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Evaluation of the Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (2017)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Evaluation of the Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23409.
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Appendix B

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

CHRISTOPHER EDLEY, JR. (Chair) is the honorable William H. Orrick, Jr., distinguished professor and faculty director at the Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute on Law and Social Policy at the School of Law of the University of California, Berkeley, where he previously served as dean. Earlier, he was a professor at Harvard Law School. His academic work is in administrative law, civil rights, education policy, and, generally, domestic public policy. His public policy work has included policy and budget positions under Presidents Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton. He also served as a senior policy adviser in the presidential campaign of Barack Obama and on the transition board, with responsibility for education, immigration, and health. More recently, he cochaired the congressionally chartered National Commission on Education Equity and Excellence, which was charged to revisit the 1983 report, A Nation at Risk, and recommend future directions for reform. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Public Administration, the Council of Foreign Relations, and the Gates Foundation’s National Programs Advisory Panel. He has a B.A. in mathematics from Swarthmore College, an M.A. from the Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

PETER AFFLERBACH is a professor of reading in the Department of Teaching and Learning, Policy and Leadership in the College of Education at the University of Maryland. His early career was as a teacher, first in grades K-6, then in remedial reading and writing in junior high

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Evaluation of the Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23409.
×

school, and then in high school English. His research interests focus on reading assessment, reading comprehension strategies, and the verbal reporting methodology, especially aspects of individual differences that are sometimes neglected in reading theory and practice, including motivation and engagement, metacognition, student self-efficacy and self-concept, and epistemic beliefs. He is a long-time member of the Standing Reading Committee of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), and he was a member of the 2009 NAEP Reading Framework Committee and of the Feedback Committee for the Common Core State Standards/English Language Arts. He has served on numerous committees and panels for the Programme for International Student Assessment, the National Assessment of Adult Literacy, and the National Accessible Reading Assessment Projects. He is an elected member of the International Reading Association’s Reading Hall of Fame. He has an M.S. in developmental reading and a Ph.D. in reading psychology from the State University of New York at Albany.

SYBILLA BECKMANN is the Josiah Meigs distinguished teaching professor and director of the Mathematicians Educating Future Teachers Program in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Georgia. Previously, she was a J.W. Gibbs instructor of mathematics at Yale University. Her major current research interests are in mathematical cognition, the mathematical education of teachers, and mathematics content from prekindergarten through grade 8. She also works on helping college faculty learn to teach mathematics for elementary and middle grade teachers. She served as a member of the writing team for mathematics curriculum for prekindergarten through grade 8 for the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, on the development of several state mathematics standards, and as a member of the mathematics writing team for the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. She is currently a member of the U.S. National Commission on Mathematics Instruction. She is the recipient of several teaching awards from the University of Georgia and of the Louise Hay Award for Contributions to Mathematics Education from the Association for Women in Mathematics. She has a Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Pennsylvania.

H. RUSSELL BERNARD is a research professor of anthropology and director of the Institute for Social Science Research at Arizona State University. He is also professor emeritus of anthropology at the University of Florida. Previously, he has taught or done research at other U.S. universities and at universities in Greece, Japan, and Germany. He has also conducted field research in Greece, Mexico, and the United States. His areas of research include technology and social change, language death, and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Evaluation of the Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23409.
×

social network analysis. He has participated for many years in summer courses, sponsored by the U.S. National Science Foundation, on research methods and research design. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and he is a recipient of the Franz Boas Award from the American Anthropological Association. He has a Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

KARLA EGAN is currently an independent consultant. Previously, she was an associate with the National Center for the Improvement of Educational Assessment, which provides technical support to national, state, and local education agencies on issues related to the design, development, implementation, and documentation of general assessments and alternate assessments. Before that, she was a senior research scientist for CTB/McGraw-Hill. Her work focuses in particular on standard setting, achievement-level descriptors, and test security. She also has worked on developing achievement-level descriptions and setting standards for the alternative assessments given to students with significant learning disabilities. She has designed and led more than 40 standard setting workshops, created a nationally recognized framework to develop achievement-level descriptors, and implemented almost all major standard setting methods. She has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

DAVID J. FRANCIS is the Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen distinguished university chair and director of the Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics at the University of Houston. At the university, he also directs the Center for Research on Educational Achievement and Teaching of English-Language Learners and the English-language learners strand of the Center on Instruction. His research is focused on language and literacy development in Spanish-speaking children, reading and reading disabilities, attention problems, developmental consequences of brain injuries and birth defects, and adolescent alcohol abuse. He is a member of the Independent Review Panel for the National Assessment of Title I, a former chair of the Advisory Council on Education Statistics, and a member of the Technical Advisory Group of the What Works Clearinghouse, and a former member of the National Literacy Panel for Language Minority Children and Youth. He is a recipient of the Albert J. Harris Award from the International Reading Association and several awards from the University of Houston for career accomplishments in research, teaching, and service. He has a B.S. in psychology from Kalamazoo College and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in clinical neuropsychology from the University of Houston.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Evaluation of the Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23409.
×

