National Academies Press: OpenBook

Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow (2016)

Chapter: Appendix B: Committee Meeting Agendas

« Previous: Appendix A: Committee Biographies
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
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B

Committee Meeting Agendas

MEETING 1 AGENDA

Committee on Public Health Approaches to Reduce Vision Impairment and Promote Eye Health

Keck Center
500 Fifth Street, NW
Room 208
Washington, DC 20001

TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2015

10:30 – 10:45 a.m. Welcome and Introductions

Steven Teutsch, Committee Chair

10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Discussion of the Charge to the Committee

Perspectives from Study Sponsors:

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    • Jinan Saaddine
  • National Eye Institute
    • Mary Frances Cotch
  • American Academy of Ophthalmology
    • Michael Repka
  • American Academy of Optometry
    • Lois Schoenbrun
  • American Optometric Association
    • David Cockrell
  • Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology
    • Iris M. Rush
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
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  • National Alliance for Eye and Vision Research
    • James Jorkasky
  • Prevent Blindness and National Center for Children’s Vision and Eye Health
    • Jeff Todd and Kira Baldonado
  • Research to Prevent Blindness
    • Brian Hofland

Committee Discussion with Study Sponsors

12:15 – 1:00 p.m. LUNCH
1:00 – 2:15 p.m. Prevalence and Current Trends in Vision Impairment and Eye Health Across the Lifespan
  • Sheila West, Wilmer Eye Institute at the Johns Hopkins University
  • Susan Cotter, Southern California College of Optometry at Marshall B. Ketchum University
  • Xinzhi Zhang, National Institutes of Health
2:15 – 2:30 p.m. BREAK
2:30 – 4:00 p.m. Lessons from the Past and Implications for Public Health Initiatives
  • John Crews, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Paul Lee, University of Michigan
4:00 p.m. ADJOURN Open Session
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×

MEETING 2 AGENDA

Committee on Public Health Approaches to Reduce Vision Impairment and Promote Eye Health

Keck Center
500 Fifth Street, NW
Room 100
Washington, DC 20001

TUESDAY, JULY 28, 2015

8:10 – 8:20 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks

Steven Teutsch, Committee Chair

8:20 – 9:15 a.m. PANEL 1: DEVELOPING A PUBLIC HEALTH APPROACH: GOALS AND RESEARCH NEEDS

Moderator: Steven Teutsch, Committee Chair

  • Broad Overview of the Public Health Approach
    • Paul Jarris, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO)
  • Overview of Public Health Strategies to Improve Vision Health
    • Alfred Sommer, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
9:15 – 10:45 a.m. PANEL 2: MODELS OF VISION CARE AND EXPANDING ACCESS

Moderator: Anne Coleman, Committee Member

  • Lessons from International Models of Vision Care Delivery
    • Hugh Taylor, University of Melbourne
  • Integrated Models of Care in Vision
    • Paul Sternberg, Vanderbilt University
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×
    • Andrea Thau, State University of New York (SUNY) College of Optometry
  • Telemedicine and Bringing Primary Care Physicians into the Fold
    • Jorge Cuadros, University of California, Berkeley
10:45 – 11:00 a.m. BREAK
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. PANEL 3: REVIEWING VISION CARE GUIDELINES: CURRENT EVIDENCE AND RESEARCH GAPS

Moderator: Karen Glanz, Committee Member

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Guide to Community Preventive Services
    • Randy Elder, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Review of Evidence-Based Guidelines for Eye Examinations and Treatment of Major Eye Diseases
    • Paul Sternberg, Vanderbilt University
    • Susan Primo, Emory University
  • Guidelines and the E-Gap Project
    • Kay Dickersin, Johns Hopkins University Foundation, and Director, Cochrane Eyes and Vision Review Group
12:30 – 1:15 p.m. LUNCH
1:15 – 2:30 p.m. PANEL 4: PREVENTION AND HEALTH PROMOTION INITIATIVES

