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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting 2 Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Eliminating the Public Health Problem of Hepatitis B and C in the United States: Phase One Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23407.
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B

Committee Meeting 2 Agenda

COMMITTEE ON A NATIONAL STRATEGY FOR THE ELIMINATION OF HEPATITIS B AND C

The Keck Center, 500 Fifth Street NW
Washington, DC 20001

December 16, 2015
Room 105

THE SCIENTIFIC AND CLINICAL FEASIBILITY OF ELIMINATING HCV

8:45-9:00 Welcome and Introductions
Brian Strom,Committee Chair
9:00-9:30 The Epidemiology and Natural History of Hepatitis C Virus
David Thomas,Professor of Medicine and Director of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
9:30-10:00 Screening and Clinical Management of Hepatitis C
Marc Ghany,Staff Clinician, Liver Diseases Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting 2 Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Eliminating the Public Health Problem of Hepatitis B and C in the United States: Phase One Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23407.
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10:00-10:30 Treatment of Hepatitis C
Jay Hoofnagle,Director, Liver Disease Research Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health
10:30-10:45 Break
10:45-11:15 Prevalence of HCV and a Framework for Understanding Cost-Effectiveness
Arthur Kim,Director Viral Hepatitis Clinic, Massachusetts General Hospital
11:15-12:30 Panel Discussion on the Scientific and Clinical Feasibility of Eliminating HCV
  • Stuart Ray,Moderator
  • David Thomas,Professor of Medicine and Director of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • Marc Ghany,Staff Clinician, Liver Diseases Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health
  • Jay Hoofnagle,Deputy Director, Liver Disease Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health
  • Arthur Kim,Director Viral Hepatitis Clinic, Massachusetts General Hospital

THE LOGISTICAL AND SOCIAL FEASIBILITY OF ELIMINATING HCV

1:30-2:00 Price and Access to Hepatitis C Drugs
Camilla Graham,Assistant Professor of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
2:00-2:30 The National Infrastructure for Hepatitis C: Is There Anyone Home?
Daniel O’Connell,Director, New York State Department of Health AIDS Institute
2:30-2:45 Break
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting 2 Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Eliminating the Public Health Problem of Hepatitis B and C in the United States: Phase One Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23407.
×
2:45-3:15 The Feasibility of Eliminating Hepatitis C Among Injection Drug Users
Brian Edlin,Senior Principal Investigator, Institute for Infectious Disease Research National Development and Research Institutes
3:15-3:45 The Logistics of Reaching the Hepatitis C Patient in Corrections
Lara Strick,Infectious Disease Specialist, Washington State Department of Corrections (by video)
3:45-5:00 Panel Discussion on the Logistical and Social Feasibility of Eliminating HCV
Paul Kuehnert, Moderator
  • Camilla Graham,Assistant Professor of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
  • Brian Edlin,Senior Principal Investigator, Institute for Infectious Disease Research National Development and Research Institutes
  • Daniel O’Connell,Director, New York State Department of Health AIDS Institute
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting 2 Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Eliminating the Public Health Problem of Hepatitis B and C in the United States: Phase One Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23407.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting 2 Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Eliminating the Public Health Problem of Hepatitis B and C in the United States: Phase One Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23407.
×
Page 143
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting 2 Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Eliminating the Public Health Problem of Hepatitis B and C in the United States: Phase One Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23407.
×
Page 144
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting 2 Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Eliminating the Public Health Problem of Hepatitis B and C in the United States: Phase One Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23407.
×
Page 145
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting 2 Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Eliminating the Public Health Problem of Hepatitis B and C in the United States: Phase One Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23407.
×
Page 146
Next: Appendix C: Committee Biographies »
Eliminating the Public Health Problem of Hepatitis B and C in the United States: Phase One Report Get This Book
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Hepatitis B and C cause most cases of hepatitis in the United States and the world. The two diseases account for about a million deaths a year and 78 percent of world’s hepatocellular carcinoma and more than half of all fatal cirrhosis. In 2013 viral hepatitis, of which hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are the most common types, surpassed HIV and AIDS to become the seventh leading cause of death worldwide.

The world now has the tools to prevent hepatitis B and cure hepatitis C. Perfect vaccination could eradicate HBV, but it would take two generations at least. In the meantime, there is no cure for the millions of people already infected. Conversely, there is no vaccine for HCV, but new direct-acting antivirals can cure 95 percent of chronic infections, though these drugs are unlikely to reach all chronically-infected people anytime soon. This report, the first of two, examines the feasibility of hepatitis B and C elimination in the United States and identifies critical success factors. The phase two report will outline a strategy for meeting the elimination goals discussed in this report.

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