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Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff (2016)

Chapter: Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script

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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Module 1 Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

54 CHAPTER 4: MODULE 1 INSTRUCTOR MSPOWERPOINT SLIDES AND SCRIPT

9/1/2015 55 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide Welcome to the “Incident Command System for Field‐Level Transportation Supervisors and Staff” course. I am [name and affiliation]. My co‐instructor is [name and affiliation]. Today’s class is supported by the [sponsoring agency]. Be sure to sign in to get credit for the class in your training record. Let’s take a few minutes to look at the contents of your student manual. The first section is your copy of the MSPowerPoint slides from today. This book is your personal reference, so write notes in it throughout the class as ideas occur to you about the application of ICS in your work environment. Starting at page 105 you will find guidance on developing an appropriate emergency kit for your daily work vehicle, emphasizing water and personal medications. The second section is a guide to developing a professional drive‐away kit to support you during an extended emergency in the field. Starting at page 110 is a collection of fliers that provide guidance on your role as a disaster service worker, and steps you can take to prepare your family to be safe is an emergency when you are not at home. We will discuss these later. Starting at page 130 is a glossary and acronym list, information about today’s sponsoring agency, and the brief biographies of the instructors.

9/1/2015 56 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide Thank you for coming to the “ICS for Transportation” class today. In the first segment we will describe the role of transportation in emergencies. Next we will conduct a brief review of the history, principles and terminology used in the Incident Command System. Then we will describe the use of the Incident Command System by State Transportation Agency personnel to create a safe, integrated and efficient emergency response, regardless of the triggering event. Finally some practical application of ICS principles to State Transportation Agency work will be described, and some innovative tools which you have been given today will be reviewed. It is expected that all students have completed the Incident Command System 100 course, and the National Incident Management System 700 course. Therefore the general ICS review will be brief. Remember that there is a glossary and acronym list available at the back of the student manual for your use in recalling the terminology that we will be using. Raise you hand at any time if the instructor uses terminology that is unclear to you.

9/1/2015 57 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide Transportation is the key to all aspects of emergency response, starting with pre‐event activities, during the response and to facilitate recovery. Without roads, no response is possible. While law enforcement and fire personnel may be the personnel who delivery disaster response services, they cannot reach the victims without the use of a safe and debris‐free road lane. Before an event has occurred transportation is key to the development and implementation of evacuation activities, especially those using the roads to move people, using cars, busses, ambulances and paratransit. The state transportation agency also collaborates with other modes to create an evacuation system, such as rail and air assets. During a response open roads are essential for moving public safety personnel to the scene of an event. Since the State Department of Transportation owns the roads they are responsible for the safety of the road to serve its users. Bridge, tunnel and road surface inspection and debris removal – and sometimes even expedient repairs‐ are required before public safety personnel can use the roads into a disaster area. This lesson was learned in the 1989 Loma Prieta, California Earthquake when a policeman died when his car went off a damaged bridge on Route 1 in Monterey County that had not been inspected yet. Open roads are essential for disaster recovery. Supplies and personnel needed for community restoration have to travel by road. Repair and replacement equipment may need overweight permits and routing. Restoration of the supply chain demands a functioning state highway system, including its arterial connectors. The state department of transportation’s role is clear: as Caltrans says, “We’re here to get you there,” and that is never more important than in an emergency!

9/1/2015 58 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide The response to a disaster event involves collaboration among all emergency response providers. Each agency has its purpose in protecting the community and bringing it back to a functional state. Police, fire and emergency medical services personnel interact directly with members of the public at a time of stress, while transportation responders provide functioning roads to make that response possible. Several terms are used for the personnel who work to resolve a disaster, and it is important to understand the differences among the terms. “Public safety personnel” is a human resources management term that defines a specific level of benefits for people who are frequently in harm’s way, especially pension benefits. “Emergency response provider” is used in Homeland Security Act 2002 and Post‐Katrina Emergency Management Reform Act of 2006 to refer “to those who are first to respond to disasters or emergencies.” (Bricker et al., 2013) For example, in the immediate response to the World Trade Center on 9/11 police, fire and EMS personnel were obvious with their uniforms, but did you know that there were more transportation personnel at the World Trade Center site than any other profession? The engineers who shored up the plaza to hold the heavy equipment that made rescue possible, the welders who cut the girders and the heavy equipment operators were all from transit and transportation agencies. So clearly transportation personnel are “emergency response providers.” The role of Transportation is to provide the means for all emergency responders to access those in need and assist them in resolving their circumstances. You can argue that Transportation therefore is actually THE FIRST RESPONDER, because it makes all other response possible.

