Inventory Definitions City/country—The city and country in which the APM system is located. Airport/airport code—The name of the airport where the APM system is located and the three-letter IATA air- port code. System name—The name of the APM system. Role—The role that the APM system plays at the airport. Examples include the type of passenger (airside, land- side, international, etc.) conveyed by the system or major activity centers that the system connects such as park- ing garages, consolidated rental car facilities, regional rail, airport terminal buildings, and satellite terminal buildings. Benefit—The benefit realized by the airport as a result of having the APM system. Impact on MAP—The impact that the APM system has on the airport’s total number of passengers as mea- sured by MAP. An airport APM system can have a pos- itive impact on the number of transfer passengers if not the number of O&D passengers. Alternately, an air- port APM system may have no impact on transfer and/ or O&D passengers. The impact of the APM system on transfer and O&D passengers is related to factors such as whether it is located airside or landside and if it con- nects to other terminals, remote parking, regional rail, and so on. Impact on trip time—The impact that the APM system has on passenger trip times. An airport APM system can have a positive impact on a passenger’s trip time by shortening its duration. An APM system can have a pos- itive impact on transfer passenger trip times and/or O&D passenger trip times. For some passengers, an airport APM system may have no impact on transfer and/or O&D passenger trip times. The impact of the APM sys- tem on transfer and O&D passenger trip times is related to factors such as whether it is located airside or landside and if it connects to other terminals, remote parking, regional rail, and so on. Operating entity—The name of the organization that operates the APM. It is typical for airport owners to con- tract out the O&M of the system to another organiza- tion, often the APM system supplier. In service year—The year that the APM system started operation. Supplier—The manufacturer of the APM operating system. Model—The model name of the APM vehicles. System operating configuration—The configuration of the guideway and how the vehicles navigate it. Examples include single-lane shuttle, single-lane shuttle with bypass, A P P E N D I X B Inventory of Airport APM Systems

dual-lane shuttle, dual-lane shuttle with bypass, single-lane loop, dual-lane loop, and pinched loop. See Section 4.2 for a detailed description of the operating configuration alternatives. This also includes elevation type, which would fall under one of the three categories of elevated, at grade, or underground. Guideway length—The length of the guideway, typically measured in units of dual-lane guideway miles. For example, if a dual-lane shuttle as in the exhibit above is 1.5 miles from end to end, this could be represented as 1.5 miles of dual-lane guideway, not 3.0 miles of single- lane guideway. The guideway lengths are only the oper- ating lengths and do not include portions that extend to maintenance facilities. Vehicles per train—The number of vehicles coupled together to form a train, also known as the consist. This can vary at an application over time (even within a day) but is intended to represent the train size most often used by the airport. A car is the smallest individual unit but is not able to operate on its own. A vehicle is the smallest individual unit that can operate on its own. A train is composed of cars and/or vehicles. Fleet size—The total number of vehicles in the APM system, including spares. Propulsion—The method used by the system to move the vehicles on the guideway. All of the systems currently employed at airports are electrically powered. Control system—The system and/or software used by the APM for automatic, driverless operation. Peak hour capacity—The maximum number of passen- gers that the APM system can transport in one direction in the busiest hour of service. This number (pphpd) is a function of the available vehicle floor area, the passen- ger loading density, and the APM train frequency or headway. Peak hour headway—The time between successive train arrivals (same guideway) at a station during peak hour operations. Comments—Additional comments regarding past replace- ments, current status, or future extension of the APM system A system photo and alignment graphic is provided for each APM. These photos and graphical images were obtained from a range of sources including supplier and airport websites, APM conference papers and brochures, Wikipedia, and pre- vious Lea+Elliott projects. References for all photos and align- ment graphics are provided at the end of this appendix. 155

Atlanta Airside City/Country: Atlanta/USA Airport/Airport Code: Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport/ATL System Name: Concourse People Mover Role: Airside conveyance, between main terminal and satellite concourses Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Bombardier Transportation In Service Year: 1980 Supplier: Bombardier Model: CX-100 System Operating Configuration: Pinched loop, underground Guideway Length: 1.0 mile (1.6 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Four Fleet Size: Twelve four-vehicle trains with one extra vehicle Propulsion: DC traction motors, 600 Vac supply guideway-mounted power rail Control System: Automated, relay-based fixed block Peak Hour Capacity: 10,000 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 1.8 minutes Comments: Since opening in 1980, the Atlanta system has seen fleet expansions from 12 to 49 vehicles, alignment extensions, MSF relocation and expansion, and two generations of replacement vehicles. An additional project is currently under implementation to extend the east Concourse F and is expected to be operating by 2012. APM 156

Atlanta Landside City/Country: Atlanta/USA Airport/Airport Code: Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport/ATL System Name: Consolidated Rental Agency Complex (CONRAC) Role: Landside conveyance between rental car facility and passenger terminal Benefit: Reduces airport roadway congestion, connects airport terminals to adjacent commercial property Impact on MAP: Positive impact on O&D MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Mitsubishi In Service Year: 2009 Supplier: Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Model: Crystal Mover System Operating Configuration: Pinched loop, elevated Guideway Length: 1.4 mile (2.3 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Two Fleet Size: Six two-vehicle trains Propulsion: VVVF inverter vector control Control System: Automated, microprocessor-based fixed block Peak Hour Capacity: 2,700 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 2.0 minutes 157

Beijing Airside City/Country: Beijing/China Airport/Airport Code: Beijing Capital International Airport/PEK System Name: Automated People Mover System Role: Airside conveyance, connects Terminals 3A, 3B, and 3C Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time Operating Entity: Bombardier Transportation In Service Year: 2008 Supplier: Bombardier Model: CX-100 System Operating Configuration: Pinched loop, at grade Guideway Length: 1.2 miles (2.0 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Two Fleet Size: Five two-vehicle trains with one extra vehicle Propulsion: DC traction motors, 600 Vac supply guideway-mounted power rail Control System: CITYFLO 550 microprocessor-based fixed block Peak Hour Capacity: 4,100 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 5.0 minutes APM T-3C T-3D T-3E 158

