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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Opportunities to Improve Representation of Clouds and Aerosols in Climate Models with Classified Observing Systems: Proceedings of a Workshop: Abbreviated Version. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23527.
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Appendix G
Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members


Dr. Pamela G. Emch, Chair
Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems

Dr. Pamela G. Emch is a senior staff engineer/scientist with Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems in Redondo Beach, California. She works in Northrop’s Space Systems business area on weather, climate, and environmental remote sensing and information technology activities supporting the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Department of Defense, and international customers. From 2005 to 2007 she was system engineering, integration, and test lead on Northrop’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-R Program Definition and Design Risk Reduction (PDRR) Program. Before working on GOES-R, Dr. Emch spent eight years on Northrop’s National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Program, the last two years of which she relocated to Washington, DC, to serve as Northrop’s system engineering and science interface to the NPOESS government program office in Silver Spring, Maryland. Prior to that Dr. Emch managed development of end-to-end physics/instrument/satellite remote sensing simulations, oversaw the archives for environmental multimedia data, and led environmental data-collection and application activities for hyperspectral airborne instruments. Dr. Emch holds an M.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Southern California and a B.A. in mathematics and a Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles, specializing in water resources with a minor in atmospheric sciences. She is a past chair of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) Board on Enterprise Economic Development, a member of the Executive Committee of the AMS Commission on the Weather and Climate Enterprise, and a co-chair of the Weather Coalition. She was a member of National Research Council’s Committee on the Assessment on the National Weather Service’s Modernization Program. Dr. Pamela Emch is a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate.

Dr. Steven Ghan
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Dr. Steven Ghan is a climate scientist in the Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. His research is to understand the atmospheric processes that drive regional and global earth systems, with a primary focus on climate, aerosol, and cloud physics; global and regional scale modeling; integrated assessment; and complex regional meteorology and chemistry. Dr. Ghan’s work involves a combination of development, evaluation, and application of parameterizations for climate models. For the past 15 years, he has also focused his research on the representation of the subgrid influence or orography on atmospheric and land surface processes. He is a member of the American Geophysical Union and an editor (2007 to present) and editor-in-chief (2012 to present) for the Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. Dr. Ghan earned his B.S. in atmospheric science at the University of Washington and his M.S. and Ph.D. in meteorology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. From 2009 to the present he is a member of the Science and Infrastructure Steering Committee, Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Systems Research Program and Co-chair of the Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group (2009 to the present). Dr. Ghan was a member of the ARM Climate Research Facility Science Board (2010-2012). From 2012 to the present, he is Co-chair, Climate and Chemistry Working Group for the Community Earth System Model and on the External

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Opportunities to Improve Representation of Clouds and Aerosols in Climate Models with Classified Observing Systems: Proceedings of a Workshop: Abbreviated Version. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23527.
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Advisory Panel for the National Science Foundation’s Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes.

Dr. Everette Joseph
State University of New York at Albany

Dr. Everette Joseph is Director of the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center at the State University of New York at Albany. Prior to that, he was on the faculty at the Howard University Program in Atmospheric Sciences (HUPAS), which he directed from 2008-2013. Joseph has conducted extensive research observing the role of aerosols and certain gases on climate and weather from field observations in the Mid-Atlantic to marine expeditions across the Atlantic Ocean. HUPAS, through the work of Joseph and his colleagues, significantly increased the number of minority Ph.D. graduates in the atmospheric sciences nationally over the past 10 years. At Howard, he led the Climate and Radiation Group, a core research component in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. There he also led the development of a major field observation program with university, government, and industry partners designed to improve the ability of satellites to monitor the atmosphere from space and the skill of atmospheric models to better forecast weather, climate and air quality. Joseph has participated on a variety of advisory boards, including the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Science Board, the American Meteorological Society Board on Higher Education, and the NASA Science Mission Directorate Research and Analysis Management Operations Working Group. He presently serves on the Board of Trustees of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, which manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research, a federally funded research and development center supported by the National Science Foundation. He earned his Ph.D. from the State University of New York at Albany's Department of Physics in 1997, and spent one year in the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center (ASRC) as a postdoctoral research associate. Dr. Joseph is a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate.

