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Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary (2016)

Chapter: Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
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B

Speaker Biographical Sketches

David Chambers, D.Phil., is the deputy director for implementation science in the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, where he manages a team focusing on efforts to build and advance the field of implementation science through funding opportunity announcements, training mechanisms, dissemination platforms, and the enhancement of partnerships and networks to integrate research, practice, and policy.

From 2008 through the fall of 2014, Dr. Chambers served as chief of the Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology Branch (SRCEB) of the Division of Services and Intervention Research at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). He arrived at NIMH in 2001, brought to the institute to run the Dissemination and Implementation Research Program within SRCEB, where he continues to manage a portfolio of grants for studying the integration of scientific findings and effective clinical practices in mental health within real-world service settings. From 2006 to the fall of 2014, Dr. Chambers also served as associate director for dissemination and implementation research, leading National Institutes of Health (NIH) initiatives on the coordination of dissemination and implementation research in health, including a set of research announcements across 15 of the NIH institutes and centers, annual scientific conferences, and a summer training institute.

Prior to his arrival at NIH, Dr. Chambers worked as a member of a research team at Oxford University, where he studied national efforts to implement evidence-based practice within health care systems. He publishes on strategic research directions in implementation science and serves as a plenary speaker at numerous scientific conferences. He received his A.B. degree (with honors) in economics from Brown Univer-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×

sity in 1997, and an M.Sc. and a D.Phil. degree in management studies (organizational behavior) in 1998 and 2001, respectively, from Oxford University (UK).

Bernice Coleman, Ph.D., ACNP-BC, FAHA, FAAN, is a nurse scientist and nurse practitioner in the Heart Transplantation and Mechanical Circulatory Support (MCS) Programs at Cedars Sinai Medical Center. She has 25 years of experience as an advanced practice nurse caring for patients and families of patients with advanced heart disease.

As a clinician nurse scientist, her research was motivated by observations of disparity in survival after heart transplantation between African American and caucasian American recipients. She recently explored the role of inflammatory genes and their impact upon ethnic outcomes after transplantation. The findings from this research have demonstrated mutually exclusive candidate genes predictive of poor survival for African Americans compared to caucasian Americans after heart transplantation. The translation of genetics and genomics into practice will only be accomplished once care providers have the knowledge and appreciation of the powerful relevance “omics” as potential for changing outcomes.

Dr. Coleman holds a master of science degree from the Yale School of Nursing and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Nursing. Her postdoctoral work was conducted in the Histocompatibility Laboratory at Cedars Sinai Medical Center and the NIH/National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) Summer Genetics Institute. She has made numerous leadership contributions in professional organizations such as the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation, American Heart Association (AHA) Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Stroke, American Association of Critical Care Nurses, and the Academy of Nursing, and she served as AHA chair of the Western States Affiliates. She currently serves as a member of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation.

Debra Duquette, M.S., C.G.C., has served as a project manager/director on two Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Office of Public Health Genomics cooperative agreements and three CDC Division of Cancer Prevention and Control cooperative agreements with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services for public health genomics over the past 11 years. She is also the founder and chair of the Lynch Syndrome Screening Network, which is a consortium of more

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×

than 100 institutions working to promote universal screening for Lynch syndrome on all newly diagnosed colorectal and endometrial cancers. Since 2005 she has served as the project manager for the Michigan Sudden Cardiac Death of the Young Surveillance and Prevention project, and she has facilitated the Michigan Alliance for Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death of the Young. She serves on the executive steering committee for the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)funded American BRCA Outcomes & Utilization of Testing Network, on the advisory board of Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered, on the Institute of Medicine Ovarian Cancer Research Committee, and on the steering committee of eXamining Relevance of Articles for Young Survivors. She is a board-certified genetic counselor with more than 12 years of clinical experience, specifically counseling more than 8,000 Michigan families, giving her unique insight regarding clinical genetics and public health genomics.

William A. (Andy) Faucett, M.S., L.G.C., is the director of policy and education in the Office of the Chief Scientific Officer at Geisinger Health System and an investigator II in the Genomic Medicine Institute and the Autism and Developmental Medicine Institute. He directs community engagement and public education for Geisinger’s biobank, the MyCode® Community Health Initiative. His research focuses on oversight of genetic testing, health care provider education, genetic counseling, rare disease test translation, patient registries, and direct-to-consumer genetic testing. He leads the NIH-funded registry for the ClinGen project, GenomeConnect, and the ethical, legal, and social issues aspect of the NIH-funded Clinically Relevant Variant Resource section of ClinGen. He has a B.S. from the Baptist College at Charleston, South Carolina; an M.S. in human genetics from Sarah Lawrence College; and board certification from the American Board of Genetic Counseling. He has held positions at Emory; Baylor College of Medicine; Memorial Medical Center in Savannah, Georgia; and the CDC. He has been a member of The Personal Genome Project since 2009.

