National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Appendix A: World Caf Models
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Private Sector as a Catalyst for Health Equity and a Vibrant Economy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23529.
×

Appendix B

Workshop Agenda

ROUNDTABLE ON THE PROMOTION OF HEALTH EQUITY AND THE ELIMINATION OF HEALTH DISPARITIES

November 5, 2015
Chicago, Illinois

The Private Sector as a Catalyst for Health Equity and a Vibrant Economy

Our country’s economic vitality is dependent on ensuring that all Americans contribute and prosper. This vitality includes an intentional focus on achieving the highest level of health possible. This demands a focus on health equity that can only occur when conditions in communities, schools, workplaces, and other environments are health promoting. Elements of health-promoting opportunities include healthy housing, revitalized and healthy neighborhoods, access to healthy and affordable foods, safe places to play and promote physical activity, good transportation, safe water systems, strong social networks, and good jobs with living wages and benefits. These opportunity-rich environments serve as a buffer from the onslaught of toxic conditions that many people face on a daily basis. An equity-focused agenda must be at the center of all these efforts, making sure that those who are often left out will have voice in decisions that affect them and that they are offered a range of opportunities that will help them become healthier.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Private Sector as a Catalyst for Health Equity and a Vibrant Economy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23529.
×

Both private and public business sectors are partnering with others to change these conditions. Many are taking the lead in producing economic growth that is inclusive and responsive to the nation’s diverse needs and populations. Increasingly, private–public partnerships are emerging as new ways of doing business. This workshop will explore new business models that offer a triple bottom line: (1) improved employee health; (2) healthy community/work environments; and (3) economic opportunity (workforce development) and growth.

Audiences for this workshop include businesses and corporations, governmental agencies, sectors outside of health (housing, education, planning, and transportation), philanthropy, policy makers, and new emerging leaders in health.

8:30–8:45 Welcome and Overview

Mildred Thompson, M.S.W.

Senior Director, PolicyLink

Melissa Simon, M.D., M.P.H.

George H. Gardner Professor of Clinical Gynecology

Vice Chair of Clinical Research, Department of

Obstetrics and Gynecology

Feinberg School of Medicine

Northwestern University

Jabbar R. Bennett, Ph.D.

Associate Provost, Diversity and Inclusion

Associate Professor of Medicine

Northwestern University

Clyde Yancy, M.D., M.Sc.

Vice Dean for Diversity & Inclusion

Magerstadt Professor of Medicine

Feinberg School of Medicine

Northwestern University

8:45–9:45

Keynote Speaker

Moderator

Mildred Thompson, M.S.W.

William Spriggs, Ph.D.

Department of Economics, Howard University, and

Chief Economist, AFL-CIO

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Private Sector as a Catalyst for Health Equity and a Vibrant Economy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23529.
×

9:45–10:00

Break

10:00–11:30

Panel 1: Transforming Communities

Neighborhoods are being improved through enhancements such as having better access to healthy foods, safe parks, bicycle pathways, affordable, mixed income housing, better transportation and extensive community revitalization. These strategies require a multisector approach, visionary leadership, and long-term investments. Often there are private–public partnerships and broad community engagement. We will learn what it will take to drive this change. What are catalysts for action and what results are beginning to emerge?

Moderator

Mildred Thompson, M.S.W.

Kelly N. Fischer, M.A.

Staff Analyst, Injury & Violence Prevention Program

Los Angeles County Department of Health

Latricia Tillman, M.P.H.

Director for Public Health

Multnomah County Health Department

Travis Watson

Communications Manager & Senior Organizer

Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative

11:30–1:00

Lunch: World Café

This informal small-group exercise is intended to showcase models in which businesses are embracing health equity values and practices, either intentionally or unintentional, but which lead to health promoting benefits. Participants will rotate through the various tables, ask questions, engage in conversations, and learn about promising new ideas.

Massive Open Online Course (MOOC)

“Career 911: Your Future Job in Medicine and Healthcare”

Melissa Simon, M.D., M.P.H.

Shaneah Taylor, M.P.H.

Emmanuel Cordova

Northwestern University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Private Sector as a Catalyst for Health Equity and a Vibrant Economy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23529.
×

Regine R. Rucker, Ph.D., M.P.A.

Program Coordinator, Health Sciences and Personal

Care Services, Career and Technical Education,

Early College and Career Education, Office of

College and Career Success

Chicago Public Schools

Consortium to Lower Obesity in Chicago Children (CLOCC)

Sarah B. Welch, M.P.H.

