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Memorial Tributes: Volume 20 (2016)

Chapter: MAX L. WILLIAMS JR.

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Suggested Citation:"MAX L. WILLIAMS JR.." National Academy of Engineering. 2016. Memorial Tributes: Volume 20. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23394.
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Suggested Citation:"MAX L. WILLIAMS JR.." National Academy of Engineering. 2016. Memorial Tributes: Volume 20. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23394.
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MAX L. WILLIAMS JR.

1922–2013

Elected in 2003

“For fundamental developments in fracture mechanics and for providing guidance to industry and government that has facilitated technology transfer.”

BY K.L. (LARRY) DEVRIES
SUBMITTED BY THE NAE HOME SECRETARY

MAX L. WILLIAMS JR., a pioneer and leader in fracture mechanics, passed away on September 18, 2013. He was 91.

Williams was born in the Aspinall neighborhood of Pittsburgh on February 22, 1922. Twenty years later, he would obtain his bachelor’s degree at the Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh. He entered the US Air Force as a captain and an aircraft maintenance engineer in 1943 before earning his MS (1947), engineer’s degree (AE; 1948), and PhD (1950), all in aeronautics, from the California Institute of Technology. He then went from lecturer to tenure-track professor of aeronautics.

Early in his academic career, Williams was internationally renowned as a pioneer in fracture mechanics. His identification of the universal nature of the stress field at the tip of a crack became the cornerstone for the field of fracture mechanics through the development of the single most important parameter controlling fracture. He was a prime contributor to introducing the solid rocket motor industry—then dominated by chemical engineers—to viscoelastic, structural failure analysis. Even today you can open any number of fracture mechanics books to find M.L. Williams referenced. In addition, he was the founding and long-time editor in chief of the premiere journal on fracture mechanics, the International Journal of Fracture.

Suggested Citation:"MAX L. WILLIAMS JR.." National Academy of Engineering. 2016. Memorial Tributes: Volume 20. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23394.
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Fracture mechanics is in part a mature field thanks to his pioneering work. No structural fracture/failure analysis could be conceived without his contribution; he even pioneered the extension of these concepts to the mechanics of earthquake generation in the 1950s and to adhesive joints in the 1960s. During the height of the Cold War, Williams was instrumental in developing the tools for the failsafe operation of solid propellant rocket motors (e.g., Polaris, SRAM, and Minuteman), which made the national defense and space efforts viable.

For example, the influence of those developments concerning the mechanical behavior of polymeric materials was felt through the Richard Feynman analysis of the O-ring seals in the Challenger disaster. Williams’ influence is also felt throughout the engineering field where mechanical applications of polymers in today’s engineering environments are involved.

Williams left the research culture of Caltech to become dean at the University of Utah College of Engineering in 1965. He was an effective but demanding dean, making a number of improvements and important faculty hires as well as focusing on research and graduate studies. Under his administration, the Departments of Computer Science, Bioengineering, and Materials Science and Engineering were added to the college. He also created a need-based scholarship program for underrepresented students.

In 1973 Williams resigned from the University of Utah as well as from much of his personal research to accept the position of dean of the School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh, where he was also a professor until 1985. Later, he became more involved as an advisor for government agencies.

Throughout his career, he demonstrated a firm belief in practical, hands-on engineering. He was a registered engineer and had a major influence in guiding national programs of defense research, saving millions of dollars by judiciously supporting, criticizing, or phasing studies and programs. His practical insights transitioned into engineering management through guidance of over 20 engineering startups, which depended critically on mature engineering judgment.

Suggested Citation:"MAX L. WILLIAMS JR.." National Academy of Engineering. 2016. Memorial Tributes: Volume 20. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23394.
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Elected to the NAE in 2003, Williams was a consummate lecturer and held many appointments nationally and internationally. His national impact is memorialized through his involvement in numerous government committees ranging from the US Department of State to NASA and the Office of Science and Technology Policy.

Dr. Williams is survived by his loving wife of 46 years, Mel; children Gregory and Richard Williams and Christine Mann; and stepchildren Pamela Allande, Marilyn Shupe, and Walter McKinney.

Suggested Citation:"MAX L. WILLIAMS JR.." National Academy of Engineering. 2016. Memorial Tributes: Volume 20. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23394.
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Suggested Citation:"MAX L. WILLIAMS JR.." National Academy of Engineering. 2016. Memorial Tributes: Volume 20. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23394.
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Page 373
Suggested Citation:"MAX L. WILLIAMS JR.." National Academy of Engineering. 2016. Memorial Tributes: Volume 20. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23394.
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Page 374
Suggested Citation:"MAX L. WILLIAMS JR.." National Academy of Engineering. 2016. Memorial Tributes: Volume 20. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23394.
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This is the 20th Volume in the series Memorial Tributes compiled by the National Academy of Engineering as a personal remembrance of the lives and outstanding achievements of its members and foreign associates. These volumes are intended to stand as an enduring record of the many contributions of engineers and engineering to the benefit of humankind. In most cases, the authors of the tributes are contemporaries or colleagues who had personal knowledge of the interests and the engineering accomplishments of the deceased. Through its members and foreign associates, the Academy carries out the responsibilities for which it was established in 1964.

Under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering was formed as a parallel organization of outstanding engineers. Members are elected on the basis of significant contributions to engineering theory and practice and to the literature of engineering or on the basis of demonstrated unusual accomplishments in the pioneering of new and developing fields of technology. The National Academies share a responsibility to advise the federal government on matters of science and technology. The expertise and credibility that the National Academy of Engineering brings to that task stem directly from the abilities, interests, and achievements of our members and foreign associates, our colleagues and friends, whose special gifts we remember in this book.

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