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Suggested Citation:"REFERENCES." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2004. Operational Experiences with Flexible Transit Services. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23364.
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43 REFERENCES Arrillaga, B. and G.E. Mouchahoir, Demand-Responsive Transportation System Planning Guidelines, UMTA- VA-06-0012-74-6, Urban Mass Transportation Admini- stration, Washington, D.C., Apr. 1974, 41 pp. Cervero, R. and C. Beutler, Adaptive Transit: Enhancing Suburban Transit Services, Report 424, University of California Transportation Center, Berkeley, Calif., 1999, 170 pp. City of Winnipeg Transit Department, “Evaluation of DART (Dial-a-Ride Transit),” Memorandum for sub- mission to the Committee on Works and Operations, Jan. 30, 1997. Cole, L.M., Tomorrow’s Transportation: New Systems for the Urban Future, U.S. Department of Housing and Ur- ban Development, Washington, D.C., 1968, 100 pp. Conklin, J., C. Schweiger, and B. Marks, Rural Transit ITS Best Practices, Report FHWA-OP-03-77, Intelligent Transportation Systems Joint Program Office, U.S. De- partment of Transportation, Mar. 2003 [Online]. Available: http://www.itsdocs.fhwa.dot.gov/JPODOCS/REPTS_TE/ 13784.html. Crain & Associates, Inc., Paratransit Technical Assistance Program: Five Year Implementation Plan, Metropolitan Transportation Commission, Oakland, Calif., 1999. Durvasula, M. and K. Priya, A GIS-Based Decision Sup- port Tool for Route Deviation Transit Scheduling and Service Design, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1999, 218 pp. Durvasula, P.K., B.L. Smith, R.E. Turochy, S.C. Brich, and M.J. Demetsky, Peninsula Transportation District Com- mission Route Deviation Feasibility Study, FHWA/VTRC 99-R11, Final Report, Virginia Transpor- tation Research Council, Charlottesville, Nov. 1998, 73 pp. Farwell, R.G., “Demand-Driven Transit Operations: Flex- Route Services,” Transportation Quarterly, Vol. 52, No. 1, Jan. 1998, pp. 31–43. Flusberg, M., “An Innovative Public Transportation Sys- tem for a Small City: The Merrill, Wisconsin, Case Study,” Transportation Research Record 606, Transpor- tation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 1976, pp. 54–59. Fu, L., “Planning and Design of Flex-Route Transit Ser- vices,” Transportation Research Record 1791, Trans- portation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 2002, pp. 59–66. Hemily, B. and R. King, TCRP Synthesis of Transit Prac- tice 41: The Use of Small Buses in Transit Service, Transportation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 2002, 71 pp. Loukakos, D. and G. Blackwelder, Personalized Public Transit—ITS Decision Report, Partners for Advanced Transit and Highways, Institute of Transportation Stud- ies, University of California, Berkeley, 2000. Mergel, J., Small City Transit: Merrill, Wisconsin, Point Deviation Service in a Rural Community, Transporta- tion Systems Center, Cambridge, Mass., 1976, 18 pp. Multisystems, Inc., and Crain & Associates, Inc., Evaluat- ing Transit Operations for Individuals with Disabilities, TCRP Web Document 2, Transit Cooperative Research Program, Transportation Research Board, National Re- search Council, Washington, D.C., 1997, 366 pp. Nelson/Nygaard Consulting Associates, Flexible Commu- nity Transit Services: Planning, Operations, and Tech- nology, Instructor Notebook, National Transit Institute, New Brunswick, N.J., May 2003. Pratelli, A., “Some Approaches on Checkpoint Dial-a-Ride Problems,” Eighth International Conference on Urban Transport and the Environment in the 21st Century, sponsored by the Wessex Institute of Technology, Seville, Spain, Mar. 2002, WIT Press, Southampton, United Kingdom. “PRTC’s Innovative Local Transit Services and ITS Pro- ject,” Potomac and Rappahannock Transportation Com- mission, Woodbridge, Va., updated Feb. 2003. Rosenbloom, S., Service Routes, Route Deviation, and General Public Paratransit in Urban, Suburban, and Rural Transit Systems, FTA-AZ-26-7000-96-1, Federal Transit Administration, Washington, D.C., 1996, 90 pp. Smith, B.L., “Supporting Demand-Responsive Transit Op- erations: A Prototype System Designed Using the Na- tional ITS Architecture,” Transportation Technology for Tomorrow: Proceedings of the Eighth ITS America, De- troit, Mich., 1998, 19 pp. Urbitran Associates, Inc., TCRP Report 55: Guidelines for Enhancing Suburban Mobility Using Public Transpor- tation, Transportation Research Board, National Re- search Council, Washington, D.C., 1999, 87 pp.

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TRB’s Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Synthesis 53: Operational Experiences with Flexible Transit Services examines transit agency experiences with “flexible transit services,” including all types of hybrid services that are not pure demand-responsive (including dial-a-ride and Americans with Disabilities Act paratransit) or fixed-route services, but that fall somewhere in between those traditional service models.

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