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Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow (2016)

Chapter: Appendix A: Committee Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
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A

Committee Biographies

Steven M. Teutsch, M.D., M.P.H. (Chair), is an independent consultant, adjunct professor at the Fielding School of Public Health at the University of California, Los Angeles, senior fellow at the Public Health Institute, and senior fellow at the Schaeffer Center of the University of Southern California. Until 2014 he was the chief science officer of Los Angeles County Public Health, where he continued his work on evidence-based public health and policy. He had been in the outcomes research and management program at Merck since October 1997, where he was responsible for scientific leadership in developing evidence-based clinical management programs, conducting outcomes research studies, and improving outcomes measurement to enhance quality of care. Prior to joining Merck he was the director of the Division of Prevention Research and Analytic Methods (DPRAM) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) where he was responsible for assessing the effectiveness, safety, and cost-effectiveness of disease and injury prevention strategies. DPRAM developed comparable methodology for studies of the effectiveness and economic impact of prevention programs, provided training in these methods, developed the CDC’s capacity for conducting necessary studies, and provided technical assistance for conducting economic and decision analysis. The division also evaluated the impact of interventions in urban areas, developed the Guide to Community Preventive Services, and provided support for the CDC’s analytic methods. He has served as a member of that task force and of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, which develops the Guide to Clinical Preventive Services, as well as on America’s Health Information Community Personalized Health Care Workgroup and the Evaluation of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×

Genomic Applications in Prevention and Practice Workgroup. He chaired the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Genetics Health and Society and has served on and has chaired Institute of Medicine panels, Medicare’s Evidence Development and Coverage Advisory Committee, and several subcommittees of the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Healthy People 2020. He received his undergraduate degree in biochemical sciences at Harvard University in 1970, an M.P.H. in epidemiology from the University of North Carolina School of Public Health in 1973, and his M.D. from Duke University School of Medicine in 1974.

Sandra S. Block, O.D., M.Ed., received her optometry degree in 1981 from the Illinois College of Optometry (ICO), after which she completed a pediatric residency at ICO. She has been on faculty at ICO since she completed her residency in 1982. In 1988, Dr. Block completed her master of education from National Louis University. She has been a consultant to the Special Olympics Lions Clubs International Opening Eyes program since 1995 and has been instrumental in developing the vision screening program that is now conducted globally. Dr. Block is an active member of the faculty, having served as the associate dean for academic affairs for 2 years and then as medical director of school-based vision clinics for the Illinois Eye Institute. Her interests lie in primary eye care for children of all ages, with a social focus on persons with disabilities, as well as the process of diagnosis and treatment of visually related learning problems. Dr. Block has been an active member of the American Academy of Optometry and American Optometric Association and sits on two committees for Prevent Blindness. She is a fellow and has achieved the level of diplomate in public health and environmental optometry at the American Academy of Optometry as well as a fellow in the College of Optometrists in Visual Development.

Anne L. Coleman, M.D., Ph.D., is the Fran and Ray Stark Professor of Ophthalmology in the Stein Eye Institute of the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), as well as a professor of epidemiology in the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. She is the director of the Stein Eye Institute Center for Community Outreach and Policy, UCLA Mobile Eye Clinic, and the vice-chair for academic affairs for the Department of Ophthalmology. Dr. Coleman received her medical degree from the Medical College of Virginia, completed her ophthalmology residency at the University of Illinois and her fellowship training in glaucoma at the Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University, and received a Ph.D. in epidemiology from UCLA. Dr. Coleman’s research is focused on the diagnosis, treatment, gene–environment interactions, and the societal impact of glaucoma, cataracts, and age-related macular degeneration, including the study of lifestyle limitations imposed on patients

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×

with these eye diseases. With contributions to numerous studies and peer-reviewed journal articles and other publications, Dr. Coleman continues to serve as an investigator for a number of ongoing studies and clinical trials. A recent illustration of her research at the interface of ophthalmology and public health published in JAMA and summarized in The New York Times identified lower rates of hip fractures among elderly patients who had elective surgery to treat their cataracts. Dr. Coleman has been actively involved in national outreach programs in ophthalmology, as the prior chair of a 14-member committee of eye health experts overseeing the National Eye Health Educational Program’s education programs and as the prior secretary of quality of care for the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO). She is the founding director of the AAO H. Dunbar Hoskins Center for Quality of Care and a member of the board of trustees of Helen Keller International and the St. John of Jerusalem Eye Hospital. She is a former at-large member of AAO’s board of trustees, president of Women in Ophthalmology, and recipient of the Academy’s Senior Achievement Award and Secretariat Award and is a consultant to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Ophthalmic Devices Panel and a member of the Council of the American Ophthalmological Society. Since 2003 she has served as the executive editor of glaucoma for the American Journal of Ophthalmology.

