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Continuing Innovation in Information Technology: Workshop Report (2016)

Chapter: Appendix A: Committee Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Continuing Innovation in Information Technology: Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23393.
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A
Committee Biographies

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PETER LEE, Chair, is a computer scientist and technology innovator at Microsoft Corporation. As corporate vice president, Dr. Lee’s mission is to create research-powered technologies and products for Microsoft, while at the same time advancing human knowledge through the open dissemination of fundamental research. He leads the company’s New Experiences and Technologies group (MSR NExT), a global organization that conducts R&D in a wide range of technology areas. Recent scientific contributions and technology innovations from NExT include advances in deep neural networks for computer vision, as well as the simultaneous language translation feature in Skype; new silicon and postsilicon computing technologies; experimental undersea data centers; next-generation augmented-reality experiences for HoloLens and virtual reality devices; and large-scale sociotechnological experiments such as XiaoIce and Tay.

Dr. Lee joined Microsoft in 2010 as distinguished scientist and managing director of the Microsoft Research Redmond laboratory and later took on leadership of Microsoft’s U.S.-based research operations, comprising seven laboratories and more than 500 researchers, engineers, and support personnel. Before joining Microsoft, he held key positions in government and in academia. His most recent position was at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), where he founded and directed a major technology office that supported research in computing and related areas in the social and physical sciences. One of the highlights of his work at DARPA was the DARPA Network Challenge, which mobilized millions of people worldwide in a hunt for red weather balloons—a unique experiment in social media and open innovation that fundamentally altered how the Department of Defense thought about social networks. Before DARPA, Dr. Lee served as head of Carnegie Mellon University’s (CMU’s) computer science department,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Continuing Innovation in Information Technology: Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23393.
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top-ranked in the nation. He also served as the university’s vice provost for research. At CMU, he carried out research in software reliability, program analysis, security, and language design. He is well-known for his codevelopment of proof-carrying code techniques for enhanced software security and has tackled problems as diverse as programming for large-scale modular robotics systems and shape analysis for C programs. Dr. Lee is a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and serves the research community at the national level, including policy contributions to the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology and membership of both the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Computer Science and Telecommunications Board and the Advisory Council of the Computer and Information Science and Engineering Directorate of the National Science Foundation (NSF). He was the former chair of the Computing Research Association and has testified before both the U.S. House Science and Technology Committee and the U.S. Senate Commerce Committee. Dr. Lee holds a Ph.D. in computer and communication sciences from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and bachelor’s degrees in mathematics and computer sciences, also from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

MARK DEAN is the John Fisher Distinguished Professor at the University of Tennessee (UT) College of Engineering. His research focus is advanced computer architecture (beyond Von Neumann systems), data-centric computing, and computational sciences. Before joining UT, Dr. Dean was chief technology officer, Middle East and Africa, for IBM and an IBM fellow. In this role he was responsible for technical strategy, technical skills development, and exploring new technology-based solutions for the region. These responsibilities include the development of solutions specific to the emerging needs of the businesses and cultures in industry segments such as mobile services (banking, health care, education, government), natural resource management (oil, gas, mining, forest, water), cloud-based business services, and security (fraud protection, risk management, privacy, cybersecurity). Dr. Dean was also vice president World Wide Strategy and Operations for IBM Research. In that role, he was responsible for setting the direction of IBM’s overall research strategy across eight worldwide labs and for leading the global operations and information systems teams. These responsibilities include management of the division’s business model, research strategy, hiring, university relations, internal/external recognition, personnel development, innovation initiatives and the division’s operations. During his career, Dr. Dean has developed all types of computer systems, from embedded systems to supercomputers, including testing of the first gigahertz CMOS microprocessor, and establishing the team that developed the Blue Gene supercomputer. He was also chief engineer for the development of the IBM PC/AT, ISA systems bus, PS/2 Model 70 & 80, the Color Graphics Adapter in the original IBM PC, and holds three of the nine

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Continuing Innovation in Information Technology: Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23393.
×

patents for the original IBM PC. One invention—the Industry Standard Architecture (ISA) “bus,” which permitted add-on devices like the keyboard, disk drives and printers to be connected to the motherboard—would earn election to the National Inventors Hall of Fame for Dr. Dean and his colleague Dennis Moeller. Dr. Dean’s most recent awards include National Institute of Science Outstanding Scientist Award, member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), IEEE fellow, Black Engineering of the Year, the University of Tennessee COE Dougherty Award, member of the National Inventor’s Hall of Fame, and recipient of the Ronald H. Brown American Innovators Award. Dr. Dean received a B.S.E.E. degree from the University of Tennessee in 1979, an M.S.E.E. degree from Florida Atlantic University in 1982, and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 1992.