W. Gregory Feero, M.D., Ph.D., obtained his M.D./Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine’s Medical Scientist Training Program with a Ph.D. in human genetics. He then completed his residency in family medicine at the Maine–Dartmouth Family Medicine Residency Program in Augusta, Maine. After 5 years in practice in Maine, Dr. Feero accepted a position at the National Human Genome Research

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×

Institute (NHGRI) of the NIH as a senior advisor to the director for genomic medicine under Dr. Francis Collins and Dr. Alan Guttmacher. In this role, he played a key role in coordinating NHGRI’s activities related to family health history and was the planning chair for the NIH Consensus Development Program’s 2009 State of the Science Conference “Family History and Improving Health.” He also participated in efforts to help ensure the appropriate representation of family health history and genomic data in electronic health records. Additionally, as chief of the Genomic Healthcare Branch in the Office of the Director he oversaw efforts to advance genomics education for health professional disciplines including nurses, physician assistants, physicians, and pharmacists. In 2012, Dr. Feero stepped down from his position at NHGRI and continued on his role as faculty and research director at the Maine–Dartmouth Family Medicine Residency program. Currently he serves on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health and as a contributing editor for the Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr. Feero sees patients 4 days per week in Fairfield, Maine; is board certified in family medicine; and holds professional licenses in Maine and West Virginia. He has authored numerous peer-reviewed and invited publications.

Edward S. Kim, M.D., is the chair of solid tumor oncology and investigational therapeutics and the Donald S. Kim Distinguished Chair for Cancer Research at the Levine Cancer Institute, Carolinas HealthCare System in Charlotte, North Carolina. Dr. Kim was previously at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, where he was an associate professor of medicine, the chief of the Section of Head and Neck Medical Oncology, and the director of clinical research operations in the Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology.

Dr. Kim received his bachelor of science and medical degrees from the Honors Program in Medical Education (HPME) at Northwestern University in Chicago, Illinois, in 1996. Dr. Kim completed residency in internal medicine at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, 1996–1999, and his fellowship in medical oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1999–2001.

Dr. Kim studies novel targeted agents in the treatment and prevention settings and has expertise in lung, head, and neck as well as thymic cancers. He serves as a principal investigator on numerous clinical studies, including the Department of Defense Biomarker-based Approaches

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×

of Targeted Therapy for Lung Cancer Elimination (BATTLE), a personalized medicine program in lung cancer.

Dr. Kim serves as the chair of several national committees, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Cancer Research Committee, Early Phase Central Institutional Review Board, and International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC). He also serves on the editorial boards of Journal of Clinical Oncology, Clinical Cancer Research, and Clinical Lung Cancer and is a member of numerous associations and societies, including ASCO, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), SWOG, and IASLC. Dr. Kim is also the recipient of several awards, including the ASCO Young Investigators Award and the AACR Scholar in Training Award. He also has been the recipient of a V Foundation grant and a Department of Defense grant.

Dr. Kim is the author or co-author of more than 100 published articles, book chapters, reviews in journals such as Lancet, Lancet Oncology, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Cancer Discovery, Cancer, and Cancer Prevention Research, involving cancer therapeutics and prevention with chemotherapy and novel targeted agents, with particular emphases on lung cancer and head and neck cancer.

Stephen Kimmel, M.D., M.S.C.E., is a professor of medicine (cardiology) and epidemiology, the director of the Division of Epidemiology and the Clinical Epidemiology Unit, a senior scholar in the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, a senior fellow of the Center for Behavioral Health Research, a senior fellow of the Leonard David Institute, and a director of the Center for Therapeutic Effectiveness Research (CTER). Dr. Kimmel has performed pharmacogenetic and adherence research for the past 15 years. He was the coordinating center principal investigator (PI) for the Clarification of Optimal Anticoagulation through Genetics (COAG) trial. He is also the founding director of the CTER, which is dedicated to improving the use of existing therapeutics through research that aims to improve medication adherence and our understanding of genetics-based interventions. He is also the PI of the coordinating center for the Implementing GeNomIcs In pracTicE (IGNITE) Network, which was established to enhance and accelerate the use of genomic medicine by incorporating genomic information into clinical care and exploring methods for effective implementation, diffusion, and sustainability.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×