Kevin Frick, Ph.D., was trained as a health economist. He received his Ph.D. in economics and health services organization and policy at the University of Michigan. Dr. Frick has been with Johns Hopkins University since 1996, spending more than 16 years at the Bloomberg School of Public Health before becoming the vice dean for education at the Carey Business School in April 2013. His research focuses on cost-effectiveness analysis in fields ranging from ophthalmology to nursing to cancer care. He has published more than 200 peer-reviewed journal articles, of which he is principal author on more than 60.

Karen Glanz, Ph.D., M.P.H., is the George A. Weiss University Professor, a professor of epidemiology in the Perelman School of Medicine, a professor of nursing in the School of Nursing, and the director of the University of Pennsylvania Prevention Research Center. She is a senior fellow of the Leonard Davis Institute on Health Economics, the Center for Public Health Initiatives, and the Penn Institute for Urban Research, and a distinguished fellow of the Annenberg Public Policy Center. She was previously at Emory University (2004–2009), the University of Hawaii (1993–2004), and Temple University.

Dr. Glanz is a globally influential public health scholar whose research, funded for more than $40 million over the past 15 years, focuses on cancer prevention and control, theories of health behavior, obesity and the built

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×

environment, social and health policy, and new health communication technologies. Her research and publications about understanding, measuring, and improving healthy food environments, has been widely recognized and replicated. She is a member of the U.S. Task Force on Community Preventive Services and has a long history of leading community-based health research and programs, and she currently serves in several related roles at the University of Pennsylvania. Her scholarly contributions consist of more than 400 journal articles and book chapters. Dr. Glanz is senior editor of Health Behavior and Health Education: Theory, Research, and Practice, a widely used text now in its fifth edition.

Dr. Glanz has been recognized with local and national awards for her work, including being elected to membership in the National Academy of Medicine in 2013. She was additionally named a fellow of the Society for Behavioral Medicine and received the Elizabeth Fries Health Education Award.

Lori Grover, O.D., Ph.D., FAAO, is an internationally recognized clinician and educator, and a national policy and program consultant, in the care of people with chronic vision impairment. She has specialized in the comprehensive clinical care of individuals with vision loss for more than 20 years. Dr. Grover is senior vice president for health policy at King Devick Technologies, Inc., and the former dean of the Pennsylvania College of Optometry at Salus University. Dr. Grover previously served as an associate professor in the College of Health Solutions, Nursing and Health Innovation and as the inaugural director of the Center for Translational Health Science at Arizona State University. She served on the medical staff in the Department of Ophthalmology of the Wilmer Eye Institute at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine from 2000 to 2012 and earned her Ph.D. in health services research and policy from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in 2012, including certificates in health economics and health informatics. She directed a national clinical research network while at the Wilmer Lions Vision Research and Rehabilitation Center for her research that examined medical and eye care access for people with chronic visual impairment, and established new metrics and policy strategies for evaluating access to health care in populations with chronic conditions. Her research interests include evidence-based multidisciplinary team models for care, clinical decision support and cost-effectiveness assessment, driving and third-party policies related to chronic vision loss, and collaborative interprofessional and translational discovery. Dr. Grover is a past executive committee chair of the American Optometric Association (AOA) Vision Rehabilitation Section, serves on the AOA Evidence Based Optometry Committee, and is an author of three AOA evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. She is a past member of the board of directors of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×

the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry, and is chair-elect of the Professional Development and Education Committee of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. She is a past council member of the Vision Care Section of the American Public Health Association, a distinguished practitioner of the National Academies of Practice, and a diplomate in public health and environmental vision of the American Academy of Optometry.