9/1/2015 59 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide The Incident Command System was developed by the California fire service as a result of a series of wildland fires in Southern California in the 1970s that required a multijurisdictional response. This led to the creation of the FIRESCOPE organization that oversees the development of ICS today. In 1980 ICS was adopted by the National Fire Academy as a best practice for managing multi‐agency, multi‐ jurisdiction fire and emergency events. ICS is now used by organizations at all levels of government and multiple professions, from small volunteer fire departments to the US Coast Guard, and it is mandated for the management of all hazardous materials accidents and incidents by the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). In 2001 the United States was attacked by terrorists who used airplanes as guided missiles, crashing into the World Trade Center in New York and the Pentagon near Washington, D.C. The Arlington, Virginia Fire Department used ICS to organize the response to the Pentagon, which is widely considered as a model disaster response, integrating local, state and federal assets for the rapid evacuation and care of the victims and mitigation of damage to the building. In Homeland Security Presidential Directive‐5 in 2003 President George W. Bush ordered the creation of a National Incident Management System, “institutionalizing the use of ICS across the entire response system.” The use of ICS is mandated for all agencies receiving federal disaster preparedness grants. This includes most State Transportation Agencies.

9/1/2015 60 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide NIMS is based on three basic elements: ICS, MACS and Mutual Aid. ICS uses a modular approach. As you will see in the next slide, there are five basic functions and three Command Staff functions, but one person can handle multiple tasks, or many people can handle one task, depending on the size and complexity of the event. A supervisor should have no fewer than 3 subordinates and no more than 7 to ensure manageable span of control. Units, groups and branches can be created or collapsed to maintain the desired span of control. Unity of command means that every person has only one supervisor. Common terminology ensures that appropriate resources are provided and the right person is contacted. The Incident Commander sets the objectives for each Incident Action Period – management by objective. Using Unified Command the leaders of various agencies with equal responsibility for the resolution of an event can work together to create a common Incident Action Plan. Second, response is based on multi‐agency coordination, where first responder agencies with overlapping jurisdictions collaborate to develop resource and information sharing systems to support field operations and prioritize incidents. Third, response is supported by Mutual Aid agreements through which different professions provide immediate assistance to jurisdictions whose resources have been overwhelmed by the emergency. These include not only fire and law enforcement but also engineering and heavy equipment. The Emergency Management Assistance Compact has been signed by all 50 states, agreeing to provide assistance across state boundaries when requested.

9/1/2015 61 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide There are five functions in the Incident Command System: Command, Operations, Planning/Intelligence, Logistics and Finance/Administration. The Incident Commander (IC) is in overall charge of the field level event, sets the goals and priorities for the Incident Action Plan (IAP), sets the length of the Incident Action Period, and appoints people to fill any other field level ICS position that is required to meet the needs of the event. Not all positions have to be filled for every event, but the IC keeps all positions for which no one else is appointed. The command staff supports the IC in three specific ways. The Public Information Officer (PIO) handles all media releases with the approval of the IC. Only the PIO speaks to the media and the public. The Safety Officer ensures that everyone operates safely at all times, using the right equipment. The Liaison Officer manages representatives for other organizations that assist in the response, such as utility representatives or American Red Cross representatives. The General Staff is made up of the leaders of the four other functions. The Operations Section Chief is in overall charge of the tactical response, based on the goals set by the IC. The Planning/Intelligence Section Chief manages check‐in, accountability for personnel, situation status, creates reports and organizes demobilization. The Logistics Section Chief provides the supplies and services needed to support Operations. The Finance/Administration Section tracks time, costs, and receipt of purchases to support Operations.

9/1/2015 62 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide The Incident Command System can support a variety of transportation activities, not only catastrophic events. ICS allows the Incident Commander to activate the elements of ICS that will best support the resolution of the problem in the community, and to activate only the number of people needed to manage the event to resolution. ICS can be used for emergencies like wildland fires, but it can also be used for smaller problems like roadway hazards. In Tennessee a truckload of potatoes was spilled on the roadway. Rather than wait for a team of convicts to be brought to the scene to clear the hazard by hand, the Department of Transportation quickly put ICS in place, set the objective of opening the road within 30 minutes, and used a grader to push the potatoes into a ditch where they could be retrieved later without tying up traffic. This same ICS system allowed the New Jersey State Patrol and New Jersey DOT to quickly create contraflow on the Atlantic City Expressway to evacuate seashore residents ahead of Hurricane Sandy. ICS can be used for parades, sporting events and other planned activities that will negatively impact traffic flow. Using ICS for planned events helps to familiarize transportation personnel with many aspects of ICS, such as using the terminology, and seeing how the functions collaborate.

