National Academies Press: OpenBook

Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff (2016)

Chapter: Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet

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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 Module 1a and 1b Student Manual with Evaluation Sheet." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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86 CHAPTER 5: MODULE 1A AND 1B STUDENT MANUAL WITH EVALUATION SHEET

87 Sponsoring Agency Logo NCHRP 20-59 (30) ICS for Field-Level Transportation Supervisors and Staff Course of Instruction Student Manual

9/4/15 88 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Student Manual ICS and Transportation’s Role In Emergency Management • Today’s learning goals: • Review the role of transportation in emergencies • Review ICS roles and terminology • Review the use of ICS for safety, accountability and reimbursement • Consider the application of ICS to transportation situations 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 2 NCHRP 20-59 (30) Incident Command System (ICS) for Field-Level Transportation Supervisors and Staff Sponsored by State Department of Transportation Instructors John Smith, M.P.A., CEM, MEP (example) Sue Williams, M.A., ACE (example)

9/4/15 89 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Student Manual Road Crew, courtesy of City of San Jose • Public Safety – Police, Fire, EMS • Assist human victims • HR term related to benefits • “Emergency Response Provider” includes State DOT personnel • Homeland Security Act 2002 • Post-Katrina Emergency Management Reform Act 2006 • “Critical transportation” = Core Capability under National Preparedness Goal ICS Personnel Are “Emergency Response Providers” 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 4 ICS for Transportation • Key to all emergency response • Pre-event evacuation • Response • Post-event recovery • Coordination with other emergency responders • No roads, no response • Transportation owns the road, so responsible for the safety of the road to serve the public • Safety Inspection- bridges, tunnels and road surface • Debris removal for access • Expedient repairs 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 3

9/4/15 90 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Student Manual National Incident Management System (NIMS) Incorporates… Incident Command System (ICS) Modular, flexible, span of control, unity of command Common Terminology Management by Objective Unified Command Multi-agency coordination system (MACS) Mutual Aid Agreements 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 6 Incident Command System (ICS) 1970s California FIRESCOPE 1980 National Fire Academy 2004 NIMS Homeland Security Presidential Directive-5 (HSPD-5), 2003 Pentagon Attacked 9/11/2001 Oakland Hills Firestorm, 1991 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 5

9/4/15 91 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Student Manual ICS for Transportation • ICS is flexible and scalable • Use what you need, staff to meet span of control requirements • ICS can be used for emergencies, disasters and catastrophes • Spilled potatoes • Hurricane Sandy • ICS can be used for planned events • Parades • Sporting events • Planned maintenance 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 8 Incident Commander Safety Officer Public Information Officer Liaison Officer Planning/ Intel Chief Logistics Chief Operations Chief Finance/ Admin Chief ICS for Transportation • Five Functions of the Incident Command System in the Field 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 7

9/4/15 92 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Student Manual NIMS/ICS: Perform Reliably and Effectively • Goal of NIMS/ICS: Reliable and effective response to an event, emphasizing safety of DOT staff • Achieved through • SAFETY • Check-in • Check-out • Demobilization • Personnel Accountability • Reimbursement 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 10 Practical Application of ICS in Transportation 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 9

9/4/15 93 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Student Manual ICS FOR TRANSPORTATION • Goals • Safety • Check out • Demobilization 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 12 ICS for Transportation • Goals • Safety • Check-in Examples of “T” Cards 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 11

9/4/15 94 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Student Manual ICS FOR TRANSPORTATION • Reimbursement • The job you save may be your own • MAP-21 changes, some reimbursement now FEMA 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 14 ICS FOR TRANSPORTATION • Personnel accountability includes care • Food, shelter • Medical and mental health • Family contacts 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 13

9/4/15 95 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Student Manual ICS FOR TRANSPORTATION • Transportation staff may be sent to an emergency at any time • Getting ready in advance will make for a more efficient response • Work vehicle kit • Professional Drive Away Kit 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 16 Can be handled internally. May require documentation Needs multiple organizations and a variety of resources to solve. Will require use of ICS

9/4/15 96 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Student Manual ICS FOR TRANSPORTATION SUMMARY • Transportation is the key to all emergency response • ICS is the method required by the federal government to organize the response to a multi‐jurisdictional, multi‐profession emergency event • The five functions of ICS are used in the field by all emergency response personnel • Safety, accountability and care for personnel are accomplished through check‐in, check‐ out and demobilization • Put a work vehicle kit in your trunk and develop a professional drive‐away kit for quick assembly. • Getting your home ready for an emergency and your family into CERT will give you peace of mind when you are deployed in a disaster to help the community. 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 18 ICS for Transportation • Family preparedness • Family plan • Vital records • Family supplies at home • Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) • Family car kit 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 17

9/4/15 97 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Student Manual • Join an existing ICS in Operations • Wildland Fire • Join an existing ICS in Planning/Intelligence • Subject matter expert Five ICS Roles Possible for Transportation Personnel • Unified Command • Hurricane Sandy, New Jersey • Assume command • Mudslide • Incident Commander • Event occurs right in front of you • Preplanned complex maintenance 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 20 15 Minute BREAK 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 19

9/4/15 98 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Student Manual Incident Commander Safety Officer PIO Liaison Officer Planning/ Intel Chief Logistics Chief Operations Chief Finance/ Admin Chief Transportation as a Technical Specialist • State DOT may be tasked as technical specialist to another organization • Technical specialists are part of the Planning/Intelligence Section in ICS. 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 22 Incident Commander Safety Officer PIO Liaison Officer Planning/ Intel Chief Logistics Chief Operations Chief Finance/ Admin Chief Join Existing Incident Command System • State Transportation Agency’s help would be requested by another agency, like a Fire Department • DOT personnel would be dispatched from their normal duties to assist the requesting agency with road and bridge inspections, road damage assessment, expedient repairs or similar work. • DOT workers formally join the existing ICS through the check‐in procedure, and get assigned to the Liaison Officer or to a supervisor to perform tasks related to DOT’s capabilities. 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 21