Eve Higginbotham, M.D., is the vice dean for diversity and inclusion at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to joining Penn Medicine, Dr. Higginbotham held numerous academic leadership roles, including senior vice president and executive dean for Health Sciences at Howard University and dean and senior vice president for academic affairs at Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta. Most recently, she served as a visiting scholar for health equity at the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) in Washington, DC. Dr. Higginbotham has a wide range of research interests, from ocular pharmacology to health disparities and policy, and has extensive experience conducting clinical trials, specifically the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study, a multi-center, randomized trial that has significantly changed the care of ocular hypertensive patients. She earned her B.S. and M.S. in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her medical degree from Harvard Medical School. She completed a glaucoma fellowship at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston and is a board-certified ophthalmologist, with a subspecialty in glaucoma.

Peter D. Jacobson, J.D., M.P.H., is a professor of health law and policy and the director of the Center for Law, Ethics, and Health at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. He teaches courses on health law and public health policy. Before joining the University of Michigan, Mr. Jacobson was a senior behavioral scientist at the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica, California. In 1995 he received an investigator award in health policy research from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to examine the role of the courts in shaping health care policy. Mr. Jacobson’s books include Strangers in the Night: Law and Medicine in the Managed Care Era (Oxford University Press, 2002) and False Hope vs. Evidence-Based Medicine: The Story of a Failed Treatment for Breast Cancer (coauthored; Oxford University Press, 2007). His most recent book is Law and the Health System (co-authored; Foundation Press, 2014). Mr. Jacobson is the associate editor for health law and public health at the Journal of Health Politics, Policy, and Law, and he is a member of the board of directors of Public Health Foundation Enterprises, Inc. From 2010 to 2012, Mr. Jacobson served as the president of the Public Health Law Association. Mr.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×

Jacobson’s current research interests focus on the legal aspects of health care delivery and public health and public health systems. Mr. Jacobson’s recent research includes projects on health departments’ strategic adaptations to the new health care environment and public health entrepreneurship.

Edwin C. Marshall, O.D., M.S., M.P.H., is a professor emertius of optometry and public health at Indiana University (IU). Prior to this he was the vice president for diversity, equity and multicultural affairs at IU. Dr. Marshall has been the associate dean for academic affairs and student administration at the IU School of Optometry. Dr. Marshall was the founding chair of the Minority Health Advisory Committee of the Indiana State Department of Health and the vice chair of the Indiana Public Health Institute. He has served as the chair of the National Commission on Vision and Health, chair of the executive board and vice president (USA) of the American Public Health Association, and chair of The Nation’s Health editorial advisory committee. He is a past president of the National Optometric Association, the Indiana Optometric Association, and the Indiana Public Health Association. He also has served on the Indiana Commission on Excellence in Health Care’s Data and Quality Subcommittee, the Indiana Health Care Professional Development Commission, the Indiana Chronic Disease Advisory Council, the Benefits and Cost-Sharing Subcommittee of the Governor’s Advisory Panel on the Indiana Children’s Health Insurance Program, the board of directors of Bloomington Hospital and as a member of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization’s Roundtable on Health Literacy and Patient Safety. Dr. Marshall currently serves as a member of the National Eye Health Education Program Planning Committee of the National Eye Institute, the Diversity Advisory Board of Transitions Optical, and the Indiana Interagency State Council on Black and Minority Health.

Christopher Maylahn, M.P.H., is a Dr.P.H. candidate in health policy at the State University of New York School of Public Health and holds a master’s degree in public health from Yale University. His expertise is in the area of chronic disease epidemiology. He has more than 35 years of experience as a program research specialist with the New York State Department of Health, where he provides operational support for the New York state public health improvement plan. Mr. Maylahn has also worked with the Vermont Heart Association to develop a state hypertension control program and with the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists.

Mr. Maylahn’s areas of research include system structure and performance, interorganizational relationships and partnerships, factors associated with sustainable public health partnerships for community health

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×

needs assessments, and practice-based research through the New York Public Health Practice-Based Research Network. Other foci of his work include cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, asthma, obesity, age-related eye diseases, and surveillance of epilepsy.

