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State of the Art and Practice in the Assessment of Earthquake-Induced Soil Liquefaction and Its Consequences (2016)

Chapter: Appendix B: Meeting Agendas and Workshop Participants

« Previous: Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas and Workshop Participants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. State of the Art and Practice in the Assessment of Earthquake-Induced Soil Liquefaction and Its Consequences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23474.
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Page 253
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas and Workshop Participants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. State of the Art and Practice in the Assessment of Earthquake-Induced Soil Liquefaction and Its Consequences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23474.
×
Page 254
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas and Workshop Participants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. State of the Art and Practice in the Assessment of Earthquake-Induced Soil Liquefaction and Its Consequences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23474.
×
Page 255
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas and Workshop Participants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. State of the Art and Practice in the Assessment of Earthquake-Induced Soil Liquefaction and Its Consequences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23474.
×
Page 256
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas and Workshop Participants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. State of the Art and Practice in the Assessment of Earthquake-Induced Soil Liquefaction and Its Consequences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23474.
×
Page 257
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas and Workshop Participants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. State of the Art and Practice in the Assessment of Earthquake-Induced Soil Liquefaction and Its Consequences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23474.
×
Page 258
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas and Workshop Participants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. State of the Art and Practice in the Assessment of Earthquake-Induced Soil Liquefaction and Its Consequences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23474.
×
Page 259
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas and Workshop Participants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. State of the Art and Practice in the Assessment of Earthquake-Induced Soil Liquefaction and Its Consequences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23474.
×
Page 260
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas and Workshop Participants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. State of the Art and Practice in the Assessment of Earthquake-Induced Soil Liquefaction and Its Consequences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23474.
×
Page 261
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas and Workshop Participants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. State of the Art and Practice in the Assessment of Earthquake-Induced Soil Liquefaction and Its Consequences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23474.
×
Page 262
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas and Workshop Participants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. State of the Art and Practice in the Assessment of Earthquake-Induced Soil Liquefaction and Its Consequences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23474.
×
Page 263
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas and Workshop Participants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. State of the Art and Practice in the Assessment of Earthquake-Induced Soil Liquefaction and Its Consequences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23474.
×
Page 264

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APPENDIX A 253 YUMEI WANG is a geohazards engineer at the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries and focuses on building resilience to future earthquakes, tsunamis, and landslides. She advised the National Research Council on landslide hazards and earthquake resilience and to the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP), has chaired the Oregon Seismic Safety Policy Advisory Commission, and has taken part in post-earthquake assessments including the 2011 Tohoku, Japan, and 2010 Maule, Chile, disasters. Ms. Wang has performed liquefaction and lateral spreading analyses that include subsurface exploration and paleoseismic investigations, has developed liquefaction hazard maps, and is exploring liquefaction research needs to understand critical infrastructure risk in Oregon. Ms. Wang has been a guest on PBS NewsHour has been interviewed by The New York Times, and has appeared in documentaries produced by NOVA and National Geographic. Ms. Wang has served as Congressional Fellow, sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, in the U.S. Senate in Washington, DC, and has worked as a geotechnical consultant in California. Ms. Wang has a B.S. degree in geological sciences from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and an M.S. degree in civil engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. PREPUBLICATION VERSION – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL REVIEW

Appendix B Meeting Agendas and Workshop Participants Committee on State of the Art and Practice in Earthquake Induced Soil Liquefaction Assesment Meeting 1, November 12, 2013 Keck Center of the National Academies 500 Fifth Street NW, Washington, DC 20001 AGENDA Tuesday, November 12, 2013 OPEN SESSION ROOM 101 9:00 A.M. – 3:00 P.M. 9:00 Welcome, introductions, overview of the Statement of Task Dr. Edward Kavazanjian, NAE, Committee Chair 9:20 Presentations from sponsors—What are the issues facing your organization? Dr. Dave Gillette, Bureau of Reclamation Dr. Thomas Weaver, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Mr. Robert Schweinfurth, Geo-Institute/American Society of Civil Engineers Mr. Antonio Gioiello, Port of Los Angeles 10:40 Break 10:55 Changes since the 1996/1998 Workshops Dr. T. Les Youd, NAE, Brigham Young University (Emeritus) 11:35 Industry practitioner perspective: What are the issues facing practicing engineers? PREPUBLICATION VERSION – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL REVIEW 254