Debra G. B. Leonard, M.D., Ph.D., is professor and chair of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Vermont Medical Center in Burlington. She is an expert in the molecular pathology of genetic, cancer, and infectious diseases and in policy development for genomic medicine. Her M.D. and Ph.D. degrees were completed at the New York University School of Medicine, where she also did her postgraduate clinical training in anatomic pathology, including a surgical pathology fellowship. She is certified by the American Board of Pathology in anatomic pathology, and by the American Boards of Pathology and Medical Genetics in molecular genetic pathology. Currently, Dr. Leonard is a member of the Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, and previously served as a member of the Committee on the Review of Genomics-Based Tests for Predicting Outcomes in Clinical Trials. She is a fellow of the College of American Pathologists (CAP) and the chair of the CAP’s Personalized Healthcare Committee. Dr. Leonard is a past member of the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Genetics Health and Society (SACGHS) to Secretary Michael O. Leavitt and a past president and 2009 Leadership Award recipient of the Association for Molecular Pathology. She has spoken widely on various molecular pathology test services, the future of molecular pathology, the impact of gene patents on molecular pathology, and the practice of genomic medicine.

Marc LePage was appointed president and chief executive officer of Génome Québec in December 2011. He brings to the organization a wealth of experience in the innovation sector and venture capital, in addition to a broad network of international contacts. One of his major mandates as president and CEO is to reach new agreements in a bid to diversify sources of funding.

He is an expert in international partnerships and, since 2009, served as special advisor, climate change and energy for the Embassy of Canada in Washington, DC. He previously worked as consul general at the Canadian Consulate in San Francisco/Silicon Valley.

Mr. LePage was also one of the pioneers behind the founding of Genome Canada in 2000. During his tenure as executive vice president of corporate development, he made a significant contribution to the development of genomics in Canada.

From 1994 to 2000, he worked as the director of business development for the Medical Research Council, where he was in charge of build-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×

ing international partnerships with the pharmaceutical industry, venture capital, and foundations.

Mr. LePage is a member of the board and the governance committee of the Québec Network for Personalized Health Care. He also sits on the board of Canada World Youth.

Robert S. McDonough, M.D., is senior director for clinical policy research and development for Aetna, where he is responsible for developing Aetna’s medical policies. He is co-chairman of Aetna’s Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee and chairman of Aetna’s Policy and Plan Design Committee. He is a member of the Medicare Evidence Development and Coverage Advisory Committee. He has special interests in preventive health services, technology assessment, and outcomes research.

He is former senior analyst and project director with the health program of the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment. He is a graduate of Duke University School of Medicine and School of Law (J.D.) and has a master’s degree in policy analysis from Duke’s Sanford Institute of Public Policy. He completed an internship in internal medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, and is a fellow of the American College of Legal Medicine.

Brian S. Mittman, Ph.D., is a senior scientist at the Veterans Affairs (VA) Center for Implementation Practice and Research Support (Department of Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System) and a senior research scientist at the Kaiser Permanente Southern California Department of Research and Evaluation. He has additional affiliations at RAND and at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), where he co-leads the UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) Implementation and Improvement Science Initiative.

Dr. Mittman convened the planning committee that launched the journal Implementation Science and served as co-editor in chief from 2005 to 2012. He was a member of the Forum on the Science of Quality Improvement and Implementation at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, and chaired the NIH Special Emphasis Panel on Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health in 2007 and 2010. He directed the VA’s Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI) from 2002 to 2004 and established the VA QUERI implementation research “resource center,” the Center for VA Implementation Research and Practice Support, in 2008. He currently serves on the Methodology Committee for PCORI, the Association of American Med-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×

ical Colleges Advisory Panel on Research, the AcademyHealth Methods Council and Education Council, and on advisory boards for several additional research programs in implementation science in the United States and abroad.

Mary Norton, M.D., is a professor of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive sciences at the University of California, San Francisco, and vice chair of clinical and translational genetics and genomics in her department. She is a practicing perinatologist and clinical geneticist and is board certified in maternal fetal medicine as well as clinical genetics. She has been involved in clinical research and clinical trials throughout her academic career and has particular interest in studies focused on pregnancy, prenatal diagnosis, and perinatal genetics.