9/1/2015 63 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide Sometimes State Transportation Agencies have planned events that are run using ICS, where the Incident Commander is a State Transportation Agency senior staff member, and all ICS positions are filled by State Transportation Agency staff. For example, SWARM 1&2 were scheduled maintenance projects in California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) District 7. Over 300 Caltrans personnel spent six hours on November 4, 2012 from 6 am through noon and again in February 2013 from 6 am through noon completing needed maintenance and repairs on closed portions of 101 and I‐110 in Los Angeles. Caltrans was the Incident Commander, organizing its work, coordinating with the California Highway Patrol to close sections of the freeways, and with local police departments to close the on ramps from city streets and manage traffic impacts on city streets.

9/1/2015 64 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide Emergency response can be organized in many ways, but the Incident Command System is designed specifically to ensure that all personnel are safe, that there is continuous accountability for personnel in the field, and that the organization gets the maximum reimbursement for its disaster‐related costs. The Safety Officer and the Planning/Intelligence Section Chief ensure the overall safety of the personnel at the event. The Safety Officer is concerned with the proper use of equipment and the use of appropriate personal protective equipment by responders. The Planning/Intelligence Section Chief maintains information on the location of every person at the event for personnel accountability. He accomplishes this through the check‐in/check‐out function, and through demobilization at the end of an event. All the sections cooperate with the Finance/Administration Section Chief to ensure that supplies are ordered properly, expenses are accounted for and receipts are safeguarded. They also collaborate to document the work of the response to ensure that expenses are tied to appropriate damage, rescues and other field work.

9/1/2015 65 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide ICS has three key purposes: safety, personnel accountability and cost reimbursement. Safety begins with the Check‐in process. When a person is assigned to an event he begins by checking in with the Planning/Intelligence (P/I) Section Chief at the Command Post. The P/I Chief creates a “T” card for each person or work unit with their personal information, duty assignment and communication contact information. It is through check‐in that responders get counted for food, sleeping space and other personal support at the incident. Most important, it is through Check‐in that the Incident Commander knows where his subordinates are at all times to ensure that they receive all safety messages and information about an evolving situation. After checking in with the P/I Chief at the Incident Command Post the person may be assigned to a division or group, and he will check‐in again with that supervisor and join the field activity. Sometimes after check‐in a person or work unit will be assigned to staging. Staging is a location where people and equipment wait for an assignment. The person signs in with the staging manager, and waits in the staging area until he is assigned to a field group or division, often at the next shift change. Sometimes the person may be assigned to a base or camp to rest or eat while awaiting an assignment. Once the person is assigned to a field task he checks out with the staging manager, or base or camp manager, and checks in with the field supervisor. In this way there is continuous tracking of each person working at the event. This ensures that he is counted for meals and beds, but more importantly, he is notified if the situation changes and he needs to move to a safer location. As the person completes one assignment and moves to the next he checks out with the supervisor he is leaving , and checks in with the P/I Chief to get his new assignment. In this way he keeps his location and supervisor information up to date.

9/1/2015 66 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide Checkout occurs at each change of field assignment. A person may check out when an assignment is completed, or when his shift has ended. He checks out with his field supervisor and then with the Planning/Intelligence Chief at the Command Post. If he will be going to a base or camp to eat or sleep he will tell the P/I chief his destination, and check‐in there. The next day he would check out of the base or camp and check in with the P/I chief at the Command Post again. Check out at the end of the assignment period completes the safety oversight of that person. When the person is leaving the event he checks out with the field supervisor and then with the P/I Chief, giving the location of his destination and a contact phone number there. He is then sent to demobilization. The demobilization process ensures that all equipment is returned, all reports and subordinate evaluations are completed, and all vehicles are safe for the trip home. Vehicles may have been exposed to fire, heat, freezing or other austere conditions that could damage their equipment. A mechanic checks over the mechanical systems, brakes and tires to ensure that the vehicle is roadworthy before the person leaves the ICS assignment.