Dr. Sonia M. Kreidenweis
Colorado State University

Dr. Sonia Kreidenweis is a professor of atmospheric science at Colorado State University. She spent three years as an assistant professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at San Jose State University, where she received the Meritorious performance and Professional Promise Award for two consecutive years for her accomplishments in research and teaching. Dr. Kreidenweis also served as a consultant in aerosol and chemical interactions in the atmosphere at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In 1993 she was named an Office of Naval Rsearch Young Investigator. Her research focuses on characterization of the physical, chemical, and optical properties of atmospheric particulate matter, and the effects of the atmospheric aerosol on visibility and climate. She has conducted field studies in several U.S. national parks to establish the sources and characteristics of particulate matter responsible for visibility degradation, with a recent focus on the impacts of prescribed and wild fires. Ongoing laboratory and field studies have investigated the role of particles and of individual compounds found in particulate matter in the nucleation of cloud droplets and ice crystals. Dr. Kreidenweis is a past president of the American Association for Aerosol Research. She received her B.E. in chemical engineering from Manhattan College and her M.S. and Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the California Institute of Technology.

Dr. Michael J. Prather
University of California, Irvine

Dr. Michael J. Prather is Professor of Earth System Science at the University of California, Irvine. His research focuses on the simulation of the physical, chemical, and biological processes that determine atmospheric composition; development of detailed numerical models of photochemistry and atmospheric radiation; and global chemical transport models that describe ozone and other trace gases. Post-Ph.D., Dr. Prather was a research fellow at Harvard University and then a scientist at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Opportunities to Improve Representation of Clouds and Aerosols in Climate Models with Classified Observing Systems: Proceedings of a Workshop: Abbreviated Version. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23527.
×

including also managing NASA headquarters programs on upper atmosphere and aviation impacts. A fellow of the American Geophysical Union and a member of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, he served from 1997 through 2001 as Editor-in-Chief of Geophysical Research Letters. He received a B.A. in mathematics from Yale University, a B.A. in physics from the University of Oxford, and a Ph.D. in astronomy and astrophysics from Yale University. Prather currently participates in key United Nations’ environmental efforts, including the international ozone assessments (1985, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1994, 2010, 2014) and climate assessments (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: 1992, 1995, 1995, 1999, 2001, 2007, 2013, 2014). Dr. Prather has served on numerous NRC committees, most recently as a member of the Assessment of NASA’s Earth Science Programs. He also previously served on the Committee on Methods for Estimating Greenhouse Gas Emissions, the Panel on Climate Variability and Change of the 2007 decadal survey on Earth science and applications from space, and the Committee for Review of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program Strategic Plan. Dr. Prather is a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on a Framework for Analyzing the Needs for Continuity of NASA-Sustained Remote Sensing Observations of the Earth from Space. Dr. Prather is also a member of the Measurements of Earth Data for Environmental Analysis program.

Dr. Jeffrey S. Reid
Naval Research Laboratory

Dr. Jeffrey Reid is a meteorologist and aerosol scientist in the Marine Meteorology Division at the Naval Research Laboratory in Monterey, California. His research is in the area of aerosol observability, with an emphasis on regional aerosol environments and aerosol data assimilation. Dr. Reid works to improve electro-optical systems and retrieval algorithms for environmental monitoring. A veteran of numerous field campaigns, Dr. Reid is currently the Mission Scientist for the 7 Southeast Asian studies (7SEAS), a grass roots effort to link western and Asian researchers, and to understand the Southeast Asian aerosol environment and its potential impacts on the earth system. From 1998 to 2002, he was a project scientist at the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, San Diego, where he led several field missions directed towards aerosol parameterization development and model verification. Dr. Reid earned his B.S. in applied physics (quantum optics) at the University of California, Davis, in 1991. His undergraduate work was in experimental aerosol science with an emphasis on nuclear techniques for aerosol analysis. In 1993 he earned his M.S. in atmospheric science at the University of California, Davis, where he studied issues related to dust production and transport. At the University of Washington, Seattle, in 1998, Dr. Reid earned his Ph.D. in atmospheric science; he studied chemical evolution and optical properties of biomass burning smoke. Dr. Reid also devotes a great deal of time to international collaboration, development and outreach and he was a founding organizer of several cooperative workshops on biomass burning and aerosol prediction.