9/4/15 99 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Student Manual Safety Officer PIO Liaison Officer Planning/ Intel Chief Logistics Chief Operations Chief Finance/ Admin Chief Golden Gate Bridge Mud Slide, December 2014 Incident Commander Assume Command • Report to existing Incident Command event • Assume command from another agency whose work is done • Continue the Incident Command until all road‐related issues are successfully completed • Close out the Incident or transfer the command to another agency with responsibility for the remaining issues • For example, to EPA for environmental remediation 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 24 Incident Commander, Unified Command: Fire Law Tramnsportation Safety Officer PIO Liaison Officer Planning/ Intel Chief Logistics Chief Operations Chief Finance/ Admin Chief • “Unified command is a team effort that allows all agencies with jurisdictional responsibility for an incident, either geographical or functional, to participate in the management of the incident…developing and implementing a common set of incident objectives…without losing …agency authority, responsibility or accountability.” FEMA FOG, 2010, p. 6-2. • Type of incident example – major accident • Law Enforcement is the Incident Commander • Law Enforcement provides traffic control and scene access control • May require that road damage assessment and expedient repairs begin immediately to permit access to victims, or that road management change, such as contraflow. • May include Fire and EMS for life saving services • May include EPA for hazmat clean up • May include Fish and Wildlife for environmental clean‐ up; Coast Guard for navigable waterways Unified Command 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 23

9/4/15 100 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Student Manual Incident Commander • Establish command • Assess situation • Appoint ICS positions • Field ICS requires a Safety Officer • Document using ICS 201 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 26 Incident Commander Starting Incident Command  Event on an isolated road  DOT is first on the scene, there doing maintenance  Supervisor starts ICS Safety Officer PIO Liaison Officer 9 4 15 Planning/ Intel Chief ICS for Transportation Field Personnel Logistics Chief Operations Finance/ Chief Admin Chief 25

9/4/15 101 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Student Manual Organizing the Paperwork in a Field Environment • Supervisor’s Folder • ICS forms 201, 208, 214 • Communications plan with district level contact information 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 28 ICS: Seldom Used Skill Guides for the Incident Commander Incident Command System Field Operations Guide, ICS‐420‐1 Supervisors’ Checklist Cards 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 27

9/4/15 102 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Student Manual 15 Timelines ICS can help reduce the overall response time by laying the groundwork for subsequent responders 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 29 Current Practice Transportation using ICS Summary • All State Transportation Agency response to a multi‐agency event must use NIMS, which is ICS in the field • Personnel safety, accountability for personnel and reimbursement are the three purposes of ICS • The State Transportation Agency is the owner of the SHS • The State Transportation Agency may have a variety of roles in the response to planned event, an emergency or a catastrophic disaster 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 30

9/4/15 103 NCHRP 20‐59 (30) Student Manual Questions? 9 4 15 ICS for Transportation Field Personnel 31

104 Professional Preparedness Materials 1. Emergency Kit for Work Vehicle 2. Professional Drive‐Away Kit

WATER. This is your most important item. You will need water to drink, for first aid, and to take medicine. In your kit, have at least one gallon of water per person, based on who usually rides in your work vehicle . You could purchase a box of foil packets or cans of water at a camping store, or one liter bottles in a 20 bottle flat. PRESCRIPTION MEDICATIONS. This is the second most important item. If you take medications on which your health depends you must carry a three-day supply at all times. This would include heart, blood pressure and diabetic medications. If you regularly take other prescription drugs for allergies or other health concerns, it is also wise to carry these. STORE IN YOUR BACKPACK, BRIEFCASE OR PURSE – NOT IN YOUR CAR. Keep this supply fresh by rotating it every week. Also include any non-prescription medications you often use: nose drops, antihistamine, allergy remedies, diarrhea medication, headache remedies or indigestion medications. In times of stress such as an emergency health problems can become worse. Having proper medications and keeping to the prescribed schedule is very important. FOOD. Food is important for psychological reasons and to keep your blood sugar level up to avoid dizzy or shaky feelings. F o r t h i s r e a s o n yo u s h o u l d s e l e c t f o o d f o r yo u r k i t t h a t yo u l i k e a n d t h a t yo u a r e u s e d t o e a t i n g . I n a d d i t i o n , p eople with diabetes, heart disease, or other health problems should consult their physicians for advice about the foods for their kits. The healthy general public should select foods like crackers, peanut butter, snack packs of fruit or pudding, granola bars, p ro t e in ba r s , dried fruit, wa te r -p ack ed tu na o r ch i cken and single serving cans of juice. Plan on four light meals per day. Avoid high sugar foods like candy and soft drinks as they make you very thirsty. Avoid alcoholic beverages. Avoid MREs, as they are very high in fat and sodium and can make you very sick if you are not accustomed to a high fat diet. Avoid “emergency food bars” as they are designed for shipwrecked people who are sedentary in a boat and may get seasick. They are designed to keep blood sugar up in a few bites. They are not designed to satisfy hunger in a person who is moving around and working. They are also very high in sugar and fat. Avoid camping foods and other dried food, as they require a lot of water consumption to metabolize. They are also high in calories. EMERGENCY KIT FOR THE WORK VEHICLE 105