9/1/2015 67 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide Personnel accountability is the second purpose of the ICS. Through the P/I chief the IC knows at all times where his personnel are located, what field work groups and divisions have been organized, and how many people are in each. This allows the IC and the Operations Chief to ensure that the span of control for supervisors is kept to no more than 7 people per supervisor. Groups and divisions are created when the span of control becomes too large. ICS also provides for the care of personnel in the field. Through the check‐in procedure the IC knows how many people are working at the site. This number is used for ordering meals, portable restrooms and shelters. In an extended event it is used to order sleeping facilities, showers and laundry facilities, as well. ICS also provides for the medical and mental health needs of the responders. The number of personnel working determines the level of medical oversight that will be at the scene, and the kinds of emergency medical equipment that will be readily available. During especially stressful events the work period may end with a critical incident stress defusing among those who shared the experiences on that shift. During the demobilization process each person is asked whether he suffered any medical or mental health injuries, and participants may be assigned to Workers Compensation for treatment, including critical incident stress counseling. ICS provides for a family contact when possible. A liaison will generally be available to receive messages from families and relay messages to families when personnel are deployed over several days in areas with little communications capability. Often the amateur radio community supports the family communication system. These radio operators may be organized through RACES or ARES.

9/1/2015 68 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide Reimbursement is another activity of ICS. When an emergency occurs it draws on resources that had been budgeted for another purpose. If reimbursement does not occur the original project cannot be accomplished. Reimbursement comes from the Federal Highway Administration if there is damage to the state highway system roadways. MAP‐21 legislation changed the way reimbursement is managed by FHWA during some disasters. For example, debris removal reimbursement rules have changed. In an event with a Presidential Disaster Declaration, the cost of debris removal must be reimbursed through FEMA, which has very strict accounting requirements for documentation of not only the expenses but also the work itself and the eligibility of that work for reimbursement. FEMA generally only reimburses for 75% of the cost of non‐emergency work. The Finance Section at the field level must collaborate with the Operations Section to ensure that photos and other evidence are collected to support the requests for reimbursement for disaster‐ related work. The GIS function on the camera should be activated, and the date and time stamp must be set to the correct time so that the photos provide usable evidence for reimbursement. The job you save may be your own! If the money is spent, and there is no reimbursement available, the organization’s budget has to be rebalanced, meaning that some activities will have to be curtailed for that fiscal year, and jobs might even be lost.

9/1/2015 69 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide Most day to day events can be handled as they have been in the past, but with the change in reimbursement requirements for FHWA and FEMA it may become necessary to start using Incident Command to document an incident to ensure that FHWA and FEMA requirements for documentation are met to protect the maintenance budget. Then there are times when an event overwhelms not only DOT’s day to day capability, but other responders as well, requiring coordination between the different organizations to resolve the problems. Under these circumstances, the Incident Command System is critical in bringing those organizations together, developing a common operating picture, identifying resources needed, and how they will be used, and in particular keeping responders safe and capturing data – through documentation – to ensure reimbursement.

9/1/2015 70 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide Transportation personnel may be sent to an emergency with little or no notice. Therefore it is wise to develop support materials to ensure your safety and capability to do your job. While personnel support may be provided in long term events, localized emergencies may leave you on your own as you accomplish emergency repairs or road closures. Everyone should have a work car kit in the vehicle he uses during the work day, and a professional drive‐away kit assembled or ready to be assembled. Two fliers have been provided to guide you as you make the kits. Let’s turn to the fliers in your book at page 106. The most important element is drinking water. You can get along without food for a few days, but drinking water is essential for your health. We recommend that you keep one gallon of water per person in your work vehicle. Information on safe storage of water is included in one of the family fliers to be discussed later. The second critical element is medication. Law forbids employers from dispensing any medications, even over the counter items. Keep a 30 day supply of essential prescription drugs, allergy medications, headache remedies or other over the counter medications that you use on a regular basis in your backpack, briefcase or purse. Never store medications in the car as the heat variance will damage most medications. Sturdy shoes or steel‐toed boots and a blanket are other essential items. Review the suggested items in the kit and make a kit that is appropriate to your location, activities and personal medical requirements. Consult your physician regarding appropriate food if you have medical issues. The professional drive away kit flier includes suggestions for augmenting your work vehicle kit, such as weather‐related gear, communications and computer equipment, and plans and maps. Use the flier as a guide in developing your own kits. Put the work vehicle kit in your trunk and have it there every day. Know where your professional drive away kit items are kept and be ready to assemble them quickly following the checklist and based on weather conditions and assignments.