Dr. Robert Wood
University of Washington

Dr. Robert Wood is Associate Professor of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Washington. He is responsible for the development of a program of research centered on the understanding of cloud physical processes; he also teaches the undergraduate and graduate programs in atmospheric sciences. From 2004 to 2010, Dr. Wood was research assistant professor and then assistant professor. As a research associate, he studied boundary layer cloud structure, variability, and microphysical processes. At the Meteorological Research Flight Office in the United Kingdom from 1997 to 2001, he was a scientist who did research on boundary layer cloud microphysical processes and structural properties; he was also responsible for planning and executing aircraft-based field programs. Dr. Wood is the editor of the Journal of Climate since 2009. In 2011 he received the Henry G. Houghton Award from the American Meteorological Society for advancing understanding of the interactions between cloud droplets, aerosols, radiation, and precipitation in marine stratocumulus. He received the Editors’ Citation for Excellence in Refereeing for the Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres in 2007. From the Royal Meteorological Society in 2001, Dr. Wood received the L.F. Richardson Prize which is awarded annually for a meritorious paper that was published in a society journal during the preceding four years, and was contributed by a member of the society who is in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Opportunities to Improve Representation of Clouds and Aerosols in Climate Models with Classified Observing Systems: Proceedings of a Workshop: Abbreviated Version. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23527.
×

their early career in meteorology. Dr. Wood is a co-author of more than 60 journal articles on atmospheric sciences. He holds a B.A in natural sciences (physics and theoretical physics) from the University of Cambridge and a Ph.D. in atmospheric physics from the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology, United Kingdom.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Opportunities to Improve Representation of Clouds and Aerosols in Climate Models with Classified Observing Systems: Proceedings of a Workshop: Abbreviated Version. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23527.
×
Page 39
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Opportunities to Improve Representation of Clouds and Aerosols in Climate Models with Classified Observing Systems: Proceedings of a Workshop: Abbreviated Version. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23527.
×
Page 40
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Opportunities to Improve Representation of Clouds and Aerosols in Climate Models with Classified Observing Systems: Proceedings of a Workshop: Abbreviated Version. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23527.
×
Page 41
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Opportunities to Improve Representation of Clouds and Aerosols in Climate Models with Classified Observing Systems: Proceedings of a Workshop: Abbreviated Version. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23527.
×
Page 42
Opportunities to Improve Representation of Clouds and Aerosols in Climate Models with Classified Observing Systems: Proceedings of a Workshop: Abbreviated Version Get This Book
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One of the most significant and uncertain aspects of climate change projections is the impact of aerosols on the climate system. Aerosols influence the climate indirectly by interacting with nearby clouds leading to small changes in cloud cover, thickness, and altitude, which significantly affect Earth’s radiative balance. Advancements have been made in recent years on understanding the complex processes and atmospheric interactions involved when aerosols interact with surrounding clouds, but further progress has been hindered by limited observations.

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine organized a workshop to discuss the usefulness of the classified observing systems in advancing understanding of cloud and aerosol interactions. Because these systems were not developed with weather and climate modeling as a primary mission objective, many participants said it is necessary for scientists to find creative ways to utilize the data. The data from these systems have the potential to be useful in advancing understanding of cloud and aerosol interactions. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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