EDWARD FRANK is cofounder and CEO of Brilliant Lime, Inc., and Cloud Parity, Inc., both social/mobile software firms. Previously, Dr. Frank was a vice president at Apple, Inc., and corporate vice president for research and development at Broadcom. Before becoming corporate vice president of R&D, he co-founded and led the engineering group for Broadcom’s Wireless LAN business, which is now one of Broadcom’s largest business units. Dr. Frank joined Broadcom in May 1999 following its acquisition of Epigram, Inc., where he was the founding CEO and executive vice president. From 1993 to 1996, he was a co-founder and vice president of engineering at NeTpower, Inc., a computer workstation manufacturer. From 1988 to 1993, Dr. Frank was a distinguished engineer at Sun Microsystems, Inc., where he co-architected several generations of Sun’s SPARCstations and was a principal member of Sun’s Green Project, which developed the precursor to the Java(tm) cross-platform web programming language. Dr. Frank holds more than 40 issued patents. He is a University Life Trustee of CMU and a member of its board’s executive committee. He received a B.S.E.E. and an M.S.E.E. from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in computer science from CMU.

YANN LeCUN is director of artificial intelligence research at Facebook and Silver Professor of Computer Science at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences. He is the founding director of the New York University (NYU) Center for Data Science and holds appointments as professor of neural science with the Center for Neural Science and professor of electrical and computer engineering with the ECE Department at NYU/Poly. In 1987, Dr. Lecun joined Geoff Hinton’s group at the University of Toronto as a research associate. He then joined the Adaptive Systems Research Department at AT&T Bell Laboratories in Holmdel, New Jersey, in 1988. In 1991, he spent 6 months with the Laboratoire Central de Recherche of Thomson-CSF in Orsay, France. Upon his return to the United States, he rejoined Bell Labs. Shortly after AT&T’s second breakup in 1996, he became head of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Continuing Innovation in Information Technology: Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23393.
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the Image Processing Research Department, part of Larry Rabiner’s Speech and Image Processing Research Lab at AT&T Labs-Research in Red Bank, New Jersey. In 2002, he became a fellow of the NEC Research Institute in Princeton. Dr. LeCun joined the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at NYU as a professor of computer science in 2003. He was named Silver Professor in 2008. In 2013, he became the founding director of the NYU Center for Data Science. Dr. LeCun has been associate editor of PLoS ONE, International Journal of Computer Vision, IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, Pattern Recognition and Applications, Machine Learning Journal, and IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks. Since 1997, he has served as general chair and organizer of the Learning Workshop, held every year since 1986 in Snowbird, Utah. He is also a member of the Science Advisory Board of the Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics, University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. LeCun has given numerous invited talks at various international conferences and workshops. He has published more than 180 technical papers and book chapters on machine learning, computer vision, robotics, pattern recognition, neural networks, handwriting recognition, image compression, document understanding, image processing, VLSI design, and information theory. His handwriting-recognition technology is used by several banks around the world, and his image compression technology, called DjVu, is used by hundreds of websites and publishers and millions of users to access scanned documents on the web. An image recognition model he devised, convolutional network, is used by such companies as Facebook, Google, Microsoft, NEC, Baidu, and AT&T/NCR for products and services such as image recognition and tagging, document recognition, intelligent kiosk, and other applications. Dr. LeCun is the recipient of the 2014 IEEE Neural Network Pioneer Award, awarded by the Computational Intelligence Society. He received a diplôme d’ingénieur from the Ecole Superieure d’Ingénieur en Electrotechnique et Electronique (ESIEE), Paris, in 1983, a diplôme d’etudes approfondies (DEA) from Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, in 1984, and a Ph.D. in computer science from the same university in 1987.