9/1/2015 71 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide Transportation workers may have to go to emergency events with little or no notice and be gone for several days. These events may impact the whole community, including where workers’ families live. The workers and their families need to plan in advance for community emergencies to ensure that the families are prepared and safe while transportation workers are absent fulfilling their disaster service worker roles. Let’s look at the fliers starting at page 106. A collection of home and personal preparedness fliers has been provided in your training materials to support getting your family prepared. You start by reviewing the Disaster Service Worker brochure with you family to ensure that they know that you may be gone during an emergency. Make a family emergency plan and prepare for the most likely emergencies in your community – floods, wildfires, hurricanes or earthquakes, for example. Create the vital records list for your family. You cannot be admitted to an American Red Cross shelter without proof of residence, and other documents are essential for filing insurance claims and getting assistance from FEMA. Work with your family to create kits for the home and each family car. Make lists of vital information and check on plans at your child’s school or day care, or your parents’ assisted living facility. Be sure to keep your emergency contact cards current so that an authorized person can help your child or loved one if you are unavailable. Then join with the Community Emergency Response Team in your neighborhood to share skills and assistance with those who live nearby. If you are called to work you have peace of mind knowing that your family is part of a network of disaster support while you are gone. If you do not have a neighborhood CERT team, contact your local Office of Emergency Services or Fire Department to start one.

9/1/2015 72 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide Read the slide.

9/1/2015 73 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide

9/1/2015 74 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide Transportation has at least five distinct roles at a disaster. The State Transportation Agency may be integrated into an existing ICS structure in the Operations Section, it may be a technical specialist in the Planning/Intelligence Section, it may be part of a unified command, it may assume command once other problems are resolved, or it may be the Incident Commander in a rapid onset emergency on the State Highway System, or in a planned event like a maintenance project.

9/1/2015 75 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide Sometimes events occur that require the assistance of State Transportation Agency personnel and the use of State DOT equipment. The appropriate personnel from the district are dispatched from their normal duties to assist the requesting agency with road inspections, road damage assessment, expedient repairs or related work. Upon arrival the State DOT workers formally join the existing ICS system by checking‐in at the Incident Command Post with the Planning/Intelligence section chief. They receive an assignment within Incident Command System’s existing Incident Action Plan, and are either assigned to the Liaison Officer or to a division supervisor, in which case they travel to the site to meet the supervisor. They get a briefing on the existing situation status, location of their work site, and a safety briefing, at a minimum. In a multi‐day incident the State DOT workers should receive food, lodging, and other support through the ICS.

9/1/2015 76 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide In some events State Transportation Agency engineers, surveyors, geologists and other specialists may be called on for their unique expertise that is needed by another entity. Most often this would be a city or county road department or a special district. The appropriate State DOT management would select an employee with the proper qualifications and certifications to fulfill the request. That employee would go to the Incident Command Post as a single resource, check‐in, and serve as a technical specialist under the Planning/Intelligence Section. Some Technical Specialists might be assigned to Operations Section groups or to other ICS organizational units. The guidance for Technical Specialists is on page 9‐9 of the FEMA FOG, 2010.

9/1/2015 77 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide In a complex event involving the state highway system State Transportation Agency personnel may become part of a unified command. According to the ICS Field Operations Guide, “Unified command is a team effort that allows all agencies with jurisdictional responsibility for an incident, either geographical or functional, to participate in the management of the incident…developing and implementing a common set of incident objectives…without losing …agency authority, responsibility or accountability.” (FEMA FOG, 2010, p. 6‐2) A multi‐vehicle accident is a good example of when unified command would be needed. Law enforcement would generally be the Incident Commander. State DOT might need to open the roads so that fire and EMS personnel could access injured drivers. Damaged vehicles might need to be moved off the road to open an access lane while expedient repairs were made to bridges, guard rails or other damaged portions of the road infrastructure. Fire and EMS would be responsible for life saving rescue and care, while highway patrol and other law enforcement agencies were creating traffic control and access control. Many multi‐vehicle accidents include loads of hazardous materials in transit that are spilled. The state’s environmental protection agency would have to collaborate with the State DOT staff and oversee the clean‐up. If hazardous materials got into storm drains or waterways from runoff the Fish and Wildlife agency might oversee environmental clean‐up in wildlife areas. The Coast Guard would participate in cleanup plans for navigable waterways.