Beijing Landside City/Country: Beijing/China Airport/Airport Code: Beijing Capital International Airport/PEK System Name: Airport Express Train Role: Landside conveyance, connects Beijing’s urban center with the international airport’s Terminals 2 and 3 Benefit: Impact on MAP: Positive impact on O&D MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Beijing Mass Transit Railway Operation Corporation In Service Year: 2008 Supplier: Bombardier Model: MK II System Operating Configuration: Pinched loop, elevated Guideway Length: 17.5 miles (28.1 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Four Fleet Size: Ten four-vehicle trains Propulsion: 750 Vdc; third rail, linear induction motor Control System: Automated, communication-based train-control system Peak Hour Capacity: 3,780 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 4.0 minutes APM 159

Birmingham City/Country: Birmingham/United Kingdom Airport/Airport Code: Birmingham International Airport/BHX System Name: Air-Rail Link Role: Landside conveyance, connect airport terminal to nearby regional rail and exhibition center Benefit: Reduces O&D parking demand and airport roadway congestion Impact on MAP: No impact on airport MAP Impact on Trip Time: No impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: DCC Doppelmayr In Service Year: 2003 Supplier: DCC Doppelmayr Model: Cable Liner Shuttle System Operating Configuration: Dual-lane shuttle, elevated Guideway Length: 0.4 miles (0.6 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Two Fleet Size: Two two-vehicle trains Propulsion: Cable-propelled, 415 Volts, 50 Hertz Control System: Fully automated, based on a fail-safe programmable logic controller (PLC) technology Peak Hour Capacity: 1,608 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 2.0 minutes Comments: Replaced a previous low-speed maglev system. The original guideway columns and beams were kept; the separate DCC guideway structure is supported on the existing columns. APM 160

Chicago City/Country: Chicago/USA Airport/Airport Code: Chicago O'Hare International Airport/ORD System Name: Airport Transit System (ATS) Role: Landside conveyance, connects three domestic terminals, international terminal, long-term parking. Access to CTA Station via walking and to PACE stop via shuttle bus Benefit: Reduces O&D parking demand and airport roadway congestion Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: O’Hare Airport Transit System (OATS) In Service Year: 1993 Supplier: Siemens Model: VAL 256 System Operating Configuration: Dual lane, pinched loop, primarily elevated Guideway Length: 2.7 miles (4.3 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: One to three Fleet Size: 15 vehicles Propulsion: Rotary, electric, 750 Vdc, traction motors Control System: Automated, fixed-block Peak Hour Capacity: 2,400 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 3.0 minutes APM 161

Cincinnati City/Country: Cincinnati/USA Airport/Airport Code: Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport/CVG System Name: Concourse Train Role: Airside conveyance, connects Terminal 3 to Satellite Concourses A & B Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Otis In Service Year: 1994 Supplier: Poma-Otis Model: Hovair System Operating Configuration: Dual-lane shuttle, underground Guideway Length: 0.2 miles (0.4 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Three Fleet Size: Two three-vehicle trains Propulsion: Cable-propelled, DC motors Control System: Fully automated, based on a fail-safe PLC technology Peak Hour Capacity: 5,700 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 2.2 minutes 162

Dallas/Fort Worth City/Country: Dallas/Fort Worth/USA Airport/Airport Code: Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport/DFW System Name: Skylink Role: Airside conveyance, moves transfer passengers between terminals Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, no impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Bombardier Transportation In Service Year: 2005 Supplier: Bombardier Model: Innovia System Operating Configuration: Bi-directional, dual-lane loop, elevated Guideway Length: 4.9 miles (7.9 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Two Fleet Size: 32 two-vehicle trains (64 vehicles) Propulsion: AC traction motors, 750 Vdc supply, guideway-mounted power rail Control System: CITYFLO 650 moving block automated train control Peak Hour Capacity: 5,000 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 2.0 minutes Comment: Replaced the original Airtrans APM system. APM 163

Denver City/Country: Denver/USA Airport/Airport Code: Denver International Airport/DEN System Name: Automated Guideway Transit System (AGTS) Role: Airside conveyance, main terminal to/from satellite concourses A, B, & C Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Bombardier Transportation In Service Year: 1995 Supplier: Bombardier Model: CX-100 System Operating Configuration: Pinched loop, underground Guideway Length: 1.2 miles (1.9 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Four Fleet Size: Seven four-vehicle trains with three extra vehicles Propulsion: DC traction motors, 600 Vac supply guideway-mounted power rail Control System: Automated, relay-based fixed block Peak Hour Capacity: 8,300 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 2.0 minutes Comments: Since the AGTS system opened in 1995 it has expanded from 16 vehicles to the current 31 vehicles. Main Terminal Concourse A Concourse B Concourse C Maintenance Facility 164

Detroit City/Country: Detroit/USA Airport/Airport Code: Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport/DTW System Name: Express Tram Role: Airside conveyance, moves passengers within McNamara terminal Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Otis In Service Year: 2002 Supplier: Poma-Otis Model: 8-door, 54’ vehicles, Hovair ®, System Operating Configuration: Single-lane shuttle with bypass, elevated Guideway Length: 0.7 miles (1.1 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Two Fleet Size: Two two-vehicle trains Propulsion: Cable-propelled, DC motors Control System: Fully automated, based on a fail-safe PLC technology Peak Hour Capacity: 4,000 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 3.2 minutes 165

Düsseldorf City/Country: Düsseldorf/Germany Airport/Airport Code: Düsseldorf International Airport/DUS System Name: Skytrain (Suspended Monorail) Role: Landside conveyance, connects the main terminal to the car park and rail station Benefit: Reduces O&D parking demand and airport roadway congestion Impact on MAP: No impact on airport MAP Impact on Trip Time: No impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Flughafen Düsseldorf GmbH In Service Year: 2002 Supplier: Siemens Model: H-Bahn System Operating Configuration: Pinched loop, elevated Guideway Length: 1.6 miles (2.5 km), dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Two Fleet Size: Six two-vehicle trains Propulsion: Conventional rotary motors Control System: Automated, moving block system Peak Hour Capacity: 2,000 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 5.0 minutes APM 166