Her experience in clinical research is extensive and varied, and she has collaborated in numerous multi-center trials. She was the principal investigator (PI) of the Maternal Fetal Medicine Network site at Stanford University, which she implemented at that center. She recently completed a multicenter trial of cell-free DNA for prenatal aneuploidy detection. This was an international study involving numerous sites that recruited more than 18,000 participants in just over 1 year; the primary manuscript was published in the New England Journal of Medicine. She was also a co-investigator for another recently completed National Institute of Child Health and Human Development–sponsored multicenter trial as the primary co-PI; the primary manuscript was published in JAMA and focused on patient education and decision making surrounding prenatal genetic testing. She has been, or currently is, on several national committees that are involved in national guidelines regarding genetic testing, including the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Committee on Genetics and the Society for Maternal–Fetal Medicine publications committee. She is the president-elect of the Society for Maternal–Fetal Medicine and the current president of the Perinatal Quality Foundation, two important societies working actively in the promotion of quality maternal fetal care. She has completed several studies in collaboration with the California Genetic Disease Screening Program as well as with Kaiser Permanente.

Jane Perlmutter, Ph.D., M.B.A., is a long-term cancer survivor and has been involved in a number of organizations committed to educating the public on cancer, supporting people affected by it, and eradicating the disease. She is an advocate representative in several clinical trials con-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×

sortia, multi-institutional grants, clinical guideline committees, grant review panels, National Cancer Institute steering and working groups, Innovation in Medical Evidence Development and Surveillance steering committee, PCORI patient engagement advisory panel, and Committee on Policy Issues in the Clinical Development and Use of Biomarkers for Molecularly Targeted Therapies at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She has also been an active member of the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative. She is especially committed to training less experienced patient advocates, has written articles and tutorials on this topic, and is often involved in advocate training.

Dr. Perlmutter has a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology and master’s degrees in educational psychology and computer and information science as well as an M.B.A. She started her career as an experimental cognitive psychologist at the University of Texas in Austin and spent most of her career at Bell Labs. She has run the Bell Technical Training Center and held an officer position in DeVry Inc., a publicly traded for-profit higher education company. She currently runs her own consulting company—Gemini Group. Her consulting focuses on process improvement for small businesses, not-for-profits, and institutions of higher learning.

Toni Pollin, Ph.D., is a human geneticist and board-certified genetic counselor. Her research interests lie in mapping genes involved in susceptibility to type 2 diabetes and related complications, particularly related to lipids and cardiovascular disease, and clinical translation of emerging genetics findings into clinical uses. Her current major research efforts involve an National Human Genome Research Institute–funded implementation study of a program designed to screen for, diagnose, and promote individualized therapy for highly penetrant genetic forms of diabetes; studying gene x lifestyle/pharmaceutical interactions in the Diabetes Prevention Program (a multi-center, multi-ethnic clinical trial showing reduction in diabetes incidence using metformin or intensive lifestyle changes); characterizing the metabolic and cardioprotective effects of inborn apolipoprotein C-III deficiency resulting from a founder mutation in the Old Order Amish; and the genetics and pharmacogenetics of diabetes in children and adolescents in the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) Study. She also leads the Amish Wellness Study, a study designed to assemble a community-based Amish biobank while providing basic health screening to the Lancaster Amish population, and provides genetic analysis

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×

expertise to colleagues across campus. She has published more than 70 peer-reviewed articles and several book chapters and review articles.

Dr. Pollin teaches formally in the graduate school, medical school, and genetic counseling training program at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and provides research mentorship to students in these programs along with undergraduate students, clinical and postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty. She is actively involved in the education of genetic and other health care providers regarding the genetics of diabetes at both the local and national levels, having lectured on the subject to the National Society of Genetic Counselors, American Diabetes Association, and physicians, nurses, and geneticists at the university and other hospitals in the Baltimore area. Finally, she serves on the NIH Clinical and Integrative Cardiovascular Sciences Scientific Review Group, American Diabetes Association Research Grant Review Committee, and National Society of Genetic Counselors Practice Guidelines Committee, and she has been an invited participant in several NIH workshops related to genetics and genomic medicine and research.