LIGHT SOURCE. A chemical light stick provides long shelf life and a sparkless source of light. A flashlight with a special long-life battery or a long-burning candle may be used after you have checked to be sure that there is no leaking gas or petroleum in the area. Do not rely on a regular flashlight as ordinary batteries lose their power quickly in the heat of a car. You might consider an electric light with an attachment to your car cigarette lighter, available at camping stores. COMMUNICATION. Your cell phone can be charged from your car battery. Use only the text function in a disaster to conserve battery life and bandwidth. Even when the voice function will not work it is likely that a text will go through. Put your s p o u s e o r parents’ numbers in the ICE function, and keep other key numbers in the directory. RADIO. Your car radio is your source for emergency broadcast information. Get a list of all-news stations for the area where you live, work, and areas you drive to or through. Keep this list in your glove compartment and in your emergency kit. A hand cranked emergency radio is also useful and eliminates the need for batteries. These often come with flashlights that run on the same power source. Some also have a solar power panel. EMERGENCY BLANKET. Mylar emergency blankets are available at camping-goods stores. They can be used as a blanket or a heat shield against the sun. They fold into a small package. A thermal blanket may be added when storage space permits. FIRST AID SUPPLIES. Include 4x4 gauze, cloth that can be torn into strips to hold a bandage in place, Kerlex, anti-bacterial ointment (such as Neosporin, Bacitracin), burn cream, rolls of gauze, large gauze pads, rolls of first aid tape, scissors, a large cloth square for a sling or tourniquet, safety pins, needles and heavy thread, matches, eye wash, a chemical ice pack and a first aid book. Rotate the medical supplies every six months. PERSONAL CARE AND HYGIENE ITEMS. Alcohol-based hand sanitizer, baby wipes, small plastic bottle of pine oil or other disinfectant, six large heavy-duty garbage bags with ties for sanitation and waste disposal, box of tissues, roll of toilet paper, plastic bucket to use as a toilet after lining it with a plastic garbage bag.. (Your smaller kit items can be stored in your bucket inside a sealed trash bag). Tooth brush/tooth paste, mouth wash, deodorant, face cloth, folding cup, and other person items should be based on personal needs. ADDITIONAL ITEMS TO CONSIDER. Sturdy shoes (especially if your work shoes are not good for walking), sweater or jacket, hat/sun visor, feminine hygiene supplies, whistle (to attract attention and call for help), rope or string, pencil and paper, safety pins, $100 in small bills to buy essential supplies in case the ATM does not work, a roll of quarters for a pay phone. Add appropriate climate-related items like sun screen or gloves. DON’T LET YOUR GAS TANK FALL BELOW HALF FULL! The radio and heater in your car may save your life, but you can’t run the car’s accessories long without the gas to start the engine and re-charge the battery. If you travel in isolated areas, on the freeway, or far from home, an adequate gasoline supply is crucial. Fill up often. After a disaster the gas pumps may not work for several days while electrical power is restored, and once the pumps work, the supplies will quickly be depleted through panic buying. NEVER CARRY CANS OF GAS IN YOUR TRUNK! A can of gas is a bomb! 106

PROFESSIONAL DRIVE-AWAY KIT FOR FIELD ICS STAFF Note: this is in ADDITION TO your personal car kit, which should be brought along. CRITICAL PERSONAL PREPAREDNESS:  adequate supply of drinking water for 5 days (1 gallon/person/day recommended)  adequate supply of prescription and OTC medications for at least 10 days, or the duration of the assignment, whichever is greater  if you have a medical condition that limits food choices, check with the COOP/COG staff for a list of food stored at the COOP site and supplement as needed. Use guidance from the Car Kit flier. Personal protective equipment:  hard hat, vest, steel-toed shoes/boots  gloves, eye protection, ear protection Personal weather gear:  rain suit, rain boots, umbrella  hooded sweatshirt  cold weather outerwear (hat, gloves, scarf, ear muffs, ski mask, jacket, pants)  sun hat, sun glasses  sun screen, hand cream, face cream, lip balm Personal supplies:  eye glasses – prescription (reading, computer, sun glasses, other), spare pair, repair kit  hearing aid and batteries  baby wipes, hand sanitizer  deodorant, tooth brush, toothpaste  t-shirts, spare underwear and socks  cot, pillow, sleeping bag, blanket  towel, wash cloth, soap  trash bags, toilet paper, small shovel  other personal support items for austere circumstances Communications equipment: Note- cell phones should allow use while recharging  GETS card  WPS card  Cell phone o car charger o wall charger o solar charger o spare battery  Solar/crank radio  Radio o car charger o wall charger o solar charger 107

o spare battery  Satellite phone o car charger o wall charger o solar charger o spare battery Note: getting equipment that uses a USB connection for charging can limit the number of chargers needed. Computer equipment:  Laptop o car charger o wall charger o solar charger o spare batteries  Thumb drive  Digital camera o car charger o wall charger o solar charger o spare batteries  Small portable printer o cables to connect to various computers o paper o spare cartridges  Tablet computer, PDA, SMART Phone or other small computer o car charger o wall charger o solar charger o spare batteries  Note: getting equipment that uses a USB connection for charging can limit the number of chargers needed.  AC extension cord with at least 3 plug-in slots  Appropriate software for each computer o Internet connection o Office Suite (MSWord, MSExcel, others) o GPS o GIS o CAD  Program files to support the field work o Maps o As-builts o Plans o Directories – department phone list, relevant contracts contacts o Forms, regulations, other essential documents 108

Paper copies of relevant plans and maps  ICS forms  Supervisor’s ICS Cards  Supervisor’s ICS folder  Area maps  District Emergency Operations Plan  District Fan-out chart  Maps of critical facilities in the district  District employee phone lists  District employee emergency contact lists Office Supplies  Pens, pencils, sharpener, eraser  Scissors, string, twine  Portfolio or clipboard and spare paper pads  Laptop desk or small folding table and chair  Paper clips, binder clips, magnetic clips  Scotch tape, electrical tape, package tape, duct tape  Stapler and staples 109

Family Preparedness Materials 1. California DSW information folder 2. Confidential Household Data for your Disaster Kit 3. FEMA : Family Basic Disaster Supplies 4. Car kit 5. Vital Records Emergency Information 6. Low Cost/ No Cost Emergency Preparedness 7. School/ Child Day Care Emergency Plans; Adult Day Care Emergency Plans 8. CERT Flier: Palm Bay Emergency Preparedness (example) 110

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Confidential Household Data for Your Disaster Kit Address:___________________________________Phone:_______________ Adult Name:________________________________ Work Phone:__________ Employer:__________________________________ Work Hours:__________ Adult Name:________________________________ Work Phone:__________ Employer:__________________________________ Work Hours:__________ Other adults in the household: Any with disabilities?: Children Birth Year School Persons authorized to pick-up children from school (Info on emergency release card) Name_________________________________ Phone__________________ Name_________________________________ Phone__________________ Name_________________________________ Phone__________________ Name_________________________________ Phone__________________ Pets in Household: Type:_______________________ Medical Problems_______________________________ Type:_______________________ Medical Problems_______________________________ Type:_______________________ Medical Problems_______________________________ Household Cell Phones, E-mail addresses, Ham Radio Call Signs, etc. _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ What language is spoken at home: _______________________________________________ What languages can you act as a translator for: _____________________________________________________________________________ Important Medical Conditions in Family, including allergies and special medications: _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ 113

