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Genetically Engineered Crops: Experiences and Prospects (2016)

Chapter: Appendix E: Invited Speakers Unavailable to Present to the Committee

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Invited Speakers Unavailable to Present to the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Genetically Engineered Crops: Experiences and Prospects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23395.
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Appendix E

Invited Speakers Unavailable to Present to the Committee

This list of invited speakers includes those who were unavailable to present to the committee, who declined the committee’s invitation, and who did not respond to the committee’s invitation.

David Andow, Distinguished McKnight University Professor, Department of Entomology, University of Minnesota

Rachel Bezner Kerr, Associate Professor of Development Sociology, Cornell University

Mark Bittman, Writer, The New York Times

Adam Bogdanove, Professor, Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology Section, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University

Edward Buckler, Research Geneticist, U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service

Daniel Cahoy, Professor of Business Law, Smeal College of Business, Pennsylvania State University

Amy Harmon, Journalist, The New York Times

Harry Klee, Professor, Horticultural Sciences Department and Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, University of Florida

Susan McCouch, Professor, Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics, Cornell University

Craig Mello, Distinguished Professor, Blais University Chair in Molecular Medicine and Codirector RNA Therapeutics Institute, University of Massachusetts Medical School

T. Erik Mirkov, Professor of Plant Molecular Virology, Texas A&M University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Invited Speakers Unavailable to Present to the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Genetically Engineered Crops: Experiences and Prospects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23395.
×

Bill Moseley, Professor and Department Chair of Geography, Macalester College

William Munro, Professor of Political Science, Illinois Wesleyan University

Kurt Nolte, Yuma County Extension Director, University of Arizona

Michael Pollan, Writer and Knight Professor of Science and Environmental Journalism, University of California–Berkeley

Daphne Preuss, CEO, Chromatin Inc.

José Sarukhán, Coordinador Nacional, Comisión Nacional para el Conocimiento y Uso de la Biodiversidad

Ron Phillips, Regents’ Professor and McKnight Presidential Chair in Genomics, University of Minnesota

Rachel Schurman, Professor of Sociology, University of Minnesota

Syngenta representative, Syngenta North America

Terry Torneten, Regional Extension Education Director, Iowa State University Extension

Sarah Zukoff, Assistant Professor of Entomology, Kansas State University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Invited Speakers Unavailable to Present to the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Genetically Engineered Crops: Experiences and Prospects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23395.
×
Page 553
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Invited Speakers Unavailable to Present to the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Genetically Engineered Crops: Experiences and Prospects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23395.
×
Page 554
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Genetically engineered (GE) crops were first introduced commercially in the 1990s. After two decades of production, some groups and individuals remain critical of the technology based on their concerns about possible adverse effects on human health, the environment, and ethical considerations. At the same time, others are concerned that the technology is not reaching its potential to improve human health and the environment because of stringent regulations and reduced public funding to develop products offering more benefits to society. While the debate about these and other questions related to the genetic engineering techniques of the first 20 years goes on, emerging genetic-engineering technologies are adding new complexities to the conversation.

Genetically Engineered Crops builds on previous related Academies reports published between 1987 and 2010 by undertaking a retrospective examination of the purported positive and adverse effects of GE crops and to anticipate what emerging genetic-engineering technologies hold for the future. This report indicates where there are uncertainties about the economic, agronomic, health, safety, or other impacts of GE crops and food, and makes recommendations to fill gaps in safety assessments, increase regulatory clarity, and improve innovations in and access to GE technology.

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