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Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow (2016)

Chapter: Appendix E: Examples of Recommended Eye Protection for Recreational Sports

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Examples of Recommended Eye Protection for Recreational Sports." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
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E

Examples of Recommended Eye Protection for Recreational Sports

Sport Eye Protection
Baseball Polycarbonate face guard or other certified safe protection attached to the helmet for batting and base running; sports goggles with polycarbonate lensesa for fielding
Basketball Sports goggles with polycarbonate lensesa
Bicycling (LER)b Sturdy street-wear frames with polycarbonate or CR-39 lenses
Boxing None is available
Fencing Full-face cage
Field hockey (both sexes) Goalie: full-face mask; all others: sports goggles with polycarbonate lensesa
Football Polycarbonate shield on helmet
Full-contact martial arts Not allowed
Handball Sports goggles with polycarbonate lensesa
Ice hockey Helmet and full-face protection
Lacrosse (female) Should at least wear sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses and have option to wear helmet and full-face protection
Lacrosse (male) Helmet and full-face protection required
Racquetball Sports goggles with polycarbonate lensesa
Soccer Sports goggles with polycarbonate lensesa
Softball Polycarbonate face guard on a helmet for batting and base running; sports goggles with polycarbonate lensesa for fielding
Squash Sports goggles with polycarbonate lensesa (U.S. Squash, 2016)
Street hockey Sports goggles with polycarbonate lensesa; goalie: full face cagec
Swimming and pool sports Swim goggles recommended
Tennis: singles Sturdy street-wear frames with polycarbonate lenses
Track and field (LER)a Sturdy street-wear frames with polycarbonate or CR-39 lenses
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Examples of Recommended Eye Protection for Recreational Sports." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
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Sport Eye Protection
Water polo Swim goggles with polycarbonate lensesa
Wrestling None is available

NOTE: a Goggles without lenses are not effective.

b For sports in which face masks or helmets with eye protection are worn, functionally one-eyed athletes and those with previous eye trauma or surgery for whom their ophthalmologists recommend eye protection must also wear sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses to ensure protection.

c A street hockey ball can penetrate into a molded goalie mask and injure an eye.

LER = low eye risk.

SOURCES: Reproduced with permission from AAP, 2004.

REFERENCES

AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics). 2004. The National Eye Institute. Finding the right eye protection. Pediatrics 113(3):619–622. https://nei.nih.gov/sports/findingprotection (accessed September 23, 2015).

U.S. Squash. 2016. Protective eyewear. https://www.ussquash.com/officiate/protective-eyewear (accessed May 18, 2016).

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Examples of Recommended Eye Protection for Recreational Sports." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
×
Page 515
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Examples of Recommended Eye Protection for Recreational Sports." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23471.
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Page 516
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The ability to see deeply affects how human beings perceive and interpret the world around them. For most people, eyesight is part of everyday communication, social activities, educational and professional pursuits, the care of others, and the maintenance of personal health, independence, and mobility. Functioning eyes and vision system can reduce an adult’s risk of chronic health conditions, death, falls and injuries, social isolation, depression, and other psychological problems. In children, properly maintained eye and vision health contributes to a child’s social development, academic achievement, and better health across the lifespan.

The public generally recognizes its reliance on sight and fears its loss, but emphasis on eye and vision health, in general, has not been integrated into daily life to the same extent as other health promotion activities, such as teeth brushing; hand washing; physical and mental exercise; and various injury prevention behaviors. A larger population health approach is needed to engage a wide range of stakeholders in coordinated efforts that can sustain the scope of behavior change. The shaping of socioeconomic environments can eventually lead to new social norms that promote eye and vision health.

Making Eye Health a Population Health Imperative: Vision for Tomorrow proposes a new population-centered framework to guide action and coordination among various, and sometimes competing, stakeholders in pursuit of improved eye and vision health and health equity in the United States. Building on the momentum of previous public health efforts, this report also introduces a model for action that highlights different levels of prevention activities across a range of stakeholders and provides specific examples of how population health strategies can be translated into cohesive areas for action at federal, state, and local levels.

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