Neighbors that have your house key: Address______________________________________________________________________ Out of Area Contact: Relationship: City: Phone: _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ Family meeting place: Address:_____________________________________________________________________ Phone:_______________________________________________________________________ Make a rough sketch of your home showing the locations of gas & water valves and electric switches. Show entry and exits, location of pool or hot tub. Include location of your emergency and first aid supplies. Hot Water Heater Strapped Top & Bottom Yes________ No________ Need Help_________ What neighborhood teams are your family members part of? ____________________________________________________ 114

FEMA: Family Basic Disaster Supplies Keep the items that you would most likely need during an evacuation in an easy-to-carry container. Possible containers include a large, covered trash container; a camping backpack; or a duffle bag. There are six basics you should stock in your home: Water: http://www.fema.gov/plan/prepare/water.shtm How Much Water do I Need? You should have at least a three-day supply of water and you should store at least one gallon of water per person per day. A normally active person needs at least one-half gallon of water daily just for drinking. Additionally, in determining adequate quantities, take the following into account:  Individual needs vary depending on age, physical condition, activity, diet, and climate.  Children, nursing mothers, and ill people need more water.  Very hot temperatures can double the amount of water needed.  A medical emergency might require additional water. How Should I Store Water? To prepare the safest and most reliable emergency supply of water it is recommended that you purchase commercially bottled water. Keep bottled water in its original container and do not open it until you need to use it. Observe the expiration or “use by” date. If You are Preparing Your Own Containers of Water It is recommended that you purchase food-grade water storage containers from surplus or camping supply stores to use for water storage. Before filling with water, thoroughly clean the containers with dishwashing soap and water. Rinse them completely so that there is no residual soap. Follow the directions below on filling the container with water. If you choose to use your own storage containers, choose two-liter plastic soft drink bottles NOTplastic jugs or cardboard containers that have had milk or fruit juice in them. Milk protein and fruit sugars cannot be adequately removed from these containers and provide an environment for bacterial growth when water is stored in them. Cardboard 115

containers also leak easily and are not designed for long-term storage of liquids. Also, do not use glass containers, because they can break and are heavy. If storing water in plastic soda bottles, follow these steps: Thoroughly clean the bottles with dishwashing soap and water Rinse completely so that there is no residual soap. Sanitize the bottles by adding a solution of 1 teaspoon of non- scented, liquid household chlorine bleach to a quart of water. Swish the sanitizing solution around in the bottle so that it touches all surfaces. After sanitizing the bottle, thoroughly rinse out the sanitizing solution with clean water. Filling Water Containers Fill the bottle to the top with regular tap water. If the tap water has been commercially treated from a water utility with chlorine, you do not need to add anything else to the water to keep it clean. If the water you are using comes from a well or water source that is not treated with chlorine, add two drops of non-scented, liquid household chlorine bleach to the water. Tightly close the container using the original cap. Be careful not to contaminate the cap by touching the inside of it with your finger. Place a date on the outside of the container so that you know when you filled it. Store in a cool, dark place. Replace the water every six months if not using commercially bottled water. Food: http://www.fema.gov/plan/prepare/food.shtm Store at least a three day supply of non-perishable food. Select foods that require no refrigeration, preparation or cooking, and little or no water. If you must heat food, pack a can of Sterno. Select food items that are compact and lightweight. Avoid foods that will make you thirsty. Choose salt-free crackers, whole grain cereals, and canned foods with high liquid content. *Include a selection of the following foods in your Disaster Supplies Kit: Note: Be sure to include a manual can opener.  Ready-to-eat canned meats, fruits and vegetables  Canned juices, milk, and soup (if powdered, store extra water)  Staples--sugar, salt, pepper  High energy foods--peanut butter, jelly, crackers, granola bars, trail mix  Vitamins  Foods for infants, elderly persons, or persons with special dietary needs  Comfort/stress foods--cookies, hard candy, sweetened cereals, lollipops, instant coffee, tea bags First aid supplies: http://www.fema.gov/plan/prepare/firstaid.shtm 116

Assemble a first aid kit for your home and one for each car. A first aid kit should include:  Sterile adhesive bandages in assorted sizes  2-inch sterile gauze pads (4-6)  4-inch sterile gauze pads (4-6)  Hypoallergenic adhesive tape  Triangular bandages (3)  2-inch sterile roller bandages (3 rolls)  3-inch sterile roller bandages (3 rolls)  Scissors  Tweezers  Needle  Moistened towelettes  Antiseptic  Thermometer  Tongue blades (2)  Tube of petroleum jelly or other lubricant  Assorted sizes of safety pins  Cleansing agent/soap  Latex gloves (2 pair) Sunscreen Non-prescription drugs  Aspirin or non-aspirin pain reliever  Anti-diarrhea medication  Antacid (for upset stomach)  Syrup of Ipecac (use to induce vomiting if advised by the Poison Control Center)  Laxative  Activated charcoal (use if advised by the Poison Control Center) Contact your local American Red Cross chapter to obtain a basic first aid manual. Clothing, bedding and sanitation supplies: http://www.fema.gov/plan/prepare/clothing.shtm Clothing and Bedding If you live in a cold climate, you must think about warmth. It is possible that you will not have heat. *Include at least one complete change of clothing and footwear per person.  Jacket or coat  Long pants 117

 Long sleeve shirt  Sturdy shoes or work boots  Hat, gloves and scarf  Rain gear  Thermal underwear  Blankets or sleeping bags  Sunglasses Sanitation  Toilet paper  Soap, liquid detergent  Feminine supplies  Personal hygiene items  Plastic garbage bags, ties (for personal sanitation uses)  Plastic bucket with tight lid  Disinfectant  Household chlorine bleach Tools: http://www.fema.gov/plan/prepare/tools.shtm  Mess kits, or paper cups, plates and plastic utensils  Emergency preparedness manual  Portable, battery-operated radio or television and extra batteries  Flashlight and extra batteries  Cash or traveler's checks, change  Nonelectric can opener, utility knife  Fire extinguisher: small canister, ABC type  Tube tent  Pliers  Tape  Compass  Matches in a waterproof container  Aluminum foil  Plastic storage containers  Signal flare  Paper, pencil  Needles, thread  Medicine dropper  Shut-off wrench, to turn off household gas and water  Whistle  Plastic sheeting  Map of the area (for locating shelters) 118

Special items: Remember family members with special needs, such as infants and elderly or disabled persons.  For Baby o Formula o Diapers o Bottles o Pacifiers o Powdered milk o Medications  For Adults o Heart and high blood pressure medication o Insulin o Prescription drugs o Denture needs o Contact lenses and supplies o Extra eye glasses o Hearing aid batteries  Entertainment--games and books. . 119

