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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Seeing Students Learn Science: Integrating Assessment and Instruction in the Classroom. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23548.
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References

Farkash, L., Michael, N., Purdie-Dyer, R., McGill, T., Novak, M., and Reiser, B.J. (2016). Why is our corn changing?: Elementary NGSS 2nd grade unit. Available: http://www.nextgenstorylines.org/why-is-our-corn-changing [August 2016].

Furtak, E.M., and Heredia, S.C. (2014). Exploring the influence of learning progressions in two teacher communities. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 51(8), 982–1020.

Huff, K., and Duschl, R. (2016). Get in the Game—Planning and Implementing Coherent Learning Progressions, Sequences, and Storylines. Unpublished paper.

Huff, K., and Lange, C. (2010). SSSNOW Project: Helping Make Science Cool for Students. Science Scope, 33(5), 36–41.

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. (2007). Climate Change 2007: Impacts, Adaption, Vulnerability. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Krajcik, J., Reiser, B.J., Sutherland, L.M., and Fortus, D. (2013). Investigating and Questioning Our World Through Science and Technology. Second ed. Greenwich, CT: Sangari Active Science.

Lehrer, R. (2011). Learning to Reason About Variability and Chance by Inventing Measures and Models. Paper presented at the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, Orlando, FL.

Lucas, D., Broderick, N., Lehrer, R., and Bohanan, R. (2005). Making the grounds of scientific inquiry visible in the classroom. Science Scope, 29(3), 39–42.

McGraw-Hill Education. (2008). Science, A Closer Look, Grade 4, Teacher Edition—Earth Science. Columbus, OH: Author.

National Research Council. (2000). How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition. Committee on Developments in the Science of Learning. J.D. Bransford, A.L. Brown, and R.R. Cocking, eds. Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

National Research Council. (2005). How Students Learn: Science in the Classroom. Committee on How People Learn, A Targeted Report for Teachers. M.S. Donovan and J.D. Bransford, eds. Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council. (2006). Systems for State Science Assessment. Committee on Test Design for K–12 Science Achievement. M.R. Wilson and M.W. Bertenthal, eds. Board on Testing and Assessment, Center for Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council. (2012). A Framework for K–12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas. Committee on a Conceptual Framework for New K–12 Science Education Standards. Board on Science Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Seeing Students Learn Science: Integrating Assessment and Instruction in the Classroom. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23548.
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National Research Council. (2014). Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards. Committee on Developing Assessments of Science Proficiency in K–12. J.W. Pellegrino, M.R. Wilson, J.A. Koenig, and A.S. Beatty, eds. Board on Testing and Assessment and Board on Science Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council. (2015). Guide to Implementing the Next Generation Science Standards. Committee on Guidance on Implementing the Next Generation Science Standards. Board on Science Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Peters, V., Dewey, T., Kwok, A., Hammond, G.S., and Songer, N.B. (2012). Predicting the impacts of climate change on ecosystems: A high school curricular module. The Earth Scientist, 28(3), 33–37.

Quellmalz, E.S., Timms, M.J., Silberglitt, M.D., and Buckley, B.C. (2012). Science assessments for all: Integrating science simulations into balanced state science assessment systems. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 49(3), 363–393.

Reiser, B.J. (2013). Unpublished data from IQWST 6th grade classroom. Collected by Northwestern University Science Practices project. Funded by the National Science Foundation, ESI-1020316 to Northwestern University.

Songer, N.B. et al. (2013). Unpublished resource material from University of Michigan.

Wilson, M. et al. (2013). Unpublished data from the BEAR Center at the University of California, Berkeley.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Seeing Students Learn Science: Integrating Assessment and Instruction in the Classroom. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23548.
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Page 107
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Seeing Students Learn Science: Integrating Assessment and Instruction in the Classroom. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23548.
×
Page 108
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Science educators in the United States are adapting to a new vision of how students learn science. Children are natural explorers and their observations and intuitions about the world around them are the foundation for science learning. Unfortunately, the way science has been taught in the United States has not always taken advantage of those attributes. Some students who successfully complete their K–12 science classes have not really had the chance to “do” science for themselves in ways that harness their natural curiosity and understanding of the world around them.

The introduction of the Next Generation Science Standards led many states, schools, and districts to change curricula, instruction, and professional development to align with the standards. Therefore existing assessments—whatever their purpose—cannot be used to measure the full range of activities and interactions happening in science classrooms that have adapted to these ideas because they were not designed to do so. Seeing Students Learn Science is meant to help educators improve their understanding of how students learn science and guide the adaptation of their instruction and approach to assessment. It includes examples of innovative assessment formats, ways to embed assessments in engaging classroom activities, and ideas for interpreting and using novel kinds of assessment information. It provides ideas and questions educators can use to reflect on what they can adapt right away and what they can work toward more gradually.

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