9/1/2015 78 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide State Transportation Agency personnel may assume command from an existing Incident Commander whose work is completed. For example, when there was a mudslide near the San Francisco Golden Gate Bridge during heavy rains in December 2014 the California Highway Patrol (CHP) was initial Incident Commander, as the traffic issues had to be resolved to protect life. As soon as the detours had been established and the road segment was closed the command passed to Caltrans to investigate the geotechnical issues causing the mud slide, remediate the road blockage and undertake expedient repairs to get the road opened before the morning commute. When the cleaning and repairs were completed the Incident was returned to CHP to manage the road reopening and traffic management. In other circumstances the command might be turned over to a different agency, such as to state EPA if environmental clean‐up were needed. Each time command is passed all the records for the event have to be turned over to the new Incident Commander for use in After Action Review and the eventual reimbursement and close‐out process. This includes all the ICS forms completed to date, all the Incident Action Plans and all receipts. If there is Logistics support of personnel needed, the Incident Commanders have to determine how those services will continue to be provided. Requests for additional agency involvement can be made if the new Incident Commander lacks the capacity to staff all the needed ICS positions. For example, State DOT could request Planning/Intelligence support from Fire through Dispatch.

9/1/2015 79 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide When a disaster occurs on a road, or involving a road, the State Transportation Agency personnel may be the first on the scene, or the first personnel able to manage the event. On a major state highway there may be regular highway patrol beats that bring an officer to the scene quickly, but in more remote parts of the state it may be hours before highway patrol personnel are available. If DOT workers were already in the area they may be the first emergency responders to arrive at the scene who can organize the response, communicate situation status information to their headquarters and start to organize emergency response. This may be as simple as determining what resources are needed to resolve the event, or as complex as providing first aid to injured motorists.

9/1/2015 80 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide The first person on the scene who is capable of starting a response becomes the Incident Commander (IC). This could be a State Transportation Agency road crew supervisor or worker. He would identify someone to assume the role of the Safety Officer to round up transportation personnel and identify hazards. The IC would then notify dispatch that he is establishing Incident Command. Next he would identify someone to be the Planning/Intelligence Section Chief to begin documentation. A third person is identified as the Logistics Section Chief, and inventories available supplies. This approach divides the work and allows multiple sources of information for assessing the situation. The situation assessment helps to identify additional ICS positions that are needed, and contributes to the development of an Incident Action Plan. The Planning/Intelligence Section Chief would complete the ICS 201, the event size up, to document conditions at the scene. It helps to organize the information gathered in the initial phases of an event. The ICS 214 is an activity log that is used to document the work of all components of the incident command. It is used to provide a chronological list of actions taken and decisions made. The ICS 208 is the Safety Message. This is issued when the Incident Command is started to remind all personnel about safe actions for the initially responding units. The IC may also request assistance from other State Transportation Agency field personnel, or from other first responders. He would remain the Incident Commander until someone with more appropriate qualifications and certifications assumes command.

9/1/2015 81 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide The Incident Command System may be a seldom used skill for most State Transportation Agency supervisors. Therefore it is important to have guides readily available for when the supervisor becomes part of an Incident Command system in any role. The first tool is the Incident Command System Field Operations Guide, known as ICS ‐420‐1 or the FOG. This provides detailed checklists for every position in the ICS emergency response organization. There is a FOG in the Supervisor’s Folders that were distributed today. However, State Transportation Agency personnel would only assume some of those roles in an emergency. So you have also been given some laminated cards on a ring. These cards provide a focused set of checklists for the positions that State Transportation Agency personnel are likely to fill, or that would be filled during a DOT‐led activation. The Incident Commander can distribute the cards to the person he assigns to each ICS position, which will help him keep track of which positions have been assigned and which he is still filling himself. It allows the staff members to quickly focus on just the assignment each has for that Incident Action Period. Cards can be easily swapped when roles change, at shift change, or when Incident Command is passed to another entity. When the State Transportation Agency is no longer in charge the supervisor can retrieve his cards during check‐out as a means of completing personnel accountability.