Alexandra Shields, Ph.D., is the director of the Harvard/Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Center on Genomics, Vulnerable Populations, and Health Disparities; an associate professor of medicine at the Harvard Medical School; an associate in health policy at MGH; and associate faculty in molecular and population genetics at the Broad Institute. Dr. Shields’ work addresses the challenges of clinical integration of new genomic medicine and technologies into clinical practice, with a particular focus on the impact of these changes on minority and underserved populations. She has conducted several national surveys addressing the preparedness of primary care physicians to incorporate genomic medicine into practice more generally, access to established genetic tests at safety net provider sites, and consumers’ willingness to undergo genetic testing. Dr. Shields also studies important ethical aspects of genomics research design, including the use of race constructs in genomics research and the inclusion of environmental measures most important to understanding health disparities in gene–environment interaction studies. Dr. Shields has authored more than 40 peer-reviewed publications; co-directs the Health Disparities Research Program of the Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center; is an executive committee member of the DanaFarber/Harvard Cancer Center’s Reduction of Cancer Risk and Disparities Program; and serves on advisory boards of several National Institutes of Health and university-based research initiatives addressing genomics

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×

and health disparities. She holds a Ph.D. in health policy from Brandeis University, where she was a Pew Health Policy Scholar, as well as a B.A. (summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa) and an M.A. (with distinction) in systematic theology from Boston College.

Consuelo H. Wilkins, M.D., M.S.C.I., is the executive director of the Meharry–Vanderbilt Alliance, a strategic partnership between Meharry Medical College and Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. Her primary responsibilities include developing and supporting collaborative initiatives and programs in biomedical research, community engagement, and interprofessional learning. She holds appointments as an associate professor of medicine at both Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and Meharry Medical College. As co-director of the Meharry–Vanderbilt Community Engaged Research Core in the Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical and Translational Science, she brings together academic researchers and community members to improve community health and health care through community-engaged research. Dr. Wilkins is widely recognized for her work in stakeholder engagement and is the principal investigator of a PCORI research award focused on improving patient engagement and understanding its impact on research.

Dr. Wilkins’ prior research has focused on understanding the complex intersection between cognitive impairment, frailty, and depression. Prior to joining the faculty at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in 2012, Dr. Wilkins was an associate professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, with secondary appointments in psychiatry and surgery (public health sciences) at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. She served as founding director of the Center for Community Health and Partnerships in the Institute for Public Health, co-director of the Center for Community Engaged Research in the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) consortium, and director of Our Community, Our Health, a collaborative program with Saint Louis University to disseminate culturally relevant health information and facilitate community-academic partnerships to address health disparities.

Dr. Wilkins serves on numerous national committees and boards, including the CTSA Consortium Collaboration/Engagement Domain Task Force (lead team); PCORI Advisory Panel on Clinical Trials Subcommittee on Recruitment, Accrual, and Retention; PCORnet Patient and Consumer Engagement Task Force (co-chair); and the National Institute on Aging Task Force for Diversity in Scholar Development in Aging/Neurocognitive Disease and Research Recruitment.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×

Dr. Wilkins earned a bachelor of science in microbiology (magna cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa) and a doctor of medicine from Howard University. She completed residency training in internal medicine at Duke University Medical Center and a geriatric medicine fellowship at Washington University School of Medicine/Barnes-Jewish Hospital. Following her medical training, Dr. Wilkins earned a master of science in clinical investigation from Washington University School of Medicine.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×
Page 84
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×
Page 85
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×
Page 86
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×
Page 87
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×
Page 88
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×
Page 89
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic Medicine: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23403.
×
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Although it is becoming increasingly more common for clinicians to use genomic data in their practices for disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment, the process of integrating genomic data into the practice of medicine has been a slow and challenging one. Some of the major barriers impeding the incorporation of new genomic technology into clinical practice are: the difficulty of changing routine medical practices to account for the use of genetic testing, the limited knowledge of patients and providers about genomic medicine, assessing sufficient evidence to support the use of genetic tests, privacy and data security issues, and uncertainty about reimbursement.

The field of implementation science may be able to provide insights concerning efficient ways to incorporate genomic applications into routine clinical practice. The focus of implementation science studies is to identify integration bottlenecks and optimal approaches for a given setting and ultimately to promote the up-take of research findings. To explore the potential of implementation science to improve the integration of genomics into medicine, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine held a workshop in Washington, DC, in November 2015. Participants explored the challenges and opportunities of integrating genomic advances into the clinic through the lens of implementation science. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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