Mr. Maylahn’s published work has addressed issues such as chronic disease public health services, factors affecting evidence-based decision making in local health departments, public health services and systems research, teaching evidence-based public health, older adult health surveillance, asthma, prostate cancer, and the behavioral risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

Joyal Mulheron, M.S., is the founder and executive director of EVERMORE, a nonprofit dedicated to supporting parents and families who have lost a child at any age and from any cause by building a holistic, evidence-based support system touching the lives of all of those who have been affected. She has worked in the nonprofit arena for nearly 15 years as an advisor to executive politicians and some of the nation’s most respected public policy institutions. Her successes include establishing new nonprofit organizations, partnering with the private sector, philanthropic fundraising, management and reporting, evaluating organizational and program success, optimizing team talent for impact, budgeting, and organizational strategy. While Ms. Mulheron has spent most of her career advising politicians, both Republican and Democrat, and translating basic science into public policy, she has most enjoyed leading major efforts and initiatives for the National Governors Association; the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; the American Cancer Society; and the Partnership for a Healthier America. In these efforts she has offered succinct policy recommendations and spearheaded teams in strategic planning, operations, and the implementation of deliverables under tight timeframes and budgets. She has managed a range of population health issues, including obesity, chronic disease, employee benefits, tobacco control, clinical trials, basic research, and genetics. Ms. Mulheron holds a master’s degree in biotechnology from Johns Hopkins University as well as bachelor’s degrees in both English and biochemistry from Virginia Tech. She has completed advanced studies in chemistry and World War II and minority literature.

Sharon Terry, M.A., is the president and chief executive officer of Genetic Alliance, a large network engaging individuals, families, and communities to transform health. She co-founded PXE International, a research advocacy organization for the genetic condition pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), in response to the diagnosis of PXE in her two children in 1994. Ms. Terry co-discovered the ABCC6 gene, patented it to ensure ethical stewardship in 2000, and assigned their rights to the foundation. She subsequently

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×

developed a diagnostic test and conducts clinical trials. She has a master’s degree in theology and is the author of 140 peer-reviewed papers, 30 of which are clinical PXE studies.

In her focus at the forefront of consumer participation in genetics research, services, and policy, she serves in a leadership role on many of the major international and national organizations, including the Accelerating Medicines Partnership; the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Health and Medicine Division’s Board on Health Sciences Policy; the National Academies Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health; the PubMed Central National Advisory Committee; the PhenX scientific advisory board; the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health; and the International Rare Disease Research Consortium executive committee. She is also the founding president of EspeRare Foundation of Geneva, Switzerland.

Ms. Terry is co-founder of the Genetic Alliance Registry and Biobank. She is on the editorial boards of several journals. She led the coalition that was instrumental in the passage of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act. She received an honorary doctorate from Iona College for her work in community engagement in 2006, the Research!America Distinguished Organization Advocacy Award in 2009, and the Clinical Research Forum and Foundation’s Annual Award for Leadership in Public Advocacy in 2011. She was named one of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s “30 Heroes for the Thirtieth Anniversary of the Orphan Drug Act” in 2013. She is a co-inventor of the Platform for Engaging Everyone Responsibly (PEER). PEER received substantial funding awards from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in 2014. Ms. Terry is an Ashoka Fellow.

Cheryl Ulmer, M.S., was a senior program officer and a study director for the Board on Health Care Services at the Institute of Medicine (IOM) from 2007 until her retirement in 2013. She most recently directed studies of the governance and financing of graduate medical education and of the development of an essential health benefit package under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. She also served as the director of the projects Future Directions for the National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Reports and Race, Ethnicity, and Language Data and as the co-director of the Resident Duty Hours: Sleep, Supervision, and Safety project. With respect to the topic of the current report, she has personal experience with vision impairment. Before joining the IOM, she worked as an independent consultant on a wide-ranging set of health care issues, but with a primary focus on the delivery and content of health care services, disparities in health status and quality of care across populations, and options for financing and insurance. Previous consulting work for the IOM included research, writing,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×