Frankfurt City/Country: Frankfurt/Germany Airport/Airport Code: Frankfurt Airport/FRA System Name: Sky Line Role: Airside conveyance, transports passengers between Concourses A-D and the Main Terminal Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Bombardier Transportation In Service Year: 1994 Supplier: Bombardier Model: CX-100 System Operating Configuration: Pinched loop, elevated Guideway Length: 1.0 miles (1.6 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Two Fleet Size: Nine two-vehicle trains Propulsion: DC traction motors, 600 Vac supply guideway-mounted power rail Control System: CITYFLO 550 microprocessor-based fixed block Peak Hour Capacity: 4,500 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 2.0 – 3.0 minutes 167

Hong Kong City/Country: Hong Kong/China Airport/Airport Code: Hong Kong International Airport/HKG System Name: The shuttle Role: Airside conveyance, transports passengers whose flights are located at the West Hall, Southwest and Northwest concourses Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Mass Transit Rail (MTR) In Service Year: T1 (PTB) line – 1998, T2 (SkyPlaza) line – 2008 Supplier: Sumitomo/Mitsubishi (initial T1 system) and IHI/Niigata (T2 line) Model: T1 – Crystal Mover, T2 – Japanese standard technology System Operating Configuration: T1 – Pinched loop, underground, T2 – Dual-lane shuttle, underground Guideway Length: T1 – 0.4 miles (0.6 km) dual-lane guideway, T2 – 0.4 miles (0.6 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Four and two Fleet Size: 28 vehicles; five four-vehicle trains and four two-vehicle trains Propulsion: VVVF inverter vector control Control System: Automated, fixed block Peak Hour Capacity: T1 – 6,000 pphpd, T2 – 3000 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: T1 – 2.0 minutes, T2 – 4.5 minutes Comments: A new extension of the T2 (SkyPlaza) line called “SkyPier” is now under construction and due to be completed in 2009. T1 APM T2 APM 168

Houston Airside City / Country: Houston / USA Airport / Airport Code: George Bush Intercontinental Airport / IAH System Name: TerminaLink Role: Airside conveyance , transports passengers between terminals and FIS Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Johnson Controls , Inc. (SDI) In Service Year: 1999 Phase 1, 2005 Phase 2, 2010 Phase 3 Supplier: Bombardier Model: CX - 100 System Operating Configuration: Pinched loop, elevated Guideway Length: 1.0 miles (1. 6 km) dual - lane guideway (Phase 3) Vehicles Per Train: Two Fleet Size: Eight two - vehicle trains (Phase 3), Six two - vehicle trains in operation (Phase 3) Propulsion: DC traction motors, 600 Vac supply guideway - mounted power rail Control System: CITYFLO 550 m icroprocessor - based fixed block Peak Hour Capacity: 48 00 pphpd Phase 2, 5000 pphpd Phase 3 Peak Hour Headway: 1.85 minutes Comments: The system is being built in three phases, as shown on the system map below. The third phase is currently under construction and is expected to open in 20 10 . 169

Houston Landside City/Country: Houston/USA Airport/Airport Code: George Bush Intercontinental Airport/IAH System Name: Inter-Terminal Train Role: Landside conveyance, transports passengers between terminals, parking, and hotel Benefit: Reduces O&D parking demand and airport roadway congestion Impact on MAP: No impact on airport MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Johnson Controls, Inc. (JCI) In Service Year: 1981 Supplier: Bombardier (formerly TGI) Model: WEDway People Mover System Operating Configuration: Loop, underground Guideway Length: 2.0 miles (3.2 km) single-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Three Fleet Size: Eight three-vehicle trains, Six two-vehicle trains Propulsion: LIMs embedded in the track Control System: PLC fixed block control of wayside linear induction motors (passive vehicles) Peak Hour Capacity: 720 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 3.0 minutes 170

Kuala Lumpur City/Country: Selangor Darul Ehsan/Malaysia Airport/Airport Code: Kuala Lumpur International Airport/KUL System Name: Aerotrain Role: Airside conveyance, transports passengers from main terminal to satellite concourse Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Bombardier Transportation In Service Year: 1998 Supplier: Bombardier Model: CX-100 System Operating Configuration: Dual-lane shuttle, elevated and underground Guideway Length: 0.8 miles (1.3 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Two Fleet Size: Two two-vehicle trains Propulsion: DC traction motors, 600 Vac supply guideway-mounted power rail Control System: Fully automated, solid state Peak Hour Capacity: 3,000 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 3.0 minutes Comments: The system is currently being expanded to service a new terminal and is expected to be operating by 2011. Terminal Concourse APM 171

Las Vegas City/Country: Las Vegas/USA Airport/Airport Code: Las Vegas McCarran International Airport/LAS System Name: C Gates Tram, D Gates Tram Role: Airside conveyance Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: No impact on airport MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Bombardier Transportation In Service Year: C Gates – 1985, D Gates – 1998 Supplier: Bombardier Model: C/CX-100 System Operating Configuration: Dual-lane shuttles, elevated and tunnel Guideway Length: C Gates – 0.2 miles (0.4 km) dual-lane guideway, D Gates – 0.6 miles (1.0 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: C Gates: two; D Gates: three Fleet Size: 10 vehicles, two two-vehicle trains and two three-vehicle trains Propulsion: DC traction motors, 600 Vac supply guideway-mounted power rail Control System: Fully automated, solid state Peak Hour Capacity: C Gates - 7,200 pphpd, D Gates – 6,600 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: C Gates – 1.3 minutes, D Gates – 2.5 minutes Comments: A third airside shuttle (tunnel) system is currently being built by Bombardier to serve the E Gates (Terminal 3) and is expected to be operating in 2011, with two three-vehicle trains. APM 172