MARGARET E. GOERTZ is a professor emerita of education policy and a senior researcher at the Consortium for Policy Research in Education in the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. Previously, she taught at the Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University and was executive director of the Education Policy Research Division of Educational Testing Service. She has conducted research and led national and state-level studies on education policy and policy implementation, including state and local implementation of Title I, the No Child Left Behind Act, and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act; the design and implementation of standards-based reform by state education agencies, school districts, and elementary and secondary schools; and the interface between federal and state accountability and school improvement policies. Most recently, she completed a study of how state education agencies are organized to manage and use evidence in their policies or practices to improve low-performing schools. She has a Ph.D. in social science from Syracuse University.

LAURA HAMILTON is a senior behavioral scientist and associate director for education at the RAND Corporation, a professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School, and an adjunct faculty member in the Learning Sciences and Policy program at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research addresses educational assessment, accountability, the measurement and evaluation of instruction and school leadership, the use of data for instructional decision making, and evaluation of technology-based curriculum reforms. She has focused on the collection and analysis of interview, focus group, survey, and student outcome data, particularly in several large multisite studies. Most recently, she led an investigation of how districts and charter management organizations are implementing new teacher and principal evaluation and compensation reforms and an evaluation of personalized-learning initiatives. She serves on several state and national panels on topics related to assessment, accountability, educator evaluation, and data use and recently served as a member of the committee that revised the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing. She has an M.S. in statistics and a Ph.D. in educational psychology from Stanford University.

BRIAN JUNKER is a professor in the Department of Statistics at Carnegie Mellon University. His major interest is in highly multivariate data that show an interesting and interpretable dependence structure, especially when it reveals connections among ideas in seemingly unrelated fields. He is also interested in capture-recapture models for estimating the size of wildlife and human populations, which share many features with models for multiple-choice tests. He has studied latent variable models used in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Evaluation of the Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23409.
×

the design and analysis of standardized tests such as the SAT and the Graduate Records Examination; in the analysis of small-scale experiments in psychology and psychiatry; and in the analysis of large-scale educational surveys such as the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Some of his recent work aims to characterize the dependence structure implied by these models, so that one can quickly decide whether they are the right tool for a particular problem. He has a B.A. in mathematics from the University of Minnesota and an M.S. in mathematics and a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Illinois.

JUDITH KOENIG (Study Director) is on the staff of the Board on Testing and Assessment of the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine, where she directs measurement-related studies designed to inform education policy. Her work has included other studies on the National Assessment for Educational Progress; teacher licensure and advanced-level certification; inclusion of special-needs students and English-language learners in assessment programs; setting standards for the National Assessment of Adult Literacy; assessing 21st-century skills; and using value-added methods for evaluating schools and teachers. Previously, she worked at the Association of American Medical Colleges and as a special education teacher and diagnostician. She has a B.A. in elementary and special education from Michigan State University, an M.A. in psychology from George Mason University, and a Ph.D. in educational measurement, statistics, and evaluation from the University of Maryland.

SUZANNE LANE is a professor in the research methodology program at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research and professional interests are in educational measurement and testing, with a focus on technical and validity issues in large-scale assessment programs and the effectiveness of education and accountability programs. She has served as president of the National Council on Measurement in Education and on its Joint Committee for the Revision of the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing. She also served on the Management Committee for the next revision of the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing published in 2014. She has also served as vice president of the measurement and research methodology division of the American Educational Research Association. She has been on a number of technical advisory committees for the College Board, Educational Testing Service, the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, the U.S. Department of Education’s evaluation of the National Assessment of Educational Progress and its technical review panel for the Race to the Top, and the National Center for Educational Outcomes. She has a Ph.D. in educational psychology from the University of Arizona.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Evaluation of the Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23409.
×

SHARON J. LEWIS recently retired from the position of director of research for the Council of the Great City Schools in Washington, D.C., which works to improve teaching and learning in the nation’s urban schools as well as help develop education policy. She has previously worked as a national education consultant. Earlier, she was assistant superintendent of research, development, and coordination with the Detroit Public Schools. She has served on numerous NAS committees, most recently an evaluation of D.C. public schools, and is currently a member of the Board on Testing and Assessment. Her work focuses on improving learning for disadvantaged and at-risk students. She has an M.A. in educational research from Wayne State University.