APPENDIX B 255 Dr. Donald Anderson, CH2M Hill 12:05 Working Lunch 1:05 Public-sector dam safety engineer perspective Dr. Craig Davis, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power 1:35 Policy perspective: What are the issues facing policy makers? Mr. Charles Real, California Geological Survey 2:05 General discussion about the statement of task 3:00 Adjourn Open Session PREPUBLICATION VERSION – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL REVIEW

256 STATE OF THE ART AND PRACTICE IN THE ASSESSMENT OF EARTHQUAKE- INDUCED SOIL LIQUEFACTION AND ITS CONSEQUENCES WORKSHOP ON STATE OF THE ART AND PRACTICE IN EARTHQUAKE INDUCED LIQUEFACTION ASSESSMENT Memorial Union Arizona State University 301 E. Orange Street, Tempe, Arizona March 10-11, 2014 AGENDA (detailed agendas for each session are found in corresponding sections of the briefing materials) DAY ONE: Monday, March 10, 2014 7:45 a.m. Check in; Continental breakfast 8:15 Welcome and introductory remarks Edward Kavazanjian, chair, Committee on State of the Art and Practice in Earthquake Induced Soil Liquefaction SESSION 1: CASE HISTORIES/DATA COLLECTION Session moderator: Russell Green, Committee Member 8:30 Plenary Session Statement of Session Goals 8:35 Plenary Speakers: Thomas Holzer, U.S. Geological Survey Peter Robertson, Gregg Drilling and Testing  What are the essential data that must be known or obtained to interpret a liquefaction related phenomena case history?  What are the “critical holes” in the current liquefaction related phenomena case history databases (i.e., what important scenarios/cases are absent or underrepresented in the current databases)? What are the viable approaches to filling these holes? 9:05 Panel Discussion Jonathan Stewart, University of California, Los Angeles Misko Cubrinovski, University of Canterbury Kenji Ishihara, Chuo University, Tokyo 9:45 Break PREPUBLICATION VERSION – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL REVIEW

APPENDIX B 257 9:55 Breakout Sessions Breakout A: Uncertainty in case history documentation Breakout B: Numerical (mechanistic), laboratory, and physical model data Breakout C: Field evidence Breakout D: Characterization of seismic demand 11:10 Break 11:30 Plenary Session Breakout session summaries Noon Lunch SESSION 2: TRIGGERING OF LIQUEFACTION Session moderator: Steve Kramer, Committee Member 1:15 Plenary Session Statement of Session Goals 1:20 Plenary Speaker: Geoffrey Martin, University of Southern California  What are the primary deficiencies in the simplified method for evaluation of liquefaction potential, and how can they be improved?  What is the role of other triggering evaluation procedures in current practice and in the future? 1:40 Panel Discussion Ricardo Dobry, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Donald Anderson, Ch2M Hill Misko Cubrinovski, University of Canterbury Geoff Martin, University of Southern California 2:15 Break 2:25 Breakout Sessions Breakout A: Liquefaction susceptibility Breakout B: Characterization of demand Breakout C: Characterization of resistance Breakout D: Model development 3:55 Break 4:15 Plenary Session Breakout session summaries PREPUBLICATION VERSION – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL REVIEW

258 STATE OF THE ART AND PRACTICE IN THE ASSESSMENT OF EARTHQUAKE- INDUCED SOIL LIQUEFACTION AND ITS CONSEQUENCES 4:45 Description of goals for Day 2 of workshop 5:00 Adjourn for the day DAY TWO: Tuesday, March 11, 2014 8:15 a.m. Check In; Continental breakfast 8:25 Welcome and introductory remarks Edward Kavazanjian, chair, Committee on State of the Art and Practice in Earthquake Induced Soil Liquefaction SESSION 3: CONSEQUENCES OF LIQUEFACTION Session moderator: Lelio Mejia, Committee Member 8:25 Plenary Session Statement of Session Goals Plenary Session topics:  Residual strength and stress-strain-pore pressure behavior  Advanced analytical methods 8:30 Plenary Speakers: Ricardo Dobry, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Michael Beaty, Beaty Engineering LLC  What are the latest developments for the prediction of post-triggering consequences?  What are the main deficiencies in current practice for the assessment of residual shear strength and stress-strain-pore pressure behavior, and what research is needed to address them? 9:00 Open discussion 9:25 Break 9:40 Breakout Session Breakout A: Residual strength characterization Breakout B: Analytical models Breakout C: Simplified methods for settlement and lateral spreading Breakout D: Earth structures and soil structure interaction 11:05 Break PREPUBLICATION VERSION – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL REVIEW