London Gatwick City/Country: West Sussex/United Kingdom Airport/Airport Code: London Gatwick Airport/LGW System Name: Gatwick Airport Transit Role: Landside conveyance, connects the north and south terminals to rail/bus/road Benefit: Enables the airport to process more transfer passengers and reduces congestion on the terminal roadways Impact on MAP: Positive impact on O&D MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Bombardier Transportation In Service Year: 1987 Supplier: Bombardier Model: C-100 System Operating Configuration: Dual-lane shuttle, elevated Guideway Length: 0.7 miles (1.2 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Three Fleet Size: Two three-vehicle trains Propulsion: DC traction motors, 600 Vac supply guideway-mounted power rail Control System: Fully automated, solid state Peak Hour Capacity: 4,200 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 2.6 minutes Comments: Plans for system replacement are currently underway. APM 173

London Heathrow City/Country: Middlesex/United Kingdom Airport/Airport Code: London Heathrow Airport/LHR System Name: Tracked Transit System (TTS) Role: Airside conveyance Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Bombardier Transportation In Service Year: 2008 Supplier: Bombardier Model: Innovia System Operating Configuration: Dual-lane shuttle, underground Guideway Length: 0.4 miles (0.7 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Three Fleet Size: Two three-vehicle trains Propulsion: DC traction motors, 600 Vac supply guideway-mounted power rail Control System: CITYFLO 650 moving block automated train control Peak Hour Capacity: 6,500 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 1.5 minutes APM 174

London Stansted City/Country: Essex/United Kingdom Airport/Airport Code: London Stansted Airport/STN System Name: Airport Transit System Role: Airside conveyance Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Bombardier Transportation In Service Year: 1991 Supplier: Bombardier Model: C/CX-100 System Operating Configuration: Pinched loop, elevated and underground Guideway Length: 0.4 miles (0.6 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Two Fleet Size: Four two-vehicle trains with one extra vehicle Propulsion: DC traction motors, 600 Vac supply guideway-mounted power rail Control System: Automated, relay-based fixed block Peak Hour Capacity: 3,200 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 3.0 minutes APM 175

Madrid City/Country: Madrid/Spain Airport/Airport Code: Madrid Barajas Airport/MAD System Name: Unknown Role: Airside conveyance, transports passengers between the new terminal (T4) and the new satellite terminal (T4S) Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Bombardier Transportation In Service Year: 2006 Supplier: Bombardier Model: CX-100 System Operating Configuration: Pinched loop, underground Guideway Length: 1.4 miles (2.2 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Three initially, expandable to four Fleet Size: Six three-vehicle trains with one extra vehicle Propulsion: DC traction motors, 600 Vac supply guideway-mounted power rail Control System: CITYFLO 550 microprocessor-based fixed block Peak Hour Capacity: 6,500 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 2.0 minutes 176

Mexico City City/Country: Mexico City/Mexico Airport/Airport Code: Mexico City Benito Juarez International Airport/MEX System Name: Aerotrén Role: Connects Terminal 1 to Terminal 2 Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP, positive impact on O&D MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: DCC Doppelmayr Car S.A. de C.V. In Service Year: 2007 (system completed testing, ridership to begin when Terminal 2 opens) Supplier: DCC Doppelmayr Model: Cable Liner Shuttle System Operating Configuration: Single-lane, elevated Guideway Length: 1.9 miles (3.0 km) single-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Four Fleet Size: One four-vehicle train Propulsion: Cable-propelled, 600 Volts; 60 Hertz Control System: Fully automated, based on fail-safe PLC technology Peak Hour Capacity: 540 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 11.2 minutes 177

Miami City/Country: Miami/USA Airport/Airport Code: Miami International Airport/MIA System Name: Concourse E shuttle Role: Airside conveyance, connects main terminal to satellite international terminal Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Johnson Controls In Service Year: 1980 Supplier: Bombardier Model: C-100 System Operating Configuration: Dual-lane shuttle, elevated Guideway Length: 0.2 miles (0.3 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Three Fleet Size: Two three-vehicle trains Propulsion: DC traction motors, 480 Vac supply guideway-mounted power rail Control System: Fully automated, solid state Peak Hour Capacity: 6,750 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 2.0 minutes Comments: One lane of the dual-lane shuttle is out of service (2009) and will be replaced. APM 178

Minneapolis/St. Paul Airside City/Country: Minneapolis/USA Airport/Airport Code: Minneapolis/St. Paul International Airport/MSP System Name: Concourse Tram Role: Airside conveyance, connects the Lindbergh Main Terminal and concourses A and B, moves passengers within concourse C Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Schwager Davis, Inc. (SDI) In Service Year: 2004 Supplier: Poma-Otis Model: Poma 2000, 4-door, 30’ vehicles, steel wheel on steel rail System Operating Configuration: Pinched loop, elevated Guideway Length: 0.5 miles (0.8 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Two Fleet Size: Two two-vehicle trains Propulsion: Cable-propelled Control System: Automatic, PLC control of cable drive Peak Hour Capacity: 1,700 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 3.1 minutes 179

Minneapolis/St. Paul Landside City/Country: Minneapolis/USA Airport/Airport Code: Minneapolis/St. Paul International Airport/MSP System Name: HubTram Role: Landside conveyance, connects the terminal to car rental, transit center, light rail station, parking and the Skyway Connector moving walkway Benefit: Reduces O&D parking demand and airport roadway congestion Impact on MAP: No impact on airport MAP Impact on Trip Time: No impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Schwager Davis, Inc. (SDI) In Service Year: 2001 Supplier: Poma-Otis Model: 6-door, 42’ vehicles, Hovair ® System Operating Configuration: Dual-lane shuttle, underground Guideway Length: 0.2 miles (0.4 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Two Fleet Size: Two two-vehicle trains Propulsion: Cable-propelled, electric Control System: Automatic, PLC control of cable drive Peak Hour Capacity: 5,200 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 1.4 minutes 180

