National Academies Press: OpenBook

Learning, Remembering, Believing: Enhancing Human Performance (1994)

Chapter: B Biographical Sketches

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Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches." National Research Council. 1994. Learning, Remembering, Believing: Enhancing Human Performance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2303.
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Page 383

B
Biographical Sketches

In the interest of brevity, publications are not included in these sketches.

ROBERT A. BJORK is professor of psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). He earlier served as professor at the University of Michigan and has held visiting appointments at The Rockefeller University; the University of California, San Diego; Bell Laboratories; and Dartmouth College. His research interests focus on how information is encoded and accessed in human memory and on the implications of that research for training and instruction. He was awarded UCLA's Distinguished Teaching Award and has chaired the Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics at UCLA. He is a fellow of the Society of Experimental Psychological Association and the American Psychological Society. He is the appointed editor of Psychological Review (1995-2000) and served earlier as editor of Memory and Cognition (1981-1985). He holds a Ph.D. degree in mathematical psychology from Stanford University.

DONALD F. DANSEREAU is professor of psychology and research scientist at the Institute of Behavioral Research at Texas Christian University. His research interests in the area of applied cognition focus on techniques for improving communication, learning, and performance. His specific research topics include cooperative learning among peers and node-link maps as alternatives to standard texts, and he has served as principal investigator in 13 federally funded research projects. He is a recipient of the chancellor's Award for Research and Creativity at Texas Christian University. He holds a Ph.D. degree in psychology from Carnegie-Mellon University.

Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches." National Research Council. 1994. Learning, Remembering, Believing: Enhancing Human Performance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2303.
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Page 384

DANIEL DRUCKMAN is study director at the National Research Council and adjunct professor of conflict management at George Mason University. Previously, he held senior positions at Mathematica, Inc., and Booz, Allen, and Hamilton and was a research scholar at the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis in Laxenburg, Austria. He has also been a consultant to the U.S. Foreign Service Institute, the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, and the U.S. Institute of Peace. His research interests focus on factors that influence negotiating behavior, and on ways to improve the negotiation process through situation design and training. He currently serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Conflict Resolution, the Negotiation Journal, and the Journal of Applied Social Psychology and is an associate editor of Simulation & Gaming.   He holds a Ph.D. degree in social psychology from Northwestern University.

ERIC EICH is associate professor of psychology at the University of British Columbia. He previously served as director of the Behavioral Sciences Laboratory at the University of California, Irvine, and held a visiting appointment in the departments of psychology and anesthesiology at University of California, Los Angeles. His research centers on the state-dependent effects of drugs, emotions, and environments on learning and remembering and is supported by grants from the (U.S.) National Institute of Mental Health and the (Canadian) Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC). He is the recipient of an NSERC University Research Fellowship, a Killam Memorial Fellowship, and the Knox Master Teacher Award. He is a member of the American Psychological Society and currently serves on the editorial board of Memory and Cognition. He holds a Ph.D. degree in cognitive psychology from the University of Toronto.

DEBORAH L. FELTZ is professor and chair of physical education and exercise science at Michigan State University (MSU). Her research interests have centered on the interrelationships among self-confidence, anxiety, and sport performance. She has earned early career distinguished scholar awards from the American Alliance of Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance and the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity, and she has received a distinguished faculty award from MSU. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education and the American Psychological Association. She served on the sport psychology advisory committee to the U.S. Olympic Committee (1989-1992) and currently serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology. She holds a Ph.D. degree in sport psychology from Pennsylvania State University.

Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches." National Research Council. 1994. Learning, Remembering, Believing: Enhancing Human Performance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2303.
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Page 385

LARRY L. JACOBY is a professor of psychology at McMaster University. He earlier served as a professor at the University of Utah. His research interests focus on how information is stored and retrieved from human memory and on the distinction between automatic and consciously controlled processes. He currently serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Memory and Language and the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition. He holds a Ph.D. degree in memory from Southern Illinois University.

DAVID W. JOHNSON is professor of educational psychology at the University of Minnesota. His research interests focus on cooperation and competition, conflict resolution, team effectiveness, organizational change, experiential learning, relationships among diverse team members, and the implications of that research for training and instruction. He has received awards for outstanding research from the American Personnel and Guidance Association, the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (Gordon Allport Award), the Association for Specialists in Group Work (Division of American Association for Counseling and Development), the American Society for Engineering Education, and the National Council for Social Studies. He has received the Award for Outstanding Contribution to American Education from the Minnesota Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association. He holds an Ed.D. degree in psychology from Columbia University.