APPENDIX B 259 11:30 Plenary Session Breakout session summaries 12:00 noon Lunch SESSION 4: ALTERNATIVES TO CURRENT PRACTICE AND PATHS FORWARD Session Moderator: José Andrade, Committee Member 1:00 Plenary Session Statement of Session Goals 1:15 Plenary Presentations: Robert Kayen, U.S. Geological Survey Giuseppe Buscarnera, Northwestern University Ronaldo Borja, Stanford University  Mechanics and physics-based models for liquefaction and its consequences and their uncertainties i.e., Multiphase models, numerical models, analytical, constitutive models, etc.  Alternative methods and models for liquefaction and their uncertainties; i.e., strain-based methods, energy-based methods, other possibilities 2:25 Break 2:35 Breakout Sessions Breakout A: Strain and energy-based approaches Breakout B: Analytical models Breakout C: Post-triggering flow behavior Breakout D: Post-triggering stress-strain behavior 3:55 Break 4:15 Plenary Session Breakout session summaries CONCLUDING REMARKS 4:30 Closing Remarks Edward Kavazanjian, Chair 4:45 p.m. Workshop adjourns PREPUBLICATION VERSION – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL REVIEW

260 STATE OF THE ART AND PRACTICE IN THE ASSESSMENT OF EARTHQUAKE- INDUCED SOIL LIQUEFACTION AND ITS CONSEQUENCES Workshop Participants Tarek Abdoun, Rensselaer Polytechnic Shideh Dashti, University of Colorado Institute Boulder Donald Anderson, CH2M Hill Richard Davidson, URS Corporation Scott Anderson, Federal Highway Craig Davis, Los Angeles Department of Administration Water and Power José Andrade, California Institute of Armen Der Kiureghian, University of Technology California, Berkeley Pedro Arduino, University of Washington Steven Dickenson, New Albion Kandiah “Arul” Arulmoli, Earth Mechanics, Geotechnical, Inc. Inc. Ricardo Dobry, Rensselaer Polytechnic Brian Atwater, U.S. Geological Institute Survey/University of Washington Roupen Donikian, Parsons Brinckerhoff Laurie Baise, Tufts University Elizabeth Eide, The National Academies of Jean-Pierre Bardet, The University of Texas Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine at Arlington Kevin Franke, Brigham Young University Steve Bartlett, University of Utah Ian Friedland, Federal Highway Chris Baxter, The University of Rhode Administration Island David Gillette, Bureau of Reclamation Michael Beaty, Beaty Engineering LLC Dan Gillins, Oregon State University Ronaldo Borja, Stanford University Russell Green, Virginia Tech Ross Boulanger, University of California, Les Harder, HDR Engineering Davis Youssef Hashash, University of Illinois Scott Brandenberg, University of California, Tom Holzer, U.S. Geological Survey Los Angeles I.M. Idriss, University of California, Davis Jonathan Bray, University of California, Kenji Ishihara, Chuo University Berkeley Edward Kavazanjian, Jr., Arizona State Giuseppe Buscarnera, Northwestern University University Robert Kayen, U.S. Geological Survey K. Onder Cetin, Middle East Technical University Steven Kramer, University of Washington John Christian, Consulting Engineer Bruce Kutter, University of California, Davis Brady Cox, The University of Texas at Austin Harold Magistrale, FM Global Misko Cubrinovski, University of Sammantha Magsino, The National Canterbury Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Yannis Dafalias, National Technical University of Athens Allen Marr, Geocomp Corporation PREPUBLICATION VERSION – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL REVIEW