New York–JFK City/Country: Jamaica/USA Airport/Airport Code: New York–John F. Kennedy International Airport/JFK System Name: AirTrain JFK Role: Landside conveyance, connects 10 elevated stations and links all terminals with two branches that interface with New York’s regional transit systems Benefit: Reduces O&D parking demand and airport roadway congestion Impact on MAP: Positive impact on O&D MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Bombardier Transportation In Service Year: 2003 Supplier: Bombardier Model: Advanced Rapid Transit (ART) MkII System Operating Configuration: Pinched loop, primarily elevated Guideway Length: 8.1 miles (13.0 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: One on CTA, two on Jamaica and Howard Beach Fleet Size: 32 vehicles Propulsion: 750 Vdc; third rail, LIM Control System: Automated, Seltrac communication-based moving block train control Peak Hour Capacity: CTA Loop: 3780 pphpd; Jamaica: 3780 pphpd; Howard Beach: 3780 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: CTA Loop: 2.0 minutes: Jamaica and Howard Beach: 4.0 minutes 181

Newark City/Country: Newark/USA Airport/Airport Code: Newark Liberty International Airport/EWR System Name: AirTrain Newark Role: Landside conveyance, connects terminals A, B, and C to car park (short and long term), car rental, and regional rail station Benefit: Reduces O&D parking demand and airport roadway congestion Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP, positive impact on O&D MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Bombardier Transportation In Service Year: 1996 Supplier: Bombardier Model: Type IIIa Monorail System Operating Configuration: Pinched loop, elevated Guideway Length: 3.2 miles (5.1 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Six Fleet Size: 14 six-vehicle trains Propulsion: Traction motors, guideway mounted power rail Control System: Microprocessor-based fixed block SELTrac-FB in which the vehicle has a digital map of the track layout Peak Hour Capacity: 2,100 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 2.1 minutes Comments: System opened in 1996 and was extended 1.1 miles in 2001 to connect with a regional rail intermodal station. APM 182

Orlando City/Country: Orlando/USA Airport/Airport Code: Orlando International Airport/MCO System Name: Automated People Mover System Role: Airside conveyance Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: No impact on airport MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Bombardier Transportation In Service Year: 1981 (Airsides 1 & 3) Supplier: Bombardier Model: CX-100 System Operating Configuration: Four dual-lane shuttles, elevated Guideway Length: 1.5 miles (2.4 km) dual-lane guideway (combined length of four shuttles) Vehicles Per Train: Three Fleet Size: Eight three-vehicle trains Propulsion: DC traction motors, 600 Vac supply guideway-mounted power rail Control System: Fully automated, solid state Peak Hour Capacity: 6,000 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 2.1 minutes Comments: The airport has plans to implement an additional APM to connect the existing terminal with a future South Terminal Complex. Approximately half of the 8,000-foot elevated guideway structure has been constructed. This structure was designed to be compatible with multiple APM supplier technologies. APMs 183

Osaka Kansai City/Country: Osaka/Japan Airport/Airport Code: Kansai International Airport/KIX System Name: Wing Shuttle Role: Airside conveyance, transports international passengers from main terminal to gates Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Kansai International Airport In Service Year: 1994 Supplier: Niigata/Kawasaki Model: Japanese standard technology System Operating Configuration: Four single-lane shuttles with bypasses, elevated Guideway Length: 1.4 miles (2.2 km) single-lane guideway with four bypasses Vehicles Per Train: Three Fleet Size: Nine three-vehicle trains Propulsion: 600 Vac traction motors, guideway-mounted power rail Control System: Automated, microprocessor-based fixed block Peak Hour Capacity: 14,400 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 2.0–2.5 minutes APMs 184

Paris–CDG Airside City/Country: Roissy Charles de Gaulle/France Airport/Airport Code: Paris Roissy Charles de Gaulle Airport/CDG System Name: LISA Role: Airside conveyance, links Terminal 2E and Satellite S3 Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Aérosat, a joint subsidiary of Keolis and Siemens TS In Service Year: 2007 Supplier: Siemens Model: VAL 208 System Operating Configuration: Shuttle, underground Guideway Length: 0.4 miles (0.6 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Two Fleet Size: Three two-vehicle trains Propulsion: Electric traction motors Control System: Automated, fixed block Peak Hour Capacity: 4,500 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 2.0 minutes Airside APM 185

Paris–CDG Landside City/Country: Roissy Charles de Gaulle/France Airport/Airport Code: Paris Roissy Charles de Gaulle Airport/CDG System Name: CDGVAL Role: Landside conveyance, links the three airport terminals, remote parking, high- speed train station and the commuter rail station serving Paris Benefit: Reduces O&D parking demand and airport roadway congestion Impact on MAP: Positive impact on O&D MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Aérosat, a joint subsidiary of Keolis and Siemens TS In Service Year: 2007 Supplier: Siemens Model: VAL 208 System Operating Configuration: Pinched loop, elevated Guideway Length: 2.1 miles (3.3 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Two Fleet Size: Seven two-vehicle trains Propulsion: Electric traction motors Control System: Automated, fixed block Peak Hour Capacity: 1,900 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 4.0 minutes Landside APM 186

Paris–Orly City / Country: Orly Aérogare / France Airport / Airport Code: Paris Orly Airport / ORY System Name: OrlyVal Role: Landside system connects the s outh and w est terminals to the Antony station of RER B line Benefit: Reduces O&D parking demand and airport roadway congestion Impact on MAP: Positive impact on O&D MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: RATP In Service Year: 1991 Supplier: Siemens Model: VAL 206 System Operating Configuration: Elevated and underground Guideway Length: 4.5 miles (7.3 km) dual - lane guideway Vehicles Per Train : Two Fleet Size: Eight two - vehicle trains Propulsion: VDC Electric Traction Motors Control System: Automated, Fixed Block Peak Hour Capacity: 1,500 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 4.0 minutes APM 187

Pittsburgh City/Country: Pittsburgh/USA Airport/Airport Code: Pittsburgh International Airport/PIT System Name: People Mover Role: Airside conveyance Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Bombardier Transportation In Service Year: 1992 Supplier: Bombardier Model: CX-100 System Operating Configuration: Dual-lane shuttle, underground Guideway Length: 0.4 miles (0.7 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Three Fleet Size: Two three-vehicle trains Propulsion: DC traction motors, 600 Vac supply guideway-mounted power rail Control System: Fully automated, solid state Peak Hour Capacity: 8,500 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 1.6 minutes APM 188