BERNARD L. MADISON is a professor in the Department of Mathematical Sciences at the University of Arkansas, where he earlier served as dean of the Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences. Previously, he was at Louisiana State University. His major current research interests are in articulation, assessment, quantitative literacy, and teacher education. Previously, he structured and directed the program “Mathematical Sciences in the Year 2000” at the National Research Council, including the national colloquium, Calculus for a New Century. He has worked extensively with the calculus program of the College Board and as chair of its Mathematics Academic Advisory Committee. He also served on the National Commission on the Future of the Advanced Placement Program and as a member of the writing team for the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. He has a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and physics from Western Kentucky University and master’s and doctoral degrees in mathematics from the University of Kentucky.

SCOTT NORTON is strategic initiative director of standards, assessment, and accountability at the Council of Chief State School Officers. In this role, he works with states to implement the Common Core State Standards and Assessments and to create and implement new student-focused accountability systems. The team is also responsible for the State Collaboratives on Assessment and Student Standards, the National Conference on Student Assessment, and collaborative work with the assessment consortia. Previously, he served as the assistant superintendent of the Office of Standards, Assessments, and Accountability at the Louisiana Department of Education, where his responsibilities included the implementation of content standards and development of the Louisiana Comprehensive Curriculum as well as the state’s transition to full implementation of the Common Core State Standards. He has a Ph.D. in educational administration and supervision from Louisiana State University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Evaluation of the Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23409.
×

SHARON VAUGHN is the H.E. Hartfelder/Southland Corp. Regents chair and executive director of The Meadows Center for Preventing Educational Risk at the University of Texas. Previously, she held positions at the University of Miami and the University of New Hampshire and as a classroom teacher in public schools in Arizona and Missouri. Her research focuses on strategies and educational interventions in teaching reading to students who are at risk, particularly students with learning difficulties and behavior problems and students who are English-language learners. Her work spans from the middle grades to the secondary grades. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Council for Exceptional Children research award and faculty and research awards from the University of Texas. She has a B.S. in education from the University of Missouri and an M.Ed. in education and a Ph.D. in education and child development from the University of Arizona.

JORDYN WHITE is a program officer for the Committee on National Statistics (CNSTAT). Currently she is the study director for a workshop sponsored by the Office of Minority Health on Improving Collection of Criminal Justice System Involvement Indicators in Population Health Data Collections. She is also currently working on the Standing Committee on Reengineering Census Operations and the Panel to Modernize the Nation’s Crime Statistics. She joined CNSTAT after having worked 5 years at the U.S. Census Bureau; she first worked on the methodology, design, implementation, and production of the American Community Survey, and later served on the 2020 Census Non-Response Follow-Up development and operations planning team. She has a B.S. in psychology from the University of Pittsburgh and an M.S. in criminal justice from St. Joseph’s University.

LAURESS WISE is a principal scientist at the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO), where he previously served as president. At HumRRO, he currently directs a project to provide quality assurance for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). His work has ranged broadly in educational research and educational policy and assessment. He serves on technical advisory committees for the Hawaii, Oklahoma, and Rhode Island departments of education, and is currently directing the independent evaluation of California’s new high school exit exam. He recently served as cochair for the committee that revised the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing of the American Education Research Association, the American Psychological Association, and the National Council on Measurement in Education, and he is currently

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Evaluation of the Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23409.
×

serving as president of the National Council of Measurement in Education. He previously served on the Panel for the Evaluation of the NAEP Trial State Assessment of the National Academy of Education. He has a Ph.D. in mathematical psychology from the University of California, Berkeley.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Evaluation of the Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23409.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Evaluation of the Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23409.
×
Page 266
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Evaluation of the Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23409.
×
Page 267
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Evaluation of the Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23409.
×
Page 268
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Evaluation of the Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23409.
×
Page 269
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Evaluation of the Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23409.
×
Page 270
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Evaluation of the Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23409.
×
Page 271
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Evaluation of the Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23409.
×
Page 272
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Since 1969, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) has been providing policymakers, educators, and the public with reports on academic performance and progress of the nation’s students. The assessment is given periodically in a variety of subjects: mathematics, reading, writing, science, the arts, civics, economics, geography, U.S. history, and technology and engineering literacy. NAEP is given to representative samples of students across the U.S. to assess the educational progress of the nation as a whole.

Since 1992, NAEP results have been reported in relation to three achievement levels: basic, proficient, and advanced. However, the use of achievement levels has provoked controversy and disagreement, and evaluators have identified numerous concerns. This publication evaluates the NAEP student achievement levels in reading and mathematics in grades 4, 8, and 12 to determine whether the achievement levels are reasonable, reliable, valid, and informative to the public, and recommends ways that the setting and use of achievement levels can be improved.

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