Moderator: Edwin Marshall, Committee Member

  • National Eye Institute (NEI) Health Education Program
    • Neyal J. Ammary-Risch, National Eye Health Education Program
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×
  • Ohio’s Aging Eye Public–Private Partnership
    • Bonnie Kantor-Burman, Ohio Department of Aging
  • Lessons Learned from Obesity Prevention and Related Promotion Initiatives
    • William Dietz, George Washington University
2:30 – 3:45 p.m. PANEL 5: PERSPECTIVES ON POLICY AND SYSTEM CHANGE

Moderator: Eve Higginbotham, Committee Member

  • Prevention, Treatment, and Rehabilitation: A Three-Pronged Approach to Optimizing Visual Health
    • David Rein, NORC at the University of Chicago
  • Understanding the Impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA)/Health Reform on Vision Coverage and Care Delivery
    • Jeff Spahr, Anthem, Inc.
  • Accomplishing Vision Health Policy Change: Barriers and Opportunities
    • Mark Richert, American Foundation for the Blind
3:45 – 4:00 p.m. BREAK
4:00 – 5:15 p.m. PANEL 6: BUILDING COMMUNITY CAPACITY

Moderator: Joyal Mulheron, Committee Member

  • Determining Priorities and How This Shapes Decisions About Public–Private Partnerships
    • Matt Longjohn, YMCA (via WebEx)
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×
  • Using a Community Health Business Model to Engage Multi-Sectorial Partners
    • Donna Zimmerman, HealthPartners (via WebEx)
  • Exploring Public Health Barriers and Opportunities in Eye Care: The Role of Community Health Centers
    • Susan Primo, Emory University (via WebEx)
  • Building Community Capacity Through Informed Populations: Current Barriers and Needs
    • Anil Lewis, Jernigan Institute at National Federation of the Blind
5:15 – 5:30 p.m. Public Comments
5:30 – 5:35 p.m. Closing Remarks

Steven Teutsch, Committee Chair

5:35 p.m. ADJOURN Open Session
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×

MEETING 3 AGENDA

Committee on Public Health Approaches to Reduce Vision Impairment and Promote Eye Health

Beckman Center of the National Academies
100 Academy Drive, Board Room
Irvine, CA 92617

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2015

10:00 – 10:05 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks

Steven Teutsch, Committee Chair

10:05 – 10:45 a.m. Innovative Approaches to Paying for Eye Care

Moderator: Steven Teutsch, Committee Chair

  • Frank Sloan, Duke University (via WebEx)
10:45 – 11:30 a.m. Building a Surveillance System for Vision

Moderator: Steven Teutsch, Committee Chair

  • David Rein, NORC at the University of Chicago (via WebEx)
11:30 a.m. ADJOURN Open Session
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×
Page 483
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×
Page 484
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×
Page 485
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×
Page 486
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×
Page 487
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×
Page 488
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×
Page 489
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×
Page 490
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The ability to see deeply affects how human beings perceive and interpret the world around them. For most people, eyesight is part of everyday communication, social activities, educational and professional pursuits, the care of others, and the maintenance of personal health, independence, and mobility. Functioning eyes and vision system can reduce an adult’s risk of chronic health conditions, death, falls and injuries, social isolation, depression, and other psychological problems. In children, properly maintained eye and vision health contributes to a child’s social development, academic achievement, and better health across the lifespan.

The public generally recognizes its reliance on sight and fears its loss, but emphasis on eye and vision health, in general, has not been integrated into daily life to the same extent as other health promotion activities, such as teeth brushing; hand washing; physical and mental exercise; and various injury prevention behaviors. A larger population health approach is needed to engage a wide range of stakeholders in coordinated efforts that can sustain the scope of behavior change. The shaping of socioeconomic environments can eventually lead to new social norms that promote eye and vision health.

Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow proposes a new population-centered framework to guide action and coordination among various, and sometimes competing, stakeholders in pursuit of improved eye and vision health and health equity in the United States. Building on the momentum of previous public health efforts, this report also introduces a model for action that highlights different levels of prevention activities across a range of stakeholders and provides specific examples of how population health strategies can be translated into cohesive areas for action at federal, state, and local levels.

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