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Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families (2016)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23481.
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Appendix B

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

EUGENE STEUERLE (Chair) is Richard B. Fisher chair and institute fellow at the Urban Institute and a syndicated columnist. Previously, he served in a variety of government positions, including deputy assistant secretary for tax analysis in the U.S. Department of the Treasury and as organizer of the department’s study that led to the Tax Reform Act of 1986. He has also been federal executive fellow at the Brookings Institution and a columnist for the Financial Times. His work as an economist has focused broadly on the federal budget, fiscal policy, and the economy He currently serves on advisory panels or boards for the Congressional Budget Office, the Government Accountability Office, the Joint Committee on Taxation, the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, the Independent Sector, the Aspen Institute Initiative on Financial Security, the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics, and the Partnership for America’s Economic Success. He received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

RICARDO BASURTO-DAVILA is a health economist with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. In his current position in the department’s Policy Analysis Unit, he focuses on increasing the use of quantitative analysis in decision making by leading economic evaluations and policy analysis studies of policies and programs that affect population health. Previously, he held positions as a prevention effectiveness fellow at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where he conducted economic evaluations of the efforts implemented by the United States and other countries to respond to the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. He also previously was with the RAND Corporation, where his work focused on migration,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23481.
×

social, and environmental determinants of health, and inequalities in health and health care. He has a B.A. in economics from Instituto Tecnológico de Monterrey in Mexico, an M.Sc. in economics from the University of Texas at Austin, and a Ph.D. in policy analysis from the Pardee RAND Graduate School.

JENNIFER BROOKS is a senior program officer at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, where her work focuses on the development and implementation of a new national early learning portfolio at the foundation. Previously, she served as the director of Economic, Human Services and Workforce at the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and as the team leader for Head Start research at the Administration for Children and Families at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Her work focuses on using data and evidence to enhance policies and programs for low-income children in a variety of fields, including early learning, child welfare, cash assistance programs, and youth development. She has an M.A. in public policy from the University of Chicago and an M.Sc and a Ph.D. in human development and family studies from Pennsylvania State University.

JEANNE BROOKS-GUNN is the Virginia and Leonard Marx professor of child development at Teachers College and the College of Physicians and Surgeons and director of the National Center for Children and Families, all at Columbia University. Her research focuses on how lives unfold over time and factors that contribute to well-being across childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. She also designs and evaluates intervention programs for children and parents (home visiting programs for pregnant women or new parents, early childhood education programs for toddlers and preschoolers, two generation programs for young children and their parents, and after school programs for older children). She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and the National Academy of Education, and she has received life-time achievement awards from the Society for Research in Child Development, the American Academy of Political and Social Science, the American Psychological Society, American Psychological Association, and the Society for Research on Adolescence. She has a M.Ed. from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in human learning and development from the University of Pennsylvania.

BARBARA CHOW is program director of education with the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. Previously, she served as policy director for the Budget Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives, executive director of the National Geographic Education Foundation, and vice president for education and children’s programs at National Geographic. She also

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23481.
×

previously served as special assistant to President Clinton for legislative affairs and as the White House liaison to Congress on economic, budget, and appropriation matters. She also previously worked in the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, where she was the program associate director for education, income maintenance, and labor; as the deputy director of the White House Domestic Policy Council; on the staff of the U.S. Senate Budget Committee; and as a manager of federal budget policy at Price Waterhouse. She has a master’s degree in public policy from the University of California, Berkeley.

PHAEDRA CORSO is the University of Georgia Foundation professor of human health, founding head of the Department of Health Policy and Management, director of the Economic Evaluation Research Group in the College of Public Health, associate director of the Owens Institute for Behavioral Research, and adjunct faculty at the School of Public and International Affairs, all at the University of Georgia. Her research interests include economic evaluation of public health interventions; quality-of-life assessment for vulnerable populations; evaluation of preferences for health risks; and the prevention of violence, injury, and substance use. Previously, she held several positions at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, including as an economic analyst in the area of violence prevention. She has a Ph.D. in health policy from Harvard University.