9/1/2015 82 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide A Supervisor’s board is a handy tool for use in passing or assuming command. The individual ICS forms can be completed and posted in the self‐adhesive, clear plastic packing pockets attached to a cardboard backing. The zip lock tops protect the forms from rain and wind, but allow them to be easily updated or changed at each new Incident Action Period. Arriving personnel can easily obtain needed information from the ICS 201, including the map of the event, the objectives, the organization’s staffing for the current Incident Action Period, and the safety message. The cardboard can be cut to fit as many ICS forms as the Incident Commander wants to display for incoming personnel. The Incident Commander and Planning/Intelligence Section Chief can make a board quickly with stored supplies. The board can be attached to the side of a truck with duct tape or magnetic clips. When the time comes for shift change or change of organizational command the outgoing IC can take a photo of the forms for his records and pass the board to the incoming IC. The board costs only a few dollars to make, so passing it along to another agency is not a financial consideration.

9/1/2015 83 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide In the first timeline, which shows incident management without the use of ICS, you see a progression of notification of event, in which case the dispatchers need to determine what the nature of the event is, in order to dispatch the proper discipline (fire, law, medical). That unit then has to arrive on scene, size up the situation, and it may have to ask for even more resources. In the second time line, by using ICS, the overall response time is reduced by having the first responder on the scene establish ICS, then employ additional transportation agency crew members who are present to begin filling the ICS roles and starting those tasks, allowing multiple lines of activity to be engaged in at the same time. Notification, resource assessment, ingress and egress routes for responding units, personnel accountability and safety oversight all occur simultaneously through the Command function, Safety Officer, Planning/Intelligence function, and Operations function. An overall picture and size up of the event can then occur, based on the efforts of multiple staff working in concert to create an accurate report for dispatch and higher levels of the organization’s management.

9/1/2015 84 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide In summary, all State Transportation Agencies must use NIMS in response to any event involving multiple agencies, multiple professions or multiple jurisdictions. This means that ICS must be used in the field. There are many ways to manage an emergency, but ICS has three specific purposes: to ensure the safety of all personnel at the event, to ensure accountability for all personnel during their time at an event, and to ensure that all possible reimbursement for work done by the State Transportation Agency personnel is received. The State Transportation Agency is the owner of the State Highway System within the state. As such it is obligated to ensure that the roads are safe for all the traveling public, including emergency response by public safety personnel. The State Transportation Agency may have a variety of roles within an ICS depending on the phase of the event and the tasks assigned to DOT personnel.

9/1/2015 85 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Instructor's Guide Are there any questions about ICS and its applications, or anything else you learned in today’s class? Please complete the evaluation sheet and leave it on the front table as you depart. Your comments are very important to us, as they allow us to continuously improve the course delivery.

Next: Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet »
Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff Get This Book
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TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Web-Only Document 215: Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff provides training materials and guidance for transportation field personnel to help their organizations operate safely in an emergency or traffic management event. This course is intended to review the basic ICS structures and terminologies aimed to ensure safety, personnel accountability, and support for the agency’s financial reimbursement efforts.

This product includes lesson plans, guidance on classroom set-up, complete slide shows with scripts or instructor prompts, instructions for creating materials, and some information about training for adults. Specifically, the materials include:

1. A video presentation with voice-over of the MSPowerPoint slides for the ICS for Field-Level Transportation Supervisors and Staff training course (Format: ISO of an MP4 file)

2. An Instructor Guide and Student Course Evaluation (Customizable; Format: ZIP file of Microsoft Word, Microsoft PowerPoint, PDF files).

3. An Instructor Guide and Student Evaluation (Customizable; Format: ZIP file of Microsoft Word and Microsoft PowerPoint files)

4. Discussion-Based Training Scenarios, which contain an instructor's guide and student evaluation (Customizable; Format: ZIP file of Microsoft Word files)

5. ICS Quick Start Cards (Customizable; Format: Microsoft Word)

6. A Supervisor’s Folder, which includes a materials list and construction information (Format: Microsoft Word).

The course material provided in this project assumes that instructors have completed classes on delivering training to adults, have certificates in at least ICS 100, 200 and 300, and have some experience with ICS, at the field level or in an Emergency Operations Center (EOC). It is also assumed that instructors may have had experience working with a transportation agency in emergency planning or training, or as a field supervisor, and to have also completed ICS 400 and E/L449 ICS “Incident Command System Curricula TTT” courses.

Disclaimer: This software is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

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