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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Promises and Perils of Digital Strategies in Achieving Health Equity: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23439.
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References

AHRQ (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality). 2013. National Healthcare Disparities Report 2012 No 13-0003: Washington, DC.

Bauermeister, J. A., E. S. Pingel, L. Jadwin-Cakmak, G. W. Harper, K. Horvath, G. Weiss, and P. Dittus. 2015a. Acceptability and preliminary efficacy of a tailored online HIV/STI testing intervention for young men who have sex with men. AIDS & Behavior 19(10):1860-1874.

Bauermeister, J. A., E. S. Pingel, L. Jadwin-Cakmak, S. Meanley, D. Alapati, M. Moore, M. Lowther, R. Wade, and G. W. Harper. 2015b. The use of mystery shopping for quality assurance evaluations of HIV/STI testing sites offering services to young gay and bisexual men. AIDS & Behavior 19(10):1919-1927.

Brach, C., D. Keller, L. M. Hernandez, C. Baur, R. Parker, B. Dreyer, P. Schyve, A. J. Lemerise, and D. Schillinger. 2012. Ten attributes of health literate health care organizations. Discussion paper. Washington, DC: Institute of Medicine.

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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Promises and Perils of Digital Strategies in Achieving Health Equity: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23439.
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Ginossar, T., and S. Nelson. 2010b. Reducing the health and digital divides: A model for using community-based participatory research approach to E-health interventions in low income Hispanic communities. Journal of Computer Mediated Communication 15(4):530-551.

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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Promises and Perils of Digital Strategies in Achieving Health Equity: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23439.
×
Page 47
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Promises and Perils of Digital Strategies in Achieving Health Equity: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23439.
×
Page 48
Next: Appendix A: Examples of eHealth Solutions Featured at the Workshop »
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Health care is in the midst of a dramatic transformation in the United States. Spurred by technological advances, economic imperatives, and governmental policies, information technologies are rapidly being applied to health care in an effort to improve access, enhance quality, and decrease costs. At the same time, the use of technologies by the consumers of health care is changing how people interact with the health care system and with health information.

These changes in health care have the potential both to exacerbate and to diminish the stark disparities in health and well-being that exist among population groups in the United States. If the benefits of technology flow disproportionately to those who already enjoy better coverage, use, and outcomes than disadvantaged groups, heath disparities could increase. But if technologies can be developed and implemented in such a way to improve access and enhance quality for the members of all groups, the ongoing transformation of health care could reduce the gaps among groups while improving health care for all.

To explore the potential for further insights into, and opportunities to address, disparities in underserved populations the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine held a workshop in October 2014. The workshop focused on (1) how communities are using digital health technologies to improve health outcomes for racial and ethnic minority populations, (2) how community engagement can improve access to high-quality health information for members of these groups, and (3) on models of successful technology-based strategies to reduce health disparities. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions at the workshop.

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