DANIEL MAX CROWLEY is an assistant professor at Pennsylvania State University and a research fellow with the National Bureau of Economic Research studying the economics of investing in healthy development. He is particularly interested in preventing illness and criminal behavior through evidence-based interventions in early life. His work sits at the intersection of human development economics, and public policy. This research focuses primarily on (1) strengthening economic evaluations of preventive interventions, (2) facilitating evidence-based policy making through strategic investments in preventive services, and (3) evaluating the utility of performance-based financing to access new resources for improving health. He has a Ph.D. in human development and family studies from Pennsylvania State University.

JODY L. FITZPATRICK recently retired from the School of Public Affairs and director of the Master in Public Administration Program at the University of Colorado Denver. Her work has focused on conducting evaluations in education, social services, and employment, with a particular focus on women and families. Her interests include context and its influence on evaluation, evaluation use, and measurement. She has served on the board

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23481.
×

and as president of the American Evaluation Association She has a Ph.D. in program evaluation from the University of Texas at Austin.

LEIGH MILES JACKSON (Study Director) is a program officer with the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. Previously, she was a developmental psychopathology and neurogenomics research fellow at Vanderbilt University, where she investigated the role of chronic sleep disturbance on the health and epigenetic outcomes of adolescents. She has a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Wake Forest University and a Ph.D. in molecular and systems pharmacology from Emory University.

LYNN A. KAROLY is a senior economist at the RAND Corporation and a professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School. Her recent research has focused on human capital investments, social welfare policy, child and family well-being, and U.S. labor markets. In the area of child policy, much of her research has focused on early childhood programs, particularly early care and education programs. For those programs, she has studied their use and quality, the system of publicly subsidizing them, professional development for their workforce, and quality rating and improvement systems. In related work, she has examined the costs, benefits, and economic returns of early childhood interventions and youth development programs, and she has assessed the use of benefit-cost analysis to evaluate social programs. She has a Ph.D. in economics from Yale University.

BRIDGET KELLY (Senior Program Officer) was on the staff of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. Previously, she served as the study director for the Committee on the Science of Children Birth to Age 8: Deepening and Broadening the Foundation for Success. She also worked for projects on global chronic diseases; country-level decision making; benefit-cost analysis for early childhood interventions; prevention of mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders; and depression, parenting practices, and child development. She has a B.A. in biology and neuroscience from Williams College and an M.D. and a Ph.D. in neurobiology from Duke University.

NOAM KEREN (Research Associate) is on the staff of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. In addition to his work on this study, he is working on the Forum on Promoting Children’s Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health. Previously, he conducted research in psychology and neuroscience, investigating the neurobiology underlying cognitive functions using behavioral measures and advanced neuroimaging methods. He also served as a science writer and foreign news editor for the Israeli Air Force Magazine. He has a B.Sc. in psychology from the University of Florida and an M.A. in psychology from Washington University in St. Louis.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23481.
×

MARGARET KUKLINSKI is a research scientist at the Social Development Research Group in the School of Social Work at the University of Washington. Her multidisciplinary work covers economics, clinical and community psychology, and child development. She is broadly interested in the design and analysis of prevention interventions that promote positive youth development and are economically viable. Her current projects include the Community Youth Development Study, a multisite randomized controlled trial of the Communities That Care prevention system, for which she is working on economic and benefit-cost analysis of long-term effects. She is also the principal investigator on an evaluation of the Seattle Public Schools High School Graduation Initiative, which aims to prevent students from dropping out and improve high school graduation rates, academic performance, and disciplinary problems among high-risk students. She has a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California, Berkeley.

TARA MAINERO (Associate Program Officer) is on the staff of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. In addition to her work on this project, she has served as staff lead for a consensus study dissemination strategy, a forum collaborative, and a workshop youth advisory group. Previously, she was on the staff of the Children’s Defense Fund and with the D.C. Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services. She has a master’s degree in social work with a concentration in social change.