WATER. This is your most important item. You will need water to drink, for first aid, and to take medicine. In your kit, have at least one gallon of water per person, based on who usually rides in your car. You could purchase a box of foil packets or cans of water at a camping store, or one liter bottles in a 20 bottle flat. PRESCRIPTION MEDICATIONS. This is the second most important item. If you take medications on which your health depends you must carry a three-day supply at all times. This would include heart, blood pressure and diabetic medications. If you or your children regularly take other prescription drugs for allergies or other health concerns, it is also wise to carry these. KEEP MEDICATIONS IN YOUR PURSE OR BRIEFCASE, NOT IN THE CAR. Keep this supply fresh by rotating it every week. Also include any non-prescription medications you often use: nose drops, antihistamine, allergy remedies, diarrhea medication, headache remedies or indigestion medications. In times of stress such as an emergency health problems can become worse. Having proper medications and keeping to the prescribed schedule is very important. FOOD. Food is important for psychological reasons and to keep your blood sugar level up to avoid dizzy or shaky feelings. Children need familiar food are regular intervals. F o r t h i s r e a s o n yo u s h o u l d s e l e c t f o o d f o r yo u r k i t t h a t yo u l i k e a n d t h a t yo u a r e u s e d t o e a t i n g . In a d d i t i o n , p eople with diabetes, heart disease, or other health problems should consult their physicians for advice about the foods for their kits. The healthy general public should select foods like crackers, peanut butter, snack packs of fruit or pudding, granola bars, p ro t e in ba r s , dried fruit, wa te r -p acked tuna o r ch i cken and single serving cans of juice. Plan on four light meals per day. Avoid high sugar foods like candy and soft drinks as they make you very thirsty. Avoid alcoholic beverages. Avoid MREs, as they are very high in fat and sodium and can make you very sick if you are not accustomed to a high fat diet. Do not feed MREs to children. Avoid “emergency food bars” as they are designed for shipwrecked people who are sedentary in a boat and may get seasick. They are designed to keep blood sugar up in a few bites. They are not designed to satisfy hunger in a person who is moving around and working. They are also very high in sugar and fat. Do not feed emergency bars to children. Avoid camping foods and other dried food, as they require a lot of water consumption to metabolize. They are also high in calories. EMERGENCY KIT FOR THE FAMILY CAR 120

LIGHT SOURCE. A chemical light stick provides long shelf life and a sparkless source of light. A flashlight with a special long-life battery or a long-burning candle may be used after you have checked to be sure that there is no leaking gas or petroleum in the area. Do not rely on a regular flashlight as ordinary batteries lose their power quickly in the heat of a car. You might consider an electric light with an attachment to your car cigarette lighter, available at camping stores. COMMUNICATION. Your cell phone can be charged from your car battery. Use only the text function in a disaster to conserve battery life and bandwidth. Even when the voice function will not work it is likely that a text will go through. Put your s p o u s e o r parents’ numbers in the ICE function, and keep other key numbers in the directory. RADIO. Your car radio is your source for emergency broadcast information. Get a list of all-news stations for the area where you live, work, and areas you drive to or through. Keep this list in your glove compartment and in your emergency kit. A hand cranked emergency radio is also useful and eliminates the need for batteries. These often come with flashlights that run on the same power source. Some also have a solar power panel. EMERGENCY BLANKET. Mylar emergency blankets are available at camping-goods stores. They can be used as a blanket or a heat shield against the sun. They fold into a small package. A thermal blanket may be added when storage space permits. FIRST AID SUPPLIES. Include 4x4 gauze, cloth that can be torn into strips to hold a bandage in place, Kerlex, anti-bacterial ointment (such as Neosporin, Bacitracin), burn cream, rolls of gauze, large gauze pads, rolls of first aid tape, scissors, a large cloth square for a sling or tourniquet, safety pins, needles and heavy thread, matches, eye wash, a chemical ice pack and a first aid book. Rotate the medical supplies every six months. PERSONAL CARE AND HYGIENE ITEMS. Alcohol-based hand sanitizer, baby wipes, diapers, feminine hygiene supplies, small plastic bottle of pine oil or other disinfectant, six large heavy-duty garbage bags with ties for sanitation and waste disposal, box of tissues, roll of toilet paper, plastic bucket to use as a toilet after lining it with a plastic garbage bag.. (Your smaller kit items can be stored in your bucket inside a sealed trash bag). Tooth brush/tooth paste, mouth wash, deodorant, face cloth, folding cup, and other personal items should be based on personal needs. ADDITIONAL ITEMS TO CONSIDER. Sturdy shoes, sweater or jacket, hat/sun visor, whistle (to attract attention and call for help), rope or string, pencil, pencil sharpener and paper, safety pins, $100 in small bills to buy essential supplies in case the ATM does not work, a roll of quarters for a pay phone. Add appropriate climate-related items like sun screen or gloves; books or games for children and adults. DON’T LET YOUR GAS TANK FALL BELOW HALF FULL! The radio and heater in your car may save your life, but you can’t run the car’s accessories long without the gas to start the engine and re-charge the battery. If you travel in isolated areas, on the freeway, or far from home, an adequate gasoline supply is crucial. Fill up often. After a disaster the gas pumps may not work for several days while electrical power is restored, and once the pumps work, the supplies will quickly be depleted through panic buying. NEVER CARRY CANS OF GAS IN YOUR TRUNK! A can of gas is a bomb! 121

