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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Session Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23481.
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Appendix A

Public Session Agendas

PUBLIC INFORMATION-GATHERING SESSION AGENDA MEETING 1

January 26, 2015

The National Academies Keck Center
500 Fifth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20001

1:10 pm Welcome, Introductions, and Opening Remarks
Eugene Steuerle, Committee Chair
1:30 pm Remarks on Study Statement of Task from Sponsors
Valerie Chang, MacArthur Foundation
Kerry Anne McGeary, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Simon Sommer, Jacobs Foundation (via phone)
1:45 pm Committee Discussion with Sponsors
2:35 pm Public Comments (as needed)
2:45 pm Adjourn Open Session
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Session Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23481.
×

PUBLIC INFORMATION-GATHERING SESSION AGENDA MEETING 2

March 23, 2015

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20418

1:00 pm Welcome, Introductions, and Opening Remarks
Eugene Steuerle, Committee Chair
1:15 pm

Panel 1: The Use of Economic Evidence Decisions
Moderator: Jennifer Brooks, Committee Member

Speakers:

  • Uma Ahluwalia, Montgomery County Maryland, Department of Health and Human Services
  • Barry Anderson, Office of the Executive Director, National Governors Association
  • Nadya Dabby, U.S. Department of Education
  • Dan Rosenbaum, Economic Policy Division, Office of Management and Budget
  • Henry Sobanet and Erick Scheminske (via phone), Colorado Governor’s Office of State Planning and Budgeting
2:45 pm Break
3:00 pm

Panel 2: Facilitating and Overcoming Barriers to the Use of Economic Evidence in Investments
Moderator:
Daniel Max Crowley, Committee Member

Speakers:

  • Jon Baron, Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy
  • Sandra Bishop-Josef, ReadyNation
  • Jerry Croan, Third Sector Capital Partners
  • Stephanie Lee, Washington State Institute for Public Policy
  • Gary VanLandingham, Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative
4:30 pm Public Comments (as needed)
4:45 pm Adjourn Open Session
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Session Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23481.
×

PUBLIC INFORMATION-GATHERING SESSION AGENDA MEETING 3

June 1, 2015

The National Academies Keck Center
500 Fifth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20001

9:45 am Welcome, Introductions, and Opening Remarks
Eugene Steuerle, Committee Chair
10:00 am

Panel 1: Bridging the Gap between Producers and Consumers of Economic Evidence
Moderator:
Ted Miller, Committee Member

Speakers:

  • Will Aldridge, FPG Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Danielle Berfond, The Bridgespan Group
  • John Q. Easton, Spencer Foundation (via WebEx)
  • Mark W. Lipsey, Peabody Research Institute, Vanderbilt University (via WebEx)
11:15 am Break
11:30 am

Panel 2: Barriers to and Advances in the Use of Administrative Data/Integrated Data Systems
Moderator:
Rachel Nugent, Committee Member

Speakers:

  • Robert M. Goerge, Chapin Hall at University of Chicago
  • Carlise King, Early Childhood Data Collaborative, Child Trends
  • Fritz Scheuren, NORC at the University of Chicago
  • Beth A. Virnig, Research Data Assistance Center, University of Minnesota
1:00 pm Adjourn Open Session
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Session Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23481.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Session Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23481.
×
Page 231
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Session Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23481.
×
Page 232
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Session Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23481.
×
Page 233
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Session Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23481.
×
Page 234
Next: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff »
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In recent years, the U.S. federal government has invested approximately $463 billion annually in interventions that affect the overall health and well-being of children and youth, while state and local budgets have devoted almost double that amount. The potential returns on these investments may not only be substantial but also have long-lasting effects for individuals and succeeding generations of their families.

Ideally, those tasked with making these investments would have available to them the evidence needed to determine the cost of all required resources to fully implement and sustain each intervention, the expected returns of the investment, to what extent these returns can be measured in monetary or nonmonetary terms, and who will receive the returns and when. As a result of a number of challenges, however, such evidence may not be effectively produced or applied. Low-quality evidence and/or a failure to consider the context in which the evidence will be used may weaken society’s ability to invest wisely, and also reduce future demand for this and other types of evidence.

Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families highlights the potential for economic evidence to inform investment decisions for interventions that support the overall health and well-being of children, youth, and families. This report describes challenges to the optimal use of economic evidence, and offers recommendations to stakeholders to promote a lasting improvement in its quality, utility, and use.

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