TED R. MILLER is principal research scientist and director of the Public Services Research Institute at the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation. He is also an adjunct professor at West Virginia University School of Public Health and Curtin University Centre for Population Health Research. He is currently taking part in the Global Burden of Disease measurement effort. His work in the field of economics has concentrated on the costs of societal ills, savings from prevention, and methods for analyzing the return on investment in prevention. He has applied his cost estimates to estimate the return on investment and cost per quality-adjusted life year for more than 160 injuries, violence, and substance abuse interventions, most of them focused on youth. He has master’s degrees in operations research and city planning and a Ph.D. in regional science (spatial economics) from the University of Pennsylvania.

RACHEL NUGENT is vice president of the Chronic Noncommunicable Diseases Global Initiative at RTI International. Prior to this position, she was a clinical associate professor in the Department of Global Health at the University of Washington. She is also the principal investigator of the Disease Control Priorities. Previously, she served as deputy director of Global Health at the Center for Global Development, director of health and eco-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23481.
×

nomics at the Population Reference Bureau, program director of Health and Economics Programs at the Fogarty International Center of the National Institutes of Health, and senior economist at the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. She served as an adviser to the World Health Organization, various U.S. agencies, and nonprofit organizations on the economics and policy environment of noncommunicable diseases. She has a Ph.D. in economics from George Washington University.

OLGA ACOSTA PRICE is an associate professor in the Department of Prevention and Community Health at the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University. She is also director of the Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, a national resource and technical assistance center committed to building effective school health programs. Previously, she was director of the School Mental Health Program at the Department of Mental Health in Washington, D.C.; assistant professor at the University of Maryland’s School of Medicine; and associate director of the Center for School Mental Health Assistance, a national technical assistance center, where she helped to promote the development of school-based mental health services across the country. She has a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the State University of New York at Buffalo.

ANNE SHERIDAN is an independent consultant at Sheridan & Associates where she provides independent project management, outreach, research, and government relations services to political and issue organizations, and coalitions. Formerly, she served as the executive director of Office for Children for the governor of Maryland, where she chaired the Children’s Cabinet, which is comprised of the secretaries of the Departments of Budget and Management, Disabilities, Health and Mental Hygiene, Human Resources, and Juvenile Services, as well as the state superintendent of schools. In that capacity, she worked on allocating funds for distribution to state agencies, local governments, and public and private organizations, and partnered with the local management boards to plan, coordinate, and monitor the delivery of priority services in local jurisdictions. Prior to this work, she managed the Maryland No Kid Hungry Campaign for Share Our Strength, a national nonprofit organization working to end childhood hunger. She has a B.A. in economics from Simmons College and an M.Sc. in foreign service from Georgetown University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23481.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23481.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23481.
×
Page 237
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23481.
×
Page 238
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23481.
×
Page 239
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23481.
×
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In recent years, the U.S. federal government has invested approximately $463 billion annually in interventions that affect the overall health and well-being of children and youth, while state and local budgets have devoted almost double that amount. The potential returns on these investments may not only be substantial but also have long-lasting effects for individuals and succeeding generations of their families.

Ideally, those tasked with making these investments would have available to them the evidence needed to determine the cost of all required resources to fully implement and sustain each intervention, the expected returns of the investment, to what extent these returns can be measured in monetary or nonmonetary terms, and who will receive the returns and when. As a result of a number of challenges, however, such evidence may not be effectively produced or applied. Low-quality evidence and/or a failure to consider the context in which the evidence will be used may weaken society’s ability to invest wisely, and also reduce future demand for this and other types of evidence.

Advancing the Power of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families highlights the potential for economic evidence to inform investment decisions for interventions that support the overall health and well-being of children, youth, and families. This report describes challenges to the optimal use of economic evidence, and offers recommendations to stakeholders to promote a lasting improvement in its quality, utility, and use.

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