JOHN F. KIHLSTROM is professor of psychology at the University of Arizona. He previously held positions at Harvard University and the University of Wisconsin and has held visiting appointments at Stanford University, the University of Michigan, and Macquarie University in Australia. His research interests focus on cognition in a personal and social context with a special emphasis on the relations between conscious and nonconscious mental life. In 1979, he received the American Psychological Association's Distinguished Scientific Award for an Early Career Contribution to Psychology; he has also received numerous awards for his contributions to hypnosis research. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the American Psychological Society. He has chaired grant review panels at the National Institute of Mental Health and is editor-elect of Psychological Science (1994-1999). He holds a Ph.D. degree in personality and experimental psychopathology from the University of Pennsylvania.

ROBERTA L. KLATSKY is professor and head of the Department of Psychology at Carnegie-Mellon University. She was previously a professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and she has held visiting appointments at Stanford University and the Instituto Tecnologico y de

Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches." National Research Council. 1994. Learning, Remembering, Believing: Enhancing Human Performance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2303.
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Page 386

Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Mexico. Her research is concerned with perception through touch and locomotion and with motor planning and performance. She has studied how people's abilities to perceive through nonvisual modalities and plan action change with training. She has served as chair of the American Psychological Association's Committee on Scientific Awards, and she currently serves on the National Research Council's Committee on Human Factors and the governing board of the Psychonomic Society. She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the American Psychological Society. She holds a Ph.D. degree in cognitive psychology from Stanford University.

LYNNE M. REDER is a professor of psychology at Carnegie-Mellon University. Her research interests include developing a unified model of memory and understanding the use of strategies and metacognitive judgments for information retrieval, and she has also been concerned with developing instructional materials to maximize retention and retrieval. Reder has served on the editorial boards of Memory and Cognition, and Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human, Learning and Memory. She holds a Ph.D. degree in experimental psychology from the University of Michigan.

DANIEL M. WEGNER is professor of psychology at the University of Virginia. He earlier served as a professor at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas, and has held a visiting appointment at the University of Texas at Austin. His research interests focus on the role of thought in the self-control of thought, emotion, and action. He currently serves on editorial boards for the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Social Cognition, and Basic and Applied Social Psychology. He holds a Ph.D. degree in social psychology from Michigan State University.

ROBERT B. ZAJONC is Charles Horton Cooley professor of psychology and director of the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He has held visiting professorships at the University of Amsterdam, Oxford University, Stanford University, and the Maison des Sciences de l'Homme in Paris. His research interests focus on the basic processes involved in social behavior and most recently with the interface between cognition and emotion. He is a recipient of the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award of the American Psychological Association, and he is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He currently serves as chair of the Executive Board of the Social Science Research Council. He holds a Ph.D. degree in social psychology from the University of Michigan and honorary degrees from the University of Louvain and the University of Warsaw.

Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches." National Research Council. 1994. Learning, Remembering, Believing: Enhancing Human Performance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2303.
×
Page 383
Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches." National Research Council. 1994. Learning, Remembering, Believing: Enhancing Human Performance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2303.
×
Page 384
Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches." National Research Council. 1994. Learning, Remembering, Believing: Enhancing Human Performance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2303.
×
Page 385
Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches." National Research Council. 1994. Learning, Remembering, Believing: Enhancing Human Performance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2303.
×
Page 386
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Learning, Remembering, Believing: Enhancing Human Performance Get This Book
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Can such techniques as sleep learning and hypnosis improve performance? Do we sometimes confuse familiarity with mastery? Can we learn without making mistakes? These questions apply in the classroom, in the military, and on the assembly line.

Learning, Remembering, Believing addresses these and other key issues in learning and performance. The volume presents leading-edge theories and findings from a wide range of research settings: from pilots learning to fly to children learning about physics by throwing beanbags. Common folklore is explored, and promising research directions are identified. The authors also continue themes from their first two volumes: Enhancing Human Performance (1988) and In the Mind's Eye (1991).

The result is a thorough and readable review of

  • Learning and remembering. The volume evaluates the effects of subjective experience on learning--why we often overestimate what we know, why we may not need a close match between training settings and real-world tasks, and why we experience such phenomena as illusory remembering and unconscious plagiarism.
  • Learning and performing in teams. The authors discuss cooperative learning in different age groups and contexts. Current views on team performance are presented, including how team-learning processes can be improved and whether team-building interventions are effective.
  • Mental and emotional states. This is a critical review of the evidence that learning is affected by state of mind. Topics include hypnosis, meditation, sleep learning, restricted environmental stimulation, and self-confidence and the self-efficacy theory of learning.
  • New directions. The volume looks at two new ideas for improving performance: emotions induced by another person--socially induced affect--and strategies for controlling one's thoughts. The committee also considers factors inherent in organizations--workplaces, educational facilities, and the military--that affect whether and how they implement training programs.

Learning, Remembering, Believing offers an understanding of human learning that will be useful to training specialists, psychologists, educators, managers, and individuals interested in all dimensions of human performance.

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