Community Research & Evaluation Associate Director

Chinese American Service League (CASL)

Esther Wong

Executive Director and Co-Founder

Lurie Children’s Hospital–Chase Bank Partnership’s Chase Your Dream Program

Maria Rivera

Manager, Workforce Development

Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago

David S. Sperling

GEAR UP Program Manager

Center for College Access and Success

Northeastern Illinois University

Street Level Health Project, Oakland, California

Jae Maldonado

Executive Director

National Business Group on Health

Joneyse Perkins Gatling, CHES

Assistant Manager, Award & Recognition Programs

1:00–2:30 Panel 2: Improving Individual Health

In this session, we will learn how businesses are making gains in improving employee health and contributing to health equity. An exciting trend is under way that is creating jobs and career pathways for some of our nation’s highest-risk populations: home health care workers, those with long-term unemployment, and those returning from prison. Highlights on

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Private Sector as a Catalyst for Health Equity and a Vibrant Economy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23529.
×

promising opportunities to reverse this trend will be shared. In addition, a new business model seems to be emerging in which attention is placed on creating work environments that are health promoting, family supportive, and contribute to a better bottom line for employers, employees, and the economy. Beyond traditional employee benefits, many companies are instituting lucrative incentives, such as flexible working hours, onsite meals and recreational teams, child care, and other creative benefits.

Moderator

Nicole Hewitt, Ph.D.

Social Science Research Analyst

Data and Policy Analytics Group

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Office of Minority Health

Brenda Palms Barber

Chief Executive Officer

Sweet Beginnings, LLC

Bechara Choucair, M.D., M.S.

Senior Vice President for Safety Net Transformation and Community

Benefit, Trinity Health

Rebecca L. Spencer (videoconference)

Director of Benefits

Marriott International

2:30–2:45

Break

2:45–4:15

Panel 3: Workforce Development and Community Health

There is a movement in workforce development programs that showcase private–public partnerships that also helps develop communities. Leveraging the resources of businesses and organizations to develop the workforce is an important approach to imparting social capital to surrounding communities. There are companies across multiple sectors that have workforce development programs for students and employees across the spectrum of career levels.

Moderator

Melissa Simon, M.D., M.P.H.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Private Sector as a Catalyst for Health Equity and a Vibrant Economy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23529.
×

Lisa R. Hampton

Programming and Public Affairs Manager-Midwest LeadersUp

Joanne G. Schwartzberg, M.D.

Scholar-in-Residence

Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education

Kyle Westbrook

Executive Director of Education Policy

Office of Mayor Rahm Emanuel

4:30–5:00

Concluding Reflections

Stephanie Taylor, Ph.D.

Director, USA Cluster Lead—Vaccines

Center for Observational and Real-World Evidence (CORE)

Merck & Co., Inc.

5:00

Workshop Adjourns

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Private Sector as a Catalyst for Health Equity and a Vibrant Economy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23529.
×
Page 53
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Private Sector as a Catalyst for Health Equity and a Vibrant Economy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23529.
×
Page 54
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Private Sector as a Catalyst for Health Equity and a Vibrant Economy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23529.
×
Page 55
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Private Sector as a Catalyst for Health Equity and a Vibrant Economy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23529.
×
Page 56
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Private Sector as a Catalyst for Health Equity and a Vibrant Economy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23529.
×
Page 57
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Private Sector as a Catalyst for Health Equity and a Vibrant Economy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23529.
×
Page 58
Next: Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches »
The Private Sector as a Catalyst for Health Equity and a Vibrant Economy: Proceedings of a Workshop Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $44.00 Buy Ebook | $35.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

A critical component of the nation’s economic vitality is ensuring that all Americans can contribute and prosper. Such contributions presuppose an intentional focus on achieving the highest levels of health possible, which requires that conditions in communities, schools workplaces, and other settings promote health and address the social determinants of health for all community members. Many organizations, in both the private and public sectors, have been establishing partnerships to further healthy workplaces and health equity in general. Many are taking the lead in producing economic growth that is inclusive and responsive to the nation’s diverse needs and populations. Increasingly, private–public partnerships are emerging as ways of doing business. Additionally, a variety of new developments in health, health care, and community benefits obligations that are part of the Affordable Care Act have contributed to this interest in economic growth and health and in the creation of new partnerships.

To examine past successes and future opportunities, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine held a workshop in November 2015. The workshop focused on the potential of the private sector to produce a triple bottom line: economic opportunity (including workforce development) and growth, healthy work and community environments, and improved employee health. At the same time, participants looked beyond the private sector to public–private partnerships and to public-sector actions that combine opportunities for economic growth and good health for all. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!