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Page 38
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX A." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2009. First Amendment Implications for Transit Facilities: Speech, Advertising, and Loitering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23031.
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Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX A." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2009. First Amendment Implications for Transit Facilities: Speech, Advertising, and Loitering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23031.
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Page 39
Page 40
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX A." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2009. First Amendment Implications for Transit Facilities: Speech, Advertising, and Loitering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23031.
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38 APPENDIX A ORDINANCES AND REGULATIONS The following are examples of ordinances and regulations governing expressive activities in and around transit facili- ties, or on other City or State property. While transit officials may find it useful to consult these documents, the citation of the ordinances and regulations herein is not intended to serve as an endorsement of their legality or constitutionality. Transit officials should always consult an attorney and carefully review the law before adopting any similar ordinances or regulations. Advertising • New York, N.Y., R.C.N.Y. tit. 34, § 4-12(j) (“Commercial advertising vehicles”). • New York, N.Y., Administrative Code § 16-132 (“Lease of advertising space on litter baskets”). • Boston, Mass., Municipal Code, § 16-12.3 (“Advertising”). • Boston, Mass., Municipal Code, § 22-64 (“Commercial advertising and display”). • Atlanta, Ga., Code of Ordinances, § 138-43(i) (“Bus shelters – commercial advertisements”). • Kansas City, Mo., Code of Ordinances, § 4-1 (“Placing signs or advertising material on public property”). • Phoenix, Az., City Code, §§ 3-1 et seq. (“Advertising”). • Tex. Transp. Code § 391.031 (“Unlawful Outdoor Advertising; Offense”). • Wisconsin Highways Code, § 84.30 (“Regulation of outdoor advertising”). • Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA), Guidelines Governing Commercial Advertising (adopted Aug. 3, 1972) (amended Nov. 20, 2003) (available from WMATA upon request). http://www.wmata.com/about_metro/docs/Advertising_Guidelines.pdf • WMATA, Guidelines for Public Service Advertising (adopted Dec. 12, 1996) (amended Nov. 20, 2003) (available from WMATA upon request). http://www.wmata.com/about_metro/docs/PSA_Guidelines_Nov_20_2003.pdf • WMATA Use Regulations, § 100.9 (“Advertising on Metrobus and Metrorail Systems”). Placement of Newsracks • Seattle, Wash., Municipal Code, ch. 15.14 (“Newstands”). • Portland, Or., Municipal Code, ch. 17.46 (“Newsracks”). Charitable Solicitation • New York, N.Y., R.C.N.Y. tit. 56, ch.1, § 1-04(s) (“Unlawful solicitation”). • New York, N.Y., R.C.N.Y. tit. 68, ch.1, § 1-01–1-04 (“Granting of Licenses for Public Solicitation”). • New York, N.Y., Administrative Code § 21-111 (“Soliciting of contributions in public”). • Indianapolis, Ind., Revised Code, § 431-701 et seq. (“Solicitation in Roadways”). • Charlotte, N.C., Code of Ordinances, § 4-66 et seq. (“Airport Charitable Solicitation and Demonstration Control”). • N.Y. Executive Law, ch. 18, art. 7-A (“Solicitation and Collection of Funds for Charitable Purposes”). • Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 4511.51 (“Hitchhiking—soliciting employment, business, or contributions from occupant of ve- hicle”). • Tex. Transp. Code § 552.007 et seq. (“Solicitation by Pedestrians”). • Wis. Stat. Ann. § 440.41 et seq. (“Solicitation of Funds for Charitable Purposes”). Leafleting • Atlanta, Ga., Code of Ordinances, §§ 22-146 et seq. (“Distribution of literature and solicitation of funds”). • San Diego, Cal., Municipal Code, art. VII, div. 00 § 57.16 (“Handbills-Defined-Distribution Regulated”). http://docs.sandiego.gov/municode/MuniCodeChapter05/Ch05Art07Division00.pdf • Phoenix, Az., City Code, §§ 4-127 et seq. (“Conduct at City Airports Requiring a Permit”). • Kansas City, Mo., Code of Ordinances, §§ 4-31 et seq. (“Handbills”). • Hillsborough County Aviation Authority, Rules & Regulations No. R340, Tampa International Airport, § 4 (“First Amendment Activities”). http://www.tampaairport.com/airport_business/operations/rules_regulations/r340_rules_and_regulations.pdf • Amtrak, Regulations Governing Exercise of First Amendment Activities on Amtrak Property, http://www.amtrak.com/pdf/First_Amendment012406.pdf. • Clark County Department of Aviation, Rules and Regulations, § V,

39 http://www.hnd.aero/downloads/RR%2010_30_06_FINAL.pdf. • WMATA Use Regulations, § 100.10 (“Free Speech Activities”). Panhandling • Cleveland, Ohio, City Code § 605.031 (“Aggressive Solicitation”). • Boston, Mass., Municipal Code § 16-41 (“Prohibiting Aggressive Solicitation”). • Atlanta, Ga., Code of Ordinances, § 43-1(d) (“aggressive solicitation”). • Minneapolis, Minn., Ord. No. 2007-Or-042 (enacted June 15, 2007); Minneapolis, Minn., City Code, § 385-60 (“Aggres- sive solicitation”). • San Diego, Cal., Municipal Code, art. II, div. 40 §§ 52.4001 et seq. (“Aggressive Solicita- tion”). http://docs.sandiego.gov/municode/MuniCodeChapter05/Ch05Art02Division40.pdf • Kansas City, Mo., Code of Ordinances, § 50-8.5 (“Prohibitions in certain areas”). • Indianapolis, Ind., Revised Code, § 407-102 (“Panhandling”). • Phoenix, Az., City Code, § 23-7 (“Sec. 23-7. (“Aggressive solicitation in public areas; soliciting near banks, automated teller machines, on public transportation vehicles, at bus stops, or between sunset and sunrise.”). • Charlotte, N.C., Code of Ordinances, § 15-15 (“Public solicitation and begging regulated”). San Francisco, Cal., Police Code, art. II, § 120-2 (“Aggressive Solicitation Ban/Substance Abuse and Mental Health Diversion Program”). Loitering • New York, N.Y., R.C.N.Y. tit. 56, ch.1, § 1-04(m) (“Loitering for illegal purposes”). • Atlanta, Ga., Code of Ordinances, § 22-115 (“Loitering prohibited”). • Minneapolis, Minn., City Code, § 385-50 (“Loitering”). • Indianapolis, Ind., Revised Code, § 407-103 (“Loitering, unlawful assemblies”). • Phoenix, Az., City Code, § 23-8 (“Loitering”). • Philadelphia, Penn., City Code, § 10-603 (“Loitering”). • Boston, Mass., Municipal Code § 16-12.2 (“Loitering”). • Kansas City, Mo., Code of Ordinances, § 50-161 (“Loitering”). • N.Y. Penal Law, ch. 40, § 240.35 (“Loitering”). Street Performance • Seattle, Wash., Seattle Center Rules, available at: http://www.seattlecenter.com/information/CampusRulesFinal_2007.pdf.

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TRB’s Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Legal Research Digest 29: First Amendment Implications for Transit Facilities: Speech, Advertising, and Loitering provides an analytical legal synthesis of available regulations, statutes, policies, and case decisions pertaining to permissible and impermissible restrictions on speech and expressive behavior at transit facilities and aboard transit vehicles; a clear discussion pertaining to sidewalks and transit facilities as public fora; attempts to regulate advertising on public property; and a discussion of the enforcement of anti-loitering and anti-panhandling regulations on or near transit facilities.

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