Rome Leonardo da Vinci City / Country: Fiumicino / Italy Airport / Airport Code: Rome Leonardo da Vinci Fiumicino Airport / FCO System Name: SkyBridge Role: Airside conveyance, connects the international satellite terminal to Terminal C Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Bombardier Transportation In Service Year: 1999 Supplier: Bombardier Model: CX - 100 System Operating Configuration: Dual - lane shuttle, elevated, able to be converted to pinched loop Guideway Length: 0.4 miles ( 0.6 km) dual - lane guideway Vehicles Per Train : Two Fleet Size: Two two - vehicle trains Propulsion: DC traction motors, 600 Vac supply guideway - mounted power rail Control System: CITYFLO 550 m icroprocessor - based fixed block Peak Hour Capacity: 5,300 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 1 .7 minutes APM 189

San Francisco City/Country: San Francisco/USA Airport/Airport Code: San Francisco International Airport/SFO System Name: AirTrain Role: Landside conveyance, connects terminal to car hire and remote and daily parking and the BART regional rail system Benefit: Reduces O&D parking demand and airport roadway congestion Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP, positive impact on O&D MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Bombardier Transportation In Service Year: 2003 Supplier: Bombardier Model: CX-100 System Operating Configuration: Two independent single-lane loops, elevated Guideway Length: 2.8 miles (4.5 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Three Fleet Size: 38 vehicles Propulsion: DC traction motors, 600 Vac supply guideway-mounted power rail Control System: CITYFLO 650 moving block automated train control Peak Hour Capacity: 3,400 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 2.5 minutes APM 190

Seattle City / Country: Seattle / USA Airport / Airport Code: Seattle – Tacoma International Airport / SEA System Name: Satellite Transit System (STS) Role: Airside conveyance, connects main terminal to two satellite concourses and two other concourses Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Port of Seattle In Service Year: 1973, replaced in 2004 Supplier: Bombardier Model: C - 100, STS - 100 (modified, shortened CX - 100) System Operating Configuration: Two loops and one shuttle, underground Guideway Length: 1.7 miles (2.7 km) Vehicles Per Train : Three on loop routes, one on shuttle routes Fleet Size: 21 vehicle s Propulsion: DC traction motors, 600 Vac supply guideway - mounted power rail Control System: CITYFLO 650 moving block automated train control Peak Hour Capacity: North Loop: 7,500 pphpd South Loop: 7,500 pphpd North/South Shuttle: 1,200 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: North Loop: 1.7 minutes South Loop: 1.7 minutes North/South Shuttle: 2.0 minutes Comments: North and s outh loops a re normally operated with two three - vehicle trains to avoid trains stopping outside the station in the event the train ahead is delayed for any reason. APM 191

Seoul City/Country: Seoul/South Korea Airport/Airport Code: Incheon International Airport/IIA System Name: Intra Airport Transit System (IAT) “Starline” Role: Airside conveyance, transports passengers between Terminal 1 and Concourse A Benefit: Allows airport to operate with significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Airport In Service Year: 2008 Supplier: Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Model: Crystal Mover System Operating Configuration: Dual-lane shuttle, underground Guideway Length: 0.6 miles (0.9 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Three Fleet Size: Three three-vehicle trains Propulsion: VVVF inverter vector control Control System: Automated, microprocessor-based fixed block Peak Hour Capacity: 5,184 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 2.5 minutes APM 192

Singapore Changi City/Country: Singapore Airport/Airport Code: Singapore Changi Airport/SIN System Name: Skytrain Role: Airside and landside conveyance, interconnects terminals T1, T2, and T3 Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates and reduces O&D parking demand and airport roadway congestion Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Mitsubishi In Service Year: 2006 Supplier: Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Model: Crystal Mover System Operating Configuration: Seven shuttles – single-lane shuttles (two airside, two landside), dual-lane shuttles (one airside) and bypass shuttles (one airside, one airside/landside combo) (elevated) Guideway Length: 1.5 miles dual-lane guideway (combined equivalent) Vehicles Per Train: One and two Fleet Size: 16 vehicles Propulsion: VVVF inverter vector control Control System: Automated, microprocessor-based fixed block Peak Hour Capacity: A-A: 2,077; A-F: 1,117 pphpd; B-C Airside: 982 pphpd; B-C Landside: 926 pphpd; B-E Airside/Landside: 1,940 pphpd; D-E Airside: 953 pphpd; D-E Landside: 771 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: A-A: 1.3 minutes; A-F: 2.4 minutes; B-C Airside: 2.75 minutes; B-C Landside: 2.9 minutes; B-E Airside/Landside: 2.8 minutes; D-E Airside: 2.8 minutes; D-E Landside: 3.5 minutes Comments: Replaced the original T1-T2 Bombardier C-100 airside/landside shuttles plus added T1-T3 and T2-T3 shuttles. APMs APMs 193

Taipei City/Country: Taipei/Taiwan, Republic of China Airport/Airport Code: Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport/TPE System Name: Skytrain Role: Transports secure and non-secure passengers between Terminal 1 & 2 Benefit: Reduces O&D parking demand and airport roadway congestion and allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport In Service Year: 2003 Supplier: Niigata Model: New Transportation System (NTS) System Operating Configuration: Two dual-lane shuttles w/crossover, elevated Guideway Length: 0.8 miles (1.3 km) single-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: One and two Fleet Size: Six vehicles Propulsion: 600 Vac traction motors, guideway mounted power rail Control System: Automated, fixed block Peak Hour Capacity: 6,000 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 2.0 minutes APMs 194

