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Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Seeing Students Learn Science: Integrating Assessment and Instruction in the Classroom. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23548.
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Acknowledgments

This book was made possible by the sponsorship of the Carnegie Corporation of New York. It is based on the 2014 National Research Council (NRC) report Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards, which was made possible by the S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation.

A group of expert practitioners and researchers in the field of science education served as consultants and provided ongoing input in the development of this book. Their invaluable guidance throughout the process is acknowledged with appreciation. This group included Kenneth Huff, Williamsville Central School District, East Amherst, New York; Peter McLaren, Next Gen Education, LLC; William Penuel, School of Education, University of Colorado Boulder; K. Renae Pullen, Caddo Parish Schools, Shreveport, Louisiana; Brian Reiser, School of Education and Social Policy, Northwestern University; and Nancy Butler Songer, School of Education, Drexel University.

Special thanks are also due to Judy Koenig, who helped to ensure that the book was technically accurate and faithful to the parent report on which it is based; and to Kelly Arrington and Matthew Lammers, who provided able administrative support throughout the project. The thoughtful advice contributed by Stephen Mautner of the National Academies Press throughout the process is also gratefully acknowledged.

The final draft of this book was reviewed by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making the published book as sound as possible and to ensure that the book meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the

Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Seeing Students Learn Science: Integrating Assessment and Instruction in the Classroom. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23548.
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charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the deliberative process.

These six individuals are acknowledged with gratitude for their review of this book: Sarah Bax, Eighth Grade Mathematics Teacher, Hardy Middle School, District of Columbia Public Schools; Catherine Bowler, Administrator for Science and Technology/Engineering Test Development, Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, Malden, Massachusetts; Matthew Krehbiel, Science Associate Director, Achieve, Inc.; Scott Marion, Executive Director, Center for Assessment; Amy L. Reese, Coordinator, Elementary Science, Howard County Public School System, Ellicott City, Maryland; and Darren Wells, Sixth Grade Science and Engineering Teacher, James P. Timilty Middle School, Boston Public Schools.

Although the reviewers listed above provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they did not see the final draft of the book before its release. The review of this book was overseen by Patricia Morison of the National Academies. She was responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this book was carried out in accordance with institutional procedures and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final content of this book rests entirely with the author.

Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Seeing Students Learn Science: Integrating Assessment and Instruction in the Classroom. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23548.
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Page 117
Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Seeing Students Learn Science: Integrating Assessment and Instruction in the Classroom. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23548.
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Page 118
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Science educators in the United States are adapting to a new vision of how students learn science. Children are natural explorers and their observations and intuitions about the world around them are the foundation for science learning. Unfortunately, the way science has been taught in the United States has not always taken advantage of those attributes. Some students who successfully complete their K–12 science classes have not really had the chance to “do” science for themselves in ways that harness their natural curiosity and understanding of the world around them.

The introduction of the Next Generation Science Standards led many states, schools, and districts to change curricula, instruction, and professional development to align with the standards. Therefore existing assessments—whatever their purpose—cannot be used to measure the full range of activities and interactions happening in science classrooms that have adapted to these ideas because they were not designed to do so. Seeing Students Learn Science is meant to help educators improve their understanding of how students learn science and guide the adaptation of their instruction and approach to assessment. It includes examples of innovative assessment formats, ways to embed assessments in engaging classroom activities, and ideas for interpreting and using novel kinds of assessment information. It provides ideas and questions educators can use to reflect on what they can adapt right away and what they can work toward more gradually.

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