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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Meeting 1 Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Eliminating the Public Health Problem of Hepatitis B and C in the United States: Phase One Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23407.
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A

Committee Meeting 1 Agenda

COMMITTEE ON A NATIONAL STRATEGY FOR THE ELIMINATION OF HEPATITIS B AND C

The Keck Center, 500 Fifth Street NW
Washington, DC 20001

November 30, 2015
Room 105

THE CHARGE TO THE COMMITTEE AND PHASE 1 REPORT

10:45-11:30 The Charge to the Committee
John Ward, Director, Office of Viral Hepatitis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Nadine Gracia, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Minority Health and Director, Office of Minority Health, Department of Health and Human Services
11:30-12:00 Study Timeline
Brian Strom, Committee Chair
12:00-1:00 Lunch
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Meeting 1 Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Eliminating the Public Health Problem of Hepatitis B and C in the United States: Phase One Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23407.
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OVERVIEW OF HBV AND LOGISTICAL AND SOCIAL ASPECTS OF ELIMINATION

1:00-1:30 Overview of Epidemiology and Natural History of Hepatitis B
Jules Dienstag, Carl W. Walter Professor Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital
1:30-2:00 Gaps in Hepatitis B Monitoring and Screening
Mandana Khalili, Professor of Clinical Medicine, University of California, San Francisco
2:00-2:30 The Costs and Logistics of Community HBV Screening Programs
Chari Cohen, Director of Public Health, Hepatitis B Foundation
2:30-2:45 Break
2:45-3:15 The Health Systems Obstacles to Hepatitis B Elimination
Robert Gish, Principal, Robert Gish Consultants, LLC
3:15-3:45 Management of the Chronic Hepatitis B Patient in Alaska
Brian McMahon, Medical and Research Director, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (by video)
3:45-5:00 Panel Discussion Social and Logistical Feasibility of Eliminating HBV
Art Reingold, Moderator
  • Chari Cohen, Director of Public Health, Hepatitis B Foundation
  • Jules Dienstag, Carl W. Walter Professor Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Adrian DiBesceglie, Co-Director, Saint Louis University Liver Center (by phone)
  • Robert Gish, Principal, Robert Gish Consultants, LLC
  • Brian McMahon, Medical and Research Director, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (by video)
5:15 Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Meeting 1 Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Eliminating the Public Health Problem of Hepatitis B and C in the United States: Phase One Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23407.
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December 1, 2015
Room 100

SCIENTIFIC AND MEDICAL ASPECTS OF ELIMINATION

9:00-9:15 Welcome and Meeting Overview
Brian Strom, Committee Chair
9:15-9:45 Medical Management of Hepatitis B
Anna Lok, Alice Lohrman Andrews Research Professor, University of Michigan Health System
9:45-10:15 Hepatitis B Reactivation
Rohit Loomba, Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Diego
10:15-10:30 Break
10:30-11:00 Immunology of Hepatitis B
Kyong-Mi Chang, Associate Chief of Staff for Research and Development, Corporal Michael J. Crescenz Veterans Affairs Medical Center
11:00-11:30 Virology of Hepatitis B
T. Jake Liang, Chief of Liver Diseases Branch, Deputy Director of Translational Research, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health
11:30-12:30 Panel Discussion Scientific and Clinical Feasibility of Eliminating HBV
Randy Mayer, Moderator
  • Kyong-Mi Chang, Associate Chief of Staff for Research and Development, Corporal Michael J. Crescenz Veterans Affairs Medical Center
  • T. Jake Liang, Chief of Liver Diseases Branch, Deputy Director of Translational Research, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Meeting 1 Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Eliminating the Public Health Problem of Hepatitis B and C in the United States: Phase One Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23407.
×
  • Anna Lok, Alice Lohrman Andrews Research Professor, University of Michigan Health System
  • Rohit Loomba, Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Diego
12:30 Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Meeting 1 Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Eliminating the Public Health Problem of Hepatitis B and C in the United States: Phase One Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23407.
×
Page 139
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Meeting 1 Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Eliminating the Public Health Problem of Hepatitis B and C in the United States: Phase One Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23407.
×
Page 140
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Meeting 1 Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Eliminating the Public Health Problem of Hepatitis B and C in the United States: Phase One Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23407.
×
Page 141
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Meeting 1 Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Eliminating the Public Health Problem of Hepatitis B and C in the United States: Phase One Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23407.
×
Page 142
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Eliminating the Public Health Problem of Hepatitis B and C in the United States: Phase One Report Get This Book
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Hepatitis B and C cause most cases of hepatitis in the United States and the world. The two diseases account for about a million deaths a year and 78 percent of world’s hepatocellular carcinoma and more than half of all fatal cirrhosis. In 2013 viral hepatitis, of which hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are the most common types, surpassed HIV and AIDS to become the seventh leading cause of death worldwide.

The world now has the tools to prevent hepatitis B and cure hepatitis C. Perfect vaccination could eradicate HBV, but it would take two generations at least. In the meantime, there is no cure for the millions of people already infected. Conversely, there is no vaccine for HCV, but new direct-acting antivirals can cure 95 percent of chronic infections, though these drugs are unlikely to reach all chronically-infected people anytime soon. This report, the first of two, examines the feasibility of hepatitis B and C elimination in the United States and identifies critical success factors. The phase two report will outline a strategy for meeting the elimination goals discussed in this report.

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