and editing services on the Pathways to Quality and the Consequences of Uninsurance series. Other illustrative independent consulting projects concluded in various reports, including Serving Patients with Limited English Proficiency: Results of a Community Health Center Survey; Giving Back and Moving Forward; Finding a Future Through Service in Community Health Corps; Changing Lives Through Service to Medically Underserved Communities; Assessing Primary Care Content: Four Conditions Common in Community Health Center Practice—Hypertension, Diabetes, Otitis, Asthma; The Role of Behavioral Factors in Achieving National Health Outcomes; and Schools as Health Access Points for Underserved Children and Adolescents: Survey of School-Based Programs. Ms. Ulmer has served as a senior associate with MDS Associates, a health care consulting firm, as well as in various positions within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, including in the Office of the Secretary, Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation/Health; the Health Services Administration; the Health Resources Administration; Medicaid Services; and the National Institutes of Health. She has a master’s degree from Georgetown University and a B.S. from Mary Washington College of the University of Virginia.

Rohit Varma, M.D., M.P.H., is the director of the University of Southern California (USC) Eye Institute, the chair of the Department of Ophthalmology, and a professor of ophthalmology and preventive medicine, and she holds the Grace and Emery Beardsley Chair in Ophthalmology. His primary research focuses on population studies of eye disease in children and aging populations. He is an expert on changes in the optic nerve in glaucoma and is also studying new imaging techniques for the early diagnosis of glaucomatous optic nerve damage. Dr. Varma is the principal investigator of multiple National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded studies, including the Los Angeles Latino Eye Study (LALES), Multi-Ethnic Pediatric Eye Diseases Study (MEPEDS), African-American Eye Disease Study (AFEDS), and the Chinese American Eye Study (CHES). He also served as a principal investigator for studies on blindness and vision impairment for the World Health Organization.

Dr. Varma has published more than 227 papers in peer-reviewed journals, edited 2 books, and presented his research at national and international academic meetings. He served on the editorial board of Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, and on the board of scientific counselors of the National Eye Institute, on the National Eye Health Education Program planning committee, and on the NIH anterior eye diseases study section.

Dr. Varma currently serves as the chair of the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s Public Health Committee and as a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Roundtable

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×

on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities. His honors and awards include the Research to Prevent Blindness Career Development and Sybil B. Harrington Scholar awards, the American Academy of Ophthalmology Senior Achievement Award, the Glaucoma Research Foundation President’s Award, and the Association for Research in Vision and Opthamology Fellow Silver Award. He received his M.D. from the University of Delhi, India, and an M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Heather E. Whitson, M.D., M.H.S., performs research focused on improving care and health outcomes for people with multiple chronic conditions. In particular, she has interest and expertise related to the link between changes in the eye and brain (e.g., Why do cognitive and brain changes occur in the context of late-life vision loss? Is Alzheimer’s disease associated with distinctive changes in the retina, and could such changes help diagnose Alzheimer’s early in its course?). Dr. Whitson is also interested in improving care delivery systems and intervention programs to better serve medically complex patients. She has developed a novel rehabilitation model for people with co-existing cognitive deficits, and she is part of an interdisciplinary team seeking to improve peri-operative outcomes for frail or at-risk seniors who must undergo surgery.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×
Page 474
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×
Page 479
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
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The ability to see deeply affects how human beings perceive and interpret the world around them. For most people, eyesight is part of everyday communication, social activities, educational and professional pursuits, the care of others, and the maintenance of personal health, independence, and mobility. Functioning eyes and vision system can reduce an adult’s risk of chronic health conditions, death, falls and injuries, social isolation, depression, and other psychological problems. In children, properly maintained eye and vision health contributes to a child’s social development, academic achievement, and better health across the lifespan.

The public generally recognizes its reliance on sight and fears its loss, but emphasis on eye and vision health, in general, has not been integrated into daily life to the same extent as other health promotion activities, such as teeth brushing; hand washing; physical and mental exercise; and various injury prevention behaviors. A larger population health approach is needed to engage a wide range of stakeholders in coordinated efforts that can sustain the scope of behavior change. The shaping of socioeconomic environments can eventually lead to new social norms that promote eye and vision health.

Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow proposes a new population-centered framework to guide action and coordination among various, and sometimes competing, stakeholders in pursuit of improved eye and vision health and health equity in the United States. Building on the momentum of previous public health efforts, this report also introduces a model for action that highlights different levels of prevention activities across a range of stakeholders and provides specific examples of how population health strategies can be translated into cohesive areas for action at federal, state, and local levels.

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