Tampa Airside City/Country: Tampa/USA Airport/Airport Code: Tampa International Airport/TPA System Name: Airport People Mover Role: Airside conveyance, connects main terminal to four satellite terminals Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: No impact on airport MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Bombardier Transportation In Service Year: 1971 Supplier: Bombardier Model: C/CX-100 System Operating Configuration: Dual-lane shuttles, elevated Guideway Length: 0.7 miles (1.2 km) combined dual-lane guideways for legs A,C,E, & F Vehicles Per Train: Two Fleet Size: 16 vehicles Propulsion: DC traction motors, 600 Vac supply guideway-mounted power rail Control System: Fully automated, solid state Peak Hour Capacity: A: 5,745 pphpd; C: 6,429 pphpd; E: 7,013 pphpd; F: 6,207 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: A: 1.7 minutes; C: 1.4 minutes; E: 1.3 minutes; F: 1.5 minutes 195

Tampa Landside City/Country: Tampa/USA Airport/Airport Code: Tampa International Airport/TPA System Name: Garage Monorail Role: Landside conveyance, serves short- and long-term parking and car hire Benefit: Reduces O&D parking demand and airport roadway congestion Impact on MAP: No impact on airport MAP Impact on Trip Time: No impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Bombardier Transportation In Service Year: 1990 Supplier: Bombardier Model: UM-III monorail System Operating Configuration: Pinched loop, low profile guideway attached to garage floor Guideway Length: 0.6 miles (1 km) single-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: One Fleet Size: Six one-vehicle trains Propulsion: 480 Vac power, DC traction motors, guideway mounted power rail Control System: Automated, microprocessor-based fixed block Peak Hour Capacity: 700 pph Peak Hour Headway: 1.5 minutes APM 196

Tokyo Narita City/Country: Chiba/Japan Airport/Airport Code: Tokyo Narita Airport/NRT System Name: Terminal 2 Shuttle System Role: Airside conveyance, connects the main terminal to the satellite terminal Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Nippon Otis In Service Year: 1992 Supplier: Nippon Otis Elevator Model: Hovair System Operating Configuration: Two single-lane shuttles with bypasses, elevated Guideway Length: 0.2 miles (0.3 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: One Fleet Size: Four one-vehicle trains Propulsion: Cable-propelled, electric Control System: Power modulation in acceleration and braking, fully automated wayside control Peak Hour Capacity: 9,800 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 1.8 minutes APM 197

Toronto City/Country: Toronto/Canada Airport/Airport Code: Toronto Pearson International Airport/YYZ System Name: The LINK Role: Landside conveyance between Terminal 1, Terminal 3, airport hotel, parking, employee parking lot, and future connection to regional rail Benefit: Reduces airport roadway congestion, more reliable and cost-effective than bussing Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Doppelmayr GmbH In Service Year: 2006 Supplier: Doppelmayr GmbH Model: Cable Liner Shuttle System Operating Configuration: Dual-lane shuttle, elevated Guideway Length: 0.9 miles (1.5 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Six Fleet Size: Two six-vehicle trains Propulsion: Cable-propelled, 600 Volts; 60 Hertz (Siemens AC motors and Simovert drives) Control System: Fully automated, based on fail-safe PLC technology Peak Hour Capacity: 2,150 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 4.0 minutes Comments: A new 8,000-car garage will be opening near the APM’s Viscount station and will serve both airline passengers and airport employees. 198

Washington Dulles City / Country: Dulles / USA Airport / Airport Code: Washington Dulles International Airport / IAD System Name: AeroTrain APM System Role: Airside conveyance, connects m ain t erminal and two remote concourses Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating E ntity: Crystal Mover Services Inc. In Service Year: 20 10 Supplier: Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Model: Crystal Mover System Operating Configuration: P inched loop, underground Guideway Length: 1. 5 miles (2.3 km) dual - lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Three Fleet Size: 29 vehicles Propulsion: AC traction motors, 750 V dc power, guideway - mounted power rail Control System: Automatic Train Control System, SelTrac® by Thales Peak Hour Capacity: 6,755 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 2.0 minutes 199

Zurich City/Country: Zurich/Switzerland Airport/Airport Code: Zurich Airport/ZRH System Name: Skymetro Role: Airside conveyance, connects the main terminal to the satellite terminal Benefit: Allows airport to operate with a significantly larger number of gates Impact on MAP: Positive impact on transfer MAP Impact on Trip Time: Positive impact on transfer trip time, positive impact on O&D trip time Operating Entity: Otis In Service Year: 2003 Supplier: Poma-Otis Model: Hovair System Operating Configuration: Pinched loop, underground Guideway Length: 0.7 miles (1.1 km) dual-lane guideway Vehicles Per Train: Two Fleet Size: Three two-vehicle trains Propulsion: Cable-propelled, electric Control System: Fully automated, based on a fail-safe PLC technology Peak Hour Capacity: 4,500 pphpd Peak Hour Headway: 2.5 minutes Concourse Terminal 200