FIRES, FLOODS, FAULTS, TERRORISTS…DO YOU KNOW WHERE YOUR VITAL RECORDS EMERGENCY INFORMATION IS…? During a disaster, such as an earthquake or flood, you may need to evacuate your home rapidly. You will want to have some important legal documents with you and others in a safe place. Take steps now to ensure that you safeguard your legal documents and have appropriate access to them for disaster recovery! 1. Open a bank safe deposit box or buy a fireproof safe for essential, irreplaceable, original documents. These include:  Family birth certificates  Marriage certificates and divorce papers  Citizenship papers  Military records and discharge papers, copies of the face of military ID cards  Copies of insurance policies with agent contact information  A list of bank accounts with the bank address  A list of credit card numbers and addresses  Accountant’s copy of your income tax filings for 7 years  Securities, US Savings Bonds, certificates of deposit, and other financial instruments  Original Social Security Cards for all family members  Titles and deeds for property  Vehicle titles and a copy of the registration papers 2. Make a GoKit Document Cache to keep in your family emergency kit. Organize these records in a 1” ring binder with page protectors or in a waterproof container. You can make a waterproof container with a 14” piece of 3” PVC pipe and two end caps. Use adhesive to attach one end cap permanently and use a threaded cap for the other end. Fill the book or tube with the following documents/copies and update it each spring and fall.  Copies of birth certificates and marriage/divorce papers  Emergency contact information for all family members: work address and phone, school address and phone, day care/after school care address and phone  Out of area contact person’s name, address and phone number  Copies of citizenship papers/green cards  Original passports for all family members  Military papers to prove Veterans Benefits eligibility, copies of the face of military ID cards  Copies of medical information for each family member: physicians names and numbers, prescription drug names and dosages, pharmacy name and number  Copies of insurance policies with 24 hour contact information for every policy  Copies of the tax bill, mortgage papers or property deed to prove homeownership; copy of lease to prove legal right to alternate shelter  Copies of 2 utility bills less than 1 year old to prove residency (owners and renters)  Copies of the credit card list and emergency numbers to report lost cards  Copies of all family drivers licenses and auto registrations  Copies of all Social Security Cards  One pad of checks and one credit card for an account that you seldom use. Use for emergency expenses: food, alternate lodging, replacement clothing  $100 in small bills in case cash registers and credit card machines do not work  $10 in quarters for the pay phone  A copy of the wills for each family member. Make sure that an out of area family member has another copy in a safe place, and that your legal adviser has a copy.  Copies of funeral arrangements in place or last wishes for adults. DON’T LEAVE YOUR FAMILY’S FINANCIAL SECURITY TO CHANCE…BE PREPARED! 122

Low Cost/No Cost Emergency Preparedness 1. Get a family out-of-state phone contact and make a wallet card for each family member. 2. Ensure that school emergency contact cards are regularly updated, and that each child has at least 2 people listed to pick him/her up if parents are unavailable. 3. Select two family reunification points for use if the home is inaccessible. Select one place in the neighborhood, such as a friend’s home, food store, or other location well known to all family members. Select another location not in your immediate neighborhood but easily accessible by all family members, such as your place of worship, a movie theater, or a regional mall. 4. Locate your gas meter and learn how to use the gas shut-off valve and when to shut off your gas. 5. Store heavy objects on low shelves or on closet floors, not on high shelves. Heavy pots, pans, and storage boxes may fall during earthquakes and injure family members. 6. Remove any heavy objects from overhead shelves in bedrooms. When people are asleep, they cannot protect themselves from falling objects. 7. Water is the most important element. Each person needs one (1) gallon for drinking and food preparation each day. Additional water is needed for sanitation, clean up, and for pets. A dog will need one (1) gallon a day and a cat will need at least a pint. Storing water is easy. Wash and rinse clean 2-liter soda bottles or clear plastic juice bottles. Fill them with tap water, then add four (4) drops of liquid chlorine bleach (Clorox, the plain unscented type.) Do not use the frosted type of plastic jugs that we buy milk and water in for storage purposes. These are for short term use and will deteriorate too soon for storage use. Keep some coffee filters available to be able to filter any cloudy or murky water you obtain during an emergency. Then treat it with sixteen (16) drops of chlorine bleach. Mix well and let stand for at least thirty (30) minutes before using. A little Tang or Kool-Aid can be added at the time of drinking to avoid the slight bleach taste. 123

(OVER) 8. Make a GoKit Document Cache: - Copies of the tax bill, mortgage papers, or property deed to prove homeownership; copy of lease to prove legal right to alternate shelter. - Copies of 2 utility bills less than 1 year old to prove residency (owners and renters.) - Copies of the credit card list and emergency numbers to report lost cards - Copies of all family members’ driver’s licenses and auto registrations - Copies of all Social Security Cards - A copy of the wills for each family member. Make sure that an out of area family member has another copy in a safe place, and that your legal adviser has a copy. - Copies of funeral arrangements in place or last wishes for adults. 9. Make a Car Kit: Have some simple things in your car. Think about yourself and family members. - Water, some snack food, any required prescription medication, and any special needs for your children. - Hat, jacket, blanket, or shawl. You may need to keep warm. - Writing paper, several pencils, a flashlight. Keep the batteries out of the flashlight until you need it. This prevents corrosion of the flashlight. - Shoes you can walk some distance in. Jogging shoes too worn for running are a good choice. Ladies should avoid high heels, open toes, and sandals. - Simple personal hygiene and other items for your comfort. Water, Food, and Medication should be changed weekly. Put a fresh supply into the kit and use what you take out. This way you do not have to buy extra supplies and nothing will spoil. Flashlight batteries should be replaced and used every few months. Shoes and extra clothes need not be new. Those that are out of style, may need a little sew-up, or have a stain will work just fine in an emergency. Start small. Then build as you can. Begin, the rest is easy. 124