BARBARA LISKOV is an institute professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dr. Liskov’s research interests include distributed systems, replication algorithms to provide fault-tolerance, programming methodology, and programming languages. Her current research projects include Byzantine-fault-tolerant storage systems and online storage systems that provide confidentiality and integrity for the stored information. Dr. Liskov is a member of the NAE, the National Academy of Sciences, and the National Inventors Hall of Fame (inducted in 2012). She is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the ACM and a charter fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. She received the ACM Turing Award in 2009, the ACM SIGPLAN Programming Language Achievement Award in 2008, the IEEE Von Neumann medal in 2004, and a

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Continuing Innovation in Information Technology: Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23393.
×

lifetime achievement award from the Society of Women Engineers in 1996. In 2003, Dr. Liskov was named one of the 50 most important women in science by Discover Magazine. Dr. Liskov received a B.A. in mathematics from University of California, Berkeley, and M.S. and Ph.D., both in computer science, from Stanford University.

ELIZABETH MYNATT is the executive director of the Institute for People and Technology (IPaT), a College of Computing professor, and director of the Everyday Computing Lab. Themes in her research include supporting informal collaboration and awareness in office environments, enabling creative work and visual communication, and augmenting social processes for managing personal information. She is also one of the principal researchers in the Aware Home Research Initiative; investigating the design of future home technologies, especially those that enable older adults to continue living independently as opposed to moving to an institutional care setting. Dr. Mynatt is an internationally recognized expert in the areas of ubiquitous computing and assistive technologies. Her research contributes to ongoing work in personal health informatics, computer-supported collaborative work and human-computer interface design. She is a member of the SIGCHI Academy, a Sloan and Kavli research fellow, and serves on Microsoft Research’s Technical Advisory Board. Dr. Mynatt is also a member of the Computing Community Consortium, an NSF-sponsored effort to engage the computing research community in envisioning more audacious research challenges. She has published more than 100 scientific papers and chaired the CHI 2010 conference, the premier international conference in human–computer interaction. Before joining the Georgia Institute of Technology faculty in 1998, she was a member of the research staff at Xerox PARC, working with the founder of ubiquitous computing, Mark Weiser. Her research is supported by multiple grants from NSF, including a 5-year NSF CAREER award. Other honorary awards include being named the Top Woman Innovator in Technology by Atlanta Woman magazine in 2005 and the 2003 College of Computing’s Dean’s Award. Dr. Mynatt earned her B.S. (summa cum laude) in computer science from North Carolina State University and her M.S. and Ph.D. in computer science from Georgia Tech.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Continuing Innovation in Information Technology: Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23393.
×
Page 73
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Continuing Innovation in Information Technology: Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23393.
×
Page 74
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Continuing Innovation in Information Technology: Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23393.
×
Page 75
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Continuing Innovation in Information Technology: Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23393.
×
Page 76
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Continuing Innovation in Information Technology: Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23393.
×
Page 77
Next: Appendix B: Presentations »
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The 2012 National Research Council report Continuing Innovation in Information Technology illustrates how fundamental research in information technology (IT), conducted at industry and universities, has led to the introduction of entirely new product categories that ultimately became billion-dollar industries. The central graphic from that report portrays and connects areas of major investment in basic research, university-based research, and industry research and development; the introduction of important commercial products resulting from this research; billion-dollar-plus industries stemming from it; and present-day IT market segments and representative U.S. firms whose creation was stimulated by the decades-long research.

At a workshop hosted by the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board on March 5, 2015, leading academic and industry researchers and industrial technologists described key research and development results and their contributions and connections to new IT products and industries, and illustrated these developments as overlays to the 2012 "tire tracks" graphic. The principal goal of the workshop was to collect and make available to policy makers and members of the IT community first-person narratives that illustrate the link between government investments in academic and industry research to the ultimate creation of new IT industries. This report provides summaries of the workshop presentations organized into five broad themes - (1) fueling the innovation pipeline, (2) building a connected world, (3) advancing the hardware foundation, (4) developing smart machines, and (5) people and computers - and ends with a summary of remarks from the concluding panel discussion.

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