201 Image References 1. Atlanta Airside Image 1 (lower left): www.bombardier.com Image 2 (lower right): City of Atlanta Department of Aviation 2. Atlanta Landside Image 1: www.mhi.co.jp Image 2: City of Atlanta Department of Aviation 3. Beijing Airside Image 1 (lower left): www.bombardier.com Image 2 (lower right): Beijing Capital International Airport 4. Birmingham Image 1 (lower left): www.dcc.at/ Image 2 (lower right): Birmingham International Airport Ltd. 5. Chicago Image 1 (lower left): w1.siemens.com Image 2 (lower right): Chicago Airport System 6. Cincinnati Image 1( lower left): Otis Elevator Company Inc. Image 2 (lower right): Kenton County Airport Board 7. Dallas/Fort Worth Image 1 (lower left): www.bombardier.com Image 2 (lower right): DFW Airport Board 8. Denver Image 1 (lower left): www.bombardier.com Image 2 (lower right): City and County of Denver Department of Aviation 9. Detroit Image 1 (lower left): Otis Elevator Company Inc. Image 2 (lower right): Wayne County Airport Authority 10. Düsseldorf Image 1 (lower left): w1.siemens.com Image 2 (lower right): Flughafen Düsseldorf GmbH 11. Frankfurt Image 1 (lower left): www.bombardier.com Image 2(lower right): Bombardier C-100 and CX-100 System Data Sheets.pdf 12. Hong Kong Image 1 (lower left): IHI Niigata 10012_6.pdf Image 2 (lower right): Airport Authority Hong Kong 13. Houston Airside Image 1 (lower left): Bombardier C-100 CX-100 Innovia System Data Sheets.pdf Image 2 (lower right): Houston Airport System 14. Houston Landside Image 1 (lower left): Wedway brochures—IAH Houston Senate Subway Disney.pdf Image 2 (lower right): Houston Airport System 15. Kuala Lumpur Image 1 (lower left): www.bombardier.com Image 2 (lower right): Malaysia Airports (Sepang) Sdn Bhd 16. Las Vegas Image 1 (lower left): Bombardier C-100 CX-100 Innovia System Data Sheets.pdf Image 2 (lower right): Bombardier C-100 CX-100 Innovia System Data Sheets.pdf 17. London Gatwick Image 1 (lower left): www.bombardier.com Image 2 (lower right): Gatwick Airport Ltd. 18. London Heathrow Image 1 (lower left): Bombardier Innovia LHR London Heathrow brochure.pdf Image 2 (lower right): Bombardier Innovia LHR London Heathrow brochure.pdf 19. London Stansted Image 1 (lower left): www.bombardier.com Image 2 (lower right): Bombardier brochure 20. Madrid Image 1 (lower left): www.bombardier.com Image 2 (lower right): Aena (Airport Operator) 21. Mexico City Image 1 (lower left): www.dcc.at/ Image 2 (lower right): Grupo Aeroportuario de la Ciudad de México (Airport Group of Mexico City) 22. Miami Image 1 (lower left): www.bombardier.com Image 2 (lower right): Miami-Dade Aviation Department (MDAD) 23. Minneapolis/St. Paul Airside Image 1 (lower right): Otis Elevator Company Inc. Image 2 (lower right): Minneapolis/Saint Paul Metropolitan Airports Commission 24. Minneapolis/St. Paul Landside Image 1 (lower left): Otis Elevator Company Inc. Image 2 (lower right): Minneapolis/Saint Paul Metropolitan Airports Commission 25. New York–JFK Image 1 (lower left): www.bombardier.com Image 2 (lower right): Port Authority of New York and New Jersey 26. Newark Image 1 (lower left): www.bombardier.com Image 2 (lower right): Port Authority of New York and New Jersey 27. Orlando Image 1 (lower left): Bombardier C-100 CX-100 Innovia System Data Sheets.pdf Image 2 (lower right): Greater Orlando Aviation Authority (GOAA) 28. Osaka Kansai Image 1 (lower left): Kansai International Airport Co., Ltd. Image 2 (lower right): Kansai International Airport Co., Ltd. 29. Paris Charles de Gaulle Airside Image 1 (lower left): w1.siemens.com Image 2 (lower right): Aéroports de Paris 30. Paris Charles de Gaulle Landside Image 1 (lower left): w1.siemens.com Image 2 (lower right): Aéroports de Paris 31. Paris–Orly Image 1 (lower left): w1.siemens.com Image 2 (lower right): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orlyval 32. Pittsburgh Image 1 (lower left): Bombardier brochure on PIT system Image 2 (lower right): Allegheny County Airport Authority 33. Rome Leonardo da Vinci Image 1 (lower left): www.bombardier.com Image 2 (lower right): Aeroporti di Roma SpA 34. San Francisco Image 1 (lower left): www.bombardier.com Image 2 (lower right): San Francisco Airport Commission 35. Seattle Image 1 (lower left): www.bombardier.com Image 2 (lower right): Bombardier brochure on SEA 36. Seoul Image 1 (lower left): www.mhi.co.jp Image 2 (lower right): incheon_leaflet.pdf

202 37. Singapore Changi Image 1 (lower left): www.mhi.co.jp Image 2 (lower right): Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore/ Republic of Singapore Air Force 38. Taipei Image 1 (lower left): IHI Corporation Image 2 (lower right): Civil Aeronautics Administration 39. Tampa Airside Image 1 (lower left): www.bombardier.com Image 2 (lower right): Hillsborough County Aviation Authority 40. Tampa Landside Image 1 (lower left): www.bombardier.com Image 2 (lower right): Hillsborough County Aviation Authority 41. Tokyo Narita Image 1 (lower right): Otis Elevator Company Inc. Image 2 (lower left): Narita International Airport Corporation 42. Toronto Image 1 (lower left): www.dcc.at Image 2 (lower right): Greater Toronto Airports Authority (GTAA) 43. Washington Dulles Image 1: www.mhi.co.jp Image 2: Metropolitan Washington Airport Authority (MWAA) 44. Zurich Image 1 (lower left): Otis Elevator Company Inc. Image 2 (lower right): Flughafen Zürich

Next: Appendix C - Glossary »
Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports Get This Book
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TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Report 37: Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports includes guidance for planning and developing automated people mover (APM) systems at airports. The guidance in the report encompasses the planning and decision-making process, alternative system infrastructure and technologies, evaluation techniques and strategies, operation and maintenance requirements, coordination and procurement requirements, and other planning and development issues.

The guidebook includes an interactive CD that contains a database of detailed characteristics of the 44 existing APM systems. The CD is also available for download from TRB’s website as an ISO image. Links to the ISO image and instructions for burning a CD-ROM from an ISO image are provided below.

Help on Burning an .ISO CD-ROM Image

Download the .ISO CD-ROM Image

In March 2012, TRB released ACRP Report 37A: Guidebook for Measuring Performance of Automated People Mover Systems at Airports as a companion to ACRP Report 37. ACRP Report 37A is designed to help measure the performance of automated people mover (APM) systems at airports.

In June 2012, TRB released ACRP Report 67: Airport Passenger Conveyance Systems Planning Guidebook that offers guidance on the planning and implementation of passenger conveyance systems at airports.

(Warning: This is a large file that may take some time to download using a high-speed connection.)

Disclaimer: The CD-ROM is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences or the Transportation Research Board (collectively “TRB’) be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

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