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You're On Your Own! An Introduction to the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Did you know …? ™ There is a very good chance that your neighborhood will be on its own during the early stages following a catastrophic disaster. ™ After a catastrophic disaster, citizens will volunteer to help. Without proper training these people can expose themselves to potential injury and even death! ™ Experience has shown that basic training in disaster survival and rescue skills improves the ability of citizens to survive until responders or other assistance arrives City of Palm Bay Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Program The City of Palm Bay Office of Emergency Preparedness (OEP) has become a part of a national network of CERT communities. OEP has developed a program that is designed to help neighborhoods prepare for and respond after catastrophic disasters such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and other major emergencies. Individuals completing CERT training may be affiliated with one or more of the following teams: • Neighborhood CERT: Ten or more neighbors serving immediate residential neighborhood. • Business or Government CERT: Co-workers serving places of business and surrounding areas, or county, municipal, or state agency employees • School CERT: Faculty and staff serving a particular school and the surrounding areas. • Faith-Based CERT: Teams based at a house of worship serving the immediate neighborhood, or travel into areas that need assistance. • Youth CERT: Organized service- oriented groups, such as Civil Air Patrol, Fire or Police Explorers, or school-based clubs. 16 years and older. Individuals not affiliated with a team may still be trained and serve the Palm Bay community. Once trained, a CERT will be able to provide the following services to their neighborhood: ™ Increase their neighborhood’s disaster readiness ™ Perform triage and provide medical services to the injured ™ Perform light search and rescue operations ™ Extinguish small fires and teach fire safety. ™ Assess damage after a disaster ™ Organize procurement of supplies CERT Course Content The basic course will include those components necessary to get the team started and become capable of performing basic CERT functions. Each member must complete 32 hours of classes in the following areas to become certified. Classes are scheduled to accommodate the needs of each team and are available at convenient times. Teams will learn: Disaster Preparedness: Instructs team members how to prepare themselves and their neighborhoods for the various hazards that may occur. Team Organization and Disaster Psychology: Addresses organization and management principles necessary for a CERT to operate successfully. Covers critical incident stress for victims as well as workers. Medical Operations: Team members will learn how to conduct triage, establish medical treatment areas, and provide basic first aid for victims. Damage Assessment: Team members will learn how to rapidly assess damage employing a standardized format used throughout the city. Disaster Simulation: A small-scale disaster simulation is also a part of the basic program. Fire Suppression: Team members will learn how to use extinguishers and other equipment to suppress small fires. Light Search and Rescue: Team members will learn light search and rescue planning, techniques, and rescuer safety. 127

Frequently Asked Questions What is a CERT Member? A CERT member is a person who is trained to prepare for and respond after a disaster in their neighborhood. A group of ten or more members of a neighborhood, apartment complex, business, or similar residential area comprise a team. Persons not affiliated with a team may serve as individuals. Who may join a CERT? CERT is for anyone who is interested in helping his or her neighborhood prepare for a disaster and provide assistance afterward. Team training is preferred however persons may be trained even if they are not affiliated with a team. Where can I get more information about the CERT program ? Contact the City of Palm Bay Office of Emergency Preparedness at: (321) 952- 3400 Ext. 4504 or E-mail to: schulm@palmbayflorida.org The CERT Information Line: (321) 952-3400 Ext. 4504 - This information line will make available training schedules and other information relevant to the CERT program CERT WEBSITE RESOURCES: City of Palm Bay Office of Emergency Preparedness Program information and emergency preparedness tips schulm@palmbayflorida.org Federal Emergency Management Agency: http://www.fema.gov/emi/cert Information about the National CERT program and links to other CERT sites Continuing Education: Refresher classes are held several times a year and are open to all teams based on availability and need. Some of the other available continuing education courses: • Terrorism Awareness • Communications (Amateur radio operations, hand-held) • CPR courses are available. Contact the Palm Bay Fire Department at 321-409-6300 • Critical Incident Stress Management • Large-scale disaster simulations are held once- a -year where all teams are invited to participate. *CPR is NOT considered a component of CERT training. CITY OF PALM BAY OFFICE OF EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS Palm Bay Fire Department 128

EOC Training Materials Reference Materials Glossary of Terms About MTI (example sponsor info.) Instructor Bios (examples) 129

ICS Glossary of Terms and Acronym List GLOSSARY Command Field level tactical direction of an emergency; responsible for the directing, ordering, and/or controlling of resources at the field response level. Community Emergency Response Team An organization of neighborhood-based volunteers trained to respond to neighborhood needs in the immediate aftermath of an emergency; training supported by FEMA nationwide Emergency Operations Center A location from which emergency response is managed Emergency Responder Any employee of a public agency that responds to disasters Finance/Administration Section Responsible for all administrative and financial considerations surrounding an incident. Field Operations Guide A checklist-based guidebook to using each position in the Incident Command System First Responder An employee of a public agency who goes to the scene of an emergency to assist with its resolution Incident Action Plan An oral or written plan containing general objectives reflecting the overall strategy for managing an incident, goals, identification of operational resources and assignments. Incident Command Post The field location where the primary functions are performed. The ICP may be co-located with the incident base or other incident facilities. Incident Command System A tactical, hierarchical, flexible system for responding to emergencies at the field level Incident Commander The individual responsible for all incident activities, including the development of strategies and tactics and the ordering and the release of resources. The IC has overall authority and responsibility for conducting incident operations and is responsible for the management of all incident operations at the incident site. 130

Joint Operations Policy Statements An official signed document that outlines the agreement between Caltrans and CHP regarding operating the State Highway System, including Incident Management. Liaison Officer A member of the Command Staff responsible for coordinating with representatives from cooperating and assisting agencies or organizations. Logistics Section Responsible for providing facilities, services and material support for an incident. Multi-Agency Coordination System Agencies and disciplines at any level of the ICS organization working together in a coordinated effort to facilitate decisions for overall emergency response activities, including the sharing of critical resources and the prioritization of incidents. Mutual Aid A mechanism to quickly obtain emergency assistance in the form of personnel, equipment, materials and other associated services. The primary objective is to facilitate rapid, short-term deployment of emergency support prior to, during, and/or after an incident. National Incident Management System An integrated system to enable public, NGO and private sector partners to seamlessly prevent, protect against, respond to, recover from and mitigate the effects of incidents, regardless of cause, size, location, or complexity, in order to reduce the loss of life or property and harm to the environment. Operational Area An intermediate level of the state emergency organization, consisting of a county and all other political subdivisions within the geographical boundaries of the county. Operations Section Responsible for all tactical incident operations and implementation of the Incident Action Plan; may include subordinate branches, divisions, and/or groups. 131

Planning/Intelligence Section Responsible for the collection, evaluation and dissemination of operational information related to the incident and for the preparation and documentation of the IAP; maintains information on the current and forecasted situation and on the status of resources assigned to the incident. Public Information Officer A member of the Command Staff responsible for interfacing with the public and media and/or with other agencies with incident-related information requirements. Sandbox exercise A method of simulating actions and events using small vehicles and taped road markings on a table or floor Safety Officer A member of the Command Staff responsible for monitoring incident operations and advising the IC on all matters relating to operational safety, including the health and safety of emergency responder personnel. ACRONYMS CERT Community Emergency Response Team DOC Department Operations Center EOC Emergency Operations Center FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency FHWA Federal Highway Administration FOG Field Operations Guide, especially in ICS IAP Incident Action Plan ICP Incident Command Post ICS Incident Command System MACS Multi-Agency Coordination System MAP-21 Moving ahead for Progress in the 21st Century; federal highway funding bill NIMS National Incident Management System PIO Public Information Officer SOC State Operations Center 132