APPENDIX B 261 Geoffrey Martin, University of Southern Ray Seed, University of California, California Berkeley Neven Matasovic, Geosyntec Consultants Tom Shantz, California Department of Lelio Mejia, URS Corporation Transportation Jorge Meneses, GEI Consultants Jonathan Stewart, University of California, Los Angeles James Mitchell, Virginia Tech Kenneth Stokoe, The University of Texas at Yoshi Moriwaki, GeoPentech, Inc. Austin Scott Olson, University of Illinois Kohji Takimatsu, Tokyo Institute of Jonathan Porter, Federal Highway Technology Administration Sabanayagam Thevanayagam, SUNY Daniel Pradel, University of California, Los Buffalo Angeles Sjoerd VanBellagooy, Tonkin & Taylor Ellen Rathje, The University of Texas at Yumei Wang, Oregon Department of Austin Geology and Mineral Industries James Rice, Harvard University Rick Wentz, Wentz-Pacific Mike Riemer, University of California, Derek Wittwer, Bureau of Reclamation Berkeley Les Youd, Brigham Young University Peter Robertson, Gregg Drilling and Testing Zia Zafir, Kleinfelder, Inc. Kyle Rollins, Brigham Young University Curt Scheyhing, Group Delta Consultants PREPUBLICATION VERSION – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL REVIEW

262 STATE OF THE ART AND PRACTICE IN THE ASSESSMENT OF EARTHQUAKE- INDUCED SOIL LIQUEFACTION AND ITS CONSEQUENCES Committee on State of the Art and Practice in Earthquake Induced Soil Liquefaction Meeting 3, May 7, 2014 Keck Center of the National Academies 500 Fifth Street NW, Washington, DC 20001 AGENDA Wednesday, May 7, 2014 OPEN SESSION ROOM 101 8:30 A.M. – 1 P.M. 8:30 Welcome, introductions, session overview Dr. Edward Kavazanjian, NAE, Committee Chair 8:40 Liquefaction Resistance of Aged Soil Deposits Dr. Ron Andrus, Clemson University 9:30 Soil Age and Liquefaction Potential Dr. Milan Pavich, U.S. Geological Survey 10:20 Break 10:40 Discussion: other issues related to liquefaction to older sediments? 11:00 Bayesian Thinking Dr. Gregory Baecher, University of Maryland Noon Lunch 1:00 pm Adjourn open session PREPUBLICATION VERSION – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL REVIEW

APPENDIX B 263 Committee on State of the Art and Practice in Earthquake Induced Soil Liquefaction Open Webinar, June 9, 2014 1:00 PM EDT Please contact Courtney Gibbs (cgibbs@nas.edu) to register AGENDA 1:00 pm Welcome, session overview Dr. Edward Kavazanjian, NAE, Committee Chair 1:05 Modeling the Dynamics of Landslides that Liquefy Dr. Richard, Iverson, USGS 1:35 Questions from committee members and discussion 2:00 pm Adjourn open session PREPUBLICATION VERSION – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL REVIEW

264 STATE OF THE ART AND PRACTICE IN THE ASSESSMENT OF EARTHQUAKE- INDUCED SOIL LIQUEFACTION AND ITS CONSEQUENCES Committee on State of the Art and Practice in Earthquake Induced Soil Liquefaction Meeting 4, July 15, 2014 Beckman Center of the National Academies 100 Academy Drive Irvine, CA 92617 949.721.2200 AGENDA Tuesday, July 15, 2014 OPEN SESSION BOARD ROOM 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM 9:00 Dr. Pedro Arduino, University of Washington Numerical modeling of post liquefaction effects 10:00 Open Session Adjourns, break PREPUBLICATION VERSION – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL REVIEW

Next: Appendix C: Histograms (or parameter distributions) of Recent Liquefaction Triggering Databases »
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Earthquake-induced soil liquefaction (liquefaction) is a leading cause of earthquake damage worldwide. Liquefaction is often described in the literature as the phenomena of seismic generation of excess porewater pressures and consequent softening of granular soils. Many regions in the United States have been witness to liquefaction and its consequences, not just those in the west that people associate with earthquake hazards.

Past damage and destruction caused by liquefaction underline the importance of accurate assessments of where liquefaction is likely and of what the consequences of liquefaction may be. Such assessments are needed to protect life and safety and to mitigate economic, environmental, and societal impacts of liquefaction in a cost-effective manner. Assessment methods exist, but methods to assess the potential for liquefaction triggering are more mature than are those to predict liquefaction consequences, and the earthquake engineering community wrestles with the differences among the various assessment methods for both liquefaction triggering and consequences.

State of the Art and Practice in the Assessment of Earthquake-Induced Soil Liquefaction and Its Consequences evaluates these various methods, focusing on those developed within the past 20 years, and recommends strategies to minimize uncertainties in the short term and to develop improved methods to assess liquefaction and its consequences in the long term. This report represents a first attempt within the geotechnical earthquake engineering community to consider, in such a manner, the various methods to assess liquefaction consequences.

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