MINETA TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (MTI) The Mineta Transportation Institute (MTI) was established at San José State University by Congress as part of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. The Institute was reauthorized in 1998 and 2006, and it was selected through a competitive process in 2011. MTI receives oversight from an internationally respected Board of Trustees (see insert) whose members represent all major surface transportation modes. MTI was created to identify through research, to teach through graduate education and certification programs, and to disseminate publicly the best transportation practices in use throughout the world. This helps to ensure that our nation’s transportation systems remain competitive. MTI’s prestigious board and its affiliation with the College of Business, rather than with the School of Engineering, make it unique among the US University Transportation Centers. The Institute’s transportation policy work is centered on three primary responsibilities: Research: The Mineta Transportation Institute provides policy research to all levels of government and the private sector to foster the development of optimum surface transportation systems. Projects are selected through an extensive needs assessment process, and only research with a practical application is pursued. MTI is widely recognized for expertise in public transit, transportation security, transportation tax measures, high-speed rail, and land use. Security: MTI established its National Transportation Safety and Security Center (NTSSC) in 1996. Ten years later, US DHS Secretary Michael Chertoff designated MTI as a National Transportation Security Center of Excellence. Since its inception, MTI’s NTSSC has completed many detailed case studies, with additional studies in process, covering every major terrorist attack against a transportation target anywhere in the world since 1990. NTSSC also created a computerized chronology of every reported terrorist attack against a US transportation system since 1920. MTI conducted security needs assessments for international bridges and major tunnels, along with detailed SEMS/ NIMS emergency response plan reconciliations and tabletop exercises for Caltrans districts. MTI also has conducted several Norman Y. Mineta National Policy Summits on related security issues. These were co-sponsored by US DOT, DHS, AASHTO, APTA, Caltrans and others. Education: MTI, in partnership with the College of Business at San José State University, offers an accredited California State University Master of Science in Transportation Management and transportation-related graduate certificates. The curriculum was designed in consultation with the MTI Board of Trustees and is delivered at night via videoconference throughout California so working people may earn their graduate degrees. A periodic needs assessment assures that the course work remains relevant to transportation industry needs. More than 200 students have graduated from the program, many of whom credit their degrees for their career advancements. Technology Transfer: MTI uses several methods to distribute research findings. Research reports are posted to MTI’s website, which averages more than 380,000 hits and 100,000 downloads per month. Research associates are frequently interviewed for news stories, and many articles have been published about MTI research. The Institute sponsors symposia and forums to present research results and to discuss transportation issues with industry professionals. Research associates are encouraged to publish articles about their work and to present at conferences. MTI’s digital newsletter, World in Motion, covers innovation in the research and education programs. The Institute’s extensive collection of transportation-related publications is integrated into San José State University’s library. Contact Information: Mineta Transportation Institute 210 N. 4th Street, 4th Floor San Jose, CA 95112 Tel: 408.924-7560 Fax: 408.924-7565 E-mail: mineta-institute@sjsu.edu transweb.sjsu.edu Karen Philbrick, PhD Executive Director Directors and Staff Hon. Rod Diridon, Sr. Peter Haas, PhD Emeritus Director, Education Executive Director Brian Jenkins Donna Maurillo Director, Transportation Director, Communications Safety and Security Center and Technology Transfer Jill Carter Joseph Mercado Executive Administrative Research Support Manager Assistant Viviann Ferea Frances Cherman Education Assistant Web Administrator 133

INSTRUCTOR NAME John Smith, M.P.A., CEM, MEP is the …. [Continue with no more than one page of course- related education, training and experience. Be sure to include relevant FEMA certifications.] 134

State DOT District X ICS for Transportation Field Personnel Training Date Evaluation 5= Completely agree 1= Completely disagree Please circle your responses for 1, 3 and 5 Use the back side for extra space for any question, or for additional comments 1. The ICS seminar was useful for me in my State DOT role: 5 4 3 2 1 2. The most useful thing I learned at today’s ICS seminar was: 3. The sandbox exercise was useful for me in my State DOT role: 5 4 3 2 1 4. The most useful information in the sandbox exercise was: 5. Today’s ICS seminar and exercise provided adequate information for me to work effectively in an ICS event. 5 4 3 2 1 Important thing (s) that should be added for future training: What should be eliminated from future training? ___________________________________________________________________ 135

Next: Chapter 6 Briefing Training Topics Instructor MSPowerPoint Slides and Script »
Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff Get This Book
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TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Web-Only Document 215: Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff provides training materials and guidance for transportation field personnel to help their organizations operate safely in an emergency or traffic management event. This course is intended to review the basic ICS structures and terminologies aimed to ensure safety, personnel accountability, and support for the agency’s financial reimbursement efforts.

This product includes lesson plans, guidance on classroom set-up, complete slide shows with scripts or instructor prompts, instructions for creating materials, and some information about training for adults. Specifically, the materials include:

1. A video presentation with voice-over of the MSPowerPoint slides for the ICS for Field-Level Transportation Supervisors and Staff training course (Format: ISO of an MP4 file)

2. An Instructor Guide and Student Course Evaluation (Customizable; Format: ZIP file of Microsoft Word, Microsoft PowerPoint, PDF files).

3. An Instructor Guide and Student Evaluation (Customizable; Format: ZIP file of Microsoft Word and Microsoft PowerPoint files)

4. Discussion-Based Training Scenarios, which contain an instructor's guide and student evaluation (Customizable; Format: ZIP file of Microsoft Word files)

5. ICS Quick Start Cards (Customizable; Format: Microsoft Word)

6. A Supervisor’s Folder, which includes a materials list and construction information (Format: Microsoft Word).

The course material provided in this project assumes that instructors have completed classes on delivering training to adults, have certificates in at least ICS 100, 200 and 300, and have some experience with ICS, at the field level or in an Emergency Operations Center (EOC). It is also assumed that instructors may have had experience working with a transportation agency in emergency planning or training, or as a field supervisor, and to have also completed ICS 400 and E/L449 ICS “Incident Command System Curricula TTT” courses